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One of the International Baccalaureate diploma program core classes is the "Theory of Knowledge." It's similar to epistemology classes offered at many universities.

One of the International Baccalaureate diploma program core classes is the "Theory of Knowledge." It's similar to epistemology classes offered at many universities.

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Andrea commented on Theory of Knowledge

It's true - at the end of the day, what most people suggest are tools and infrastructure for educators.

I was thinking of using TOK as an inspiration for thinking up ways of bridging the gap between formal (taught by others) and informal learning (sought out by self).

Maybe that's the sweet spot to show that what they want to learn and what they do learn can be one and the same, giving them the confidence to go ahead and pursue whatever tickles their creative fancy?

That's a good point, Daniel Katz, about art being likely the most effective means here for younger kids.

It makes me think about how when they're older, you can help children realize that art can be applicable to other disciplines besides the traditional one.

Though it seems so obvious now, growing up I would have been really surprised to find out loving art didn't equate to a career as an artist, paintbrush in hand! And actually nowadays so many artists creatively employ or even invent technical tools to create their art, it's really changed the traditional view of who and what an artist is and does.

This is a really interesting challenge with ideas that could possibly apply to demographics beyond young people (the retired elderly, for one? And so forth)!

Just wanted to ask about a sentence in the written brief: "Maybe it was a parent who pushed you to focus on math or science instead of art."

I'm probably over-reading it and you guys meant it as an example of typical parental pressure, but doesn't that sentence imply that math or science is not creative since it's being juxtaposed against art?

The spirit of the challenge seems to regard creativity as more of an attitude than in relation to a particular discipline, judging by the Kelley brothers' explanation and the images of kids doing 'science-y' (er, creative liberties with language...) tasks in the video.

Again, aware I am digging really deep into this one sentence! It's just kind of a sticking point for me lately because I've noticed a lot of people who identify as 'not creative' automatically shying away from experiences seen as creative, which equates to 'artsy' in their minds.