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Reducing barriers to voting can in fact lower voter turnout. This seeming paradox applies in the case where a low-cost, private voting option is provided (e.g. mail-in). The reason is that social incentives play a large role in voting behaviour.

Reducing barriers to voting can in fact lower voter turnout. This seeming paradox applies in the case where a low-cost, private voting option is provided (e.g. mail-in). The reason is that social incentives play a large role in voting behaviour.

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Michael commented on Falls Check in community pharmacies

Hi Kate,
Joanna Spoth 
We believe that our idea is ‘Most Promising’ and here is why:

Our idea is a low cost, accessible intervention that would integrate well within the current community pharmacy model. The Ontario government currently funds a fee-for-service Meds Check program that allows pharmacists to conduct medication reviews for patients. These reviews can take up to thirty minutes and are typically performed during off-peak hours. A Falls Check program could follow a similar model and take five to fifteen minutes, depending on the assessment and/or review performed. Such a program would allow for risk screening, provision of information and resources to patients and caregivers, and allow for funding of a follow-up consultation.

Our idea for integration of falls assessment technologies within health check stations does not currently exist (that we are aware of). The technological component of our idea would require engaging with one or more health check station manufacturers to gauge interest in the idea of integrating balance platforms (and potentially other technologies) into their health check stations. Integration would likely also require incorporating balance test instructions, results, and follow-up into their digital and hardware platforms. A co-funding approach could be used to incent manufacturer interest in developing a prototype. IDEO Design Services could work with the selected health check station manufacturer to design, develop, and test the balance platform technologies. Some testing and research may be required to validate its use as a falls risk assessment tool, as research to date has focused on the use of the Wii board as a stand-alone device.

Another approach would be to develop an independent balance platform that could be used anywhere in the pharmacy, or by patients and caregivers in the home. This would allow falls risks assessments to be performed in any pharmacy, not just ones that have room and/or can afford health check stations. User feedback suggested that patients and caregivers prefer to conduct assessments in the pharmacy or at home. IDEO Design Services could work with an interested technology partner to design, develop, and test the balance platform technologies.

In moving the project forward, some of the funding would be used for human resources to develop and pitch the project to potential funders (private and/or public) and interested companies/organizations.

The impact of our idea is high, given the potential to scale it up in community pharmacies (e.g. chain drugstores, grocery stores). We feel that our pharmacy intervention will be able to reach a large demographic of older adults, including those at risk of falling, those not yet at risk, and their caregivers, if applicable.

Eventually, we hope that a falls risk assessment will become just as routine, accessible, and as familiar as a blood pressure test in a community pharmacy.

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Michael commented on Falls Check in community pharmacies

Hi Kate,

We have made some updates to our submission, including a user journey (draft) and a summary of some in-person interviews with pharmacists.

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Michael commented on Falls Check in community pharmacies

Hi Barry,

Great to hear that your team is already running a pilot for the Kinesis falls risk assessment technology in several pharmacies. We in fact mention your team's openIDEO project as a potential technology for pharmacists to loan out to patients (just need to add the link). There is not much space in a pharmacy, except in the aisles, so perhaps patients could follow a fixed route outdoors, such around the block or up and down the street.

I wonder if it would be possible to relay the body sensor information by bluetooth to a health check station where an evaluation could be presented (and transmitted), rather than to a person with a receiving device. Less intervention by the pharmacist would be required, there might be more privacy, and no need for mobile computer receiving device. A mobile receiving device could be used in pharmacies without a health check station.

Michael