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WEAVE catalyzes a sustainable feedback loop of inclusive, cross-cultural workforce empowerment by building lifelong learning environments.

WEAVE catalyzes a sustainable feedback loop of inclusive, cross-cultural workforce empowerment by building lifelong learning environments.

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A web-platform leveraging CUs’ strong community ties to grow connectivity of members online via peer-to-peer goal setting, & motivation.

A web-platform leveraging CUs’ strong community ties to grow connectivity of members online via peer-to-peer goal setting, & motivation.

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Tammy commented on WEAVE

HI Kate,

Thanks for your comment! I think that the group that you identified, freshmen/high school students, could definitely be a stakeholder group.

We started our thinking with looking at our community in the SF/Bay Area; there are pockets of immigrant groups and populations that have common gathering areas/hubs for community and support. For instance, SF Chinatown was a forced hub in the early 1900s on due to policies against the Chinese. Tapping into the stories I've heard from those that lived there, the young had common gathering places, e.g. Cameron House, the adults were entrepreneurs out of necessity because no one would hire them due to racial tensions- starting import business, restaurants, grocery stores, and more- and all identified education as the path to upward mobility. Yet, not all could partake in it because of the necessity of work to support their families.

WEAVE hopes to work with anyone, young adults to the elderly, that want an opportunity to connect and learn.

We wanted to create/structure lifelong learning opportunities for all ages within those network hubs that had close ties with universities. We also wanted to create a pathways for university undergraduates and graduates to grow in empathy by engage in social impact initiatives in their community that did not degrade into tokenism, an iterative loop that could evolve as workforce/market place needs changed. We also wanted to create a connection to local businesses. It would build into the community on many levels and start/continue conversations around socioeconomic diversity.

From over a decade of personal experience teaching international students, adults, in in-person classrooms and digital/online classrooms in urban areas, it has always taken a human-to-human connection to excite and catalyze the learning journey.

Depending on need, classes could range from integrating POS software and reporting for best business practices (which could link to university classes on finance, analytics, market research, consumer behavior, computer/app programming, etc), language acquisition through sharing and preserving arts/culture (which could link to university courses in anthropology, arts, communications, etc.), and more.

I think about communities like Oakland and Baltimore where large impactful businesses and large renown universities and immigrant/refugee populations are geographically very close. WEAVE wants to create known clear paths and meaningful partnerships between business, universities, and urban communities for lifelong, evolving, learning opportunities in a community hub, in the university, and in practical experience in a local business.

To be a community based outreach ambassador will evolve as the program grows. To start, it will be a university student teamed with a community gatekeeper and a local business member. As ties strengthen, WEAVE alumni will be the best ambassadors as well as best positioned to start new hubs as they move into new communities.

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Tammy commented on FinTrust

Hi Kate,

Thanks for the comment! I've edited our FinTrust submission to include an attachment of the infographic. Hopefully that helps with readability/enlarge-ability.

In regards to your questions:

The workshops could be both online and in person (e.g. if locality of participants and convenience of physical participation are established).

Broadly speaking, topics could involve financial longevity skill sets/tools. Since our research uncovered that the majority of the spending of those who have retired usually pertains to more day-to-day expenses (hobbies, food, entertainment, bills, etc.) and not large expenditures, workshops can focus on leveraging the strengths of credit unions (individual attention, community engagement, higher savings rates, lower loan rates, etc.) to educate groups on topics as diverse as using the web platform, to identity theft, to managing multiple goals, etc.).

Regarding those who would deliver the workshops, this could range from financial / credit union advisors who have a rapport with the community, brand advocates (e.g. my mother is always able to get her group of friends to try things- thus brand advocate and knowledgeable gatekeeper to reduce apprehension for her friends who tend to be worrywarts(!)) and/or others, in a peer-to-peer manner, in the 50+ age group who have relevant life experiences and guidance to offer.