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Here are just a few outcomes from a 'Girls Who Code' summer immersion program: 95% of participants said they are definitely or more likely to consider studying computer science. 94% of participants feel confident in their ability to use computers

Here are just a few outcomes from a 'Girls Who Code' summer immersion program: 95% of participants said they are definitely or more likely to consider studying computer science. 94% of participants feel confident in their ability to use computers

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Hey Shauna, thanks for the great contribution! Do you have any more info on the FAT tech center? How do they find girls to take part in their program? How is it funded? Be sure to check out my contribution at http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/research/get-women-and-girls-to-a-computer, where I talk briefly about Girls Who Code. I feel strongly about the 'hard skills' approach to focus women's (and especially youth) productive energies into something positive.

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Nicolas commented on Insights on Mobile Phone Usage in India

Hi Meena, what were you guys doing in Nepal?? Karoline's idea looks rock solid to me. I was not aware that Speak-to-Tweet was a "thing", how amazing. One radio-based initiative I've been keeping an eye on is TRAC FM (http://tracfm.org/). The software platform enables radio hosts to collect live mobile polls from their audience and get immediate results which they can discuss on the air. So interesting to me how I barely ever listen to the radio (unless it's NPR, or if Pandora counts) but that in other countries it is a main media lifeline!

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Nicolas commented on Insights on Mobile Phone Usage in India

Just wanted to bring something up which I don't think has been mentioned yet. When thinking about communication through mobile technologies, localizing language is super important. However a lot of phones do not support dialects and non-Roman languages.

“We’re writing Hindi, Bengali, Marathi, Bihari – but it’s still using letters that these folks cannot read. So, how can we expect them to text back to us?” - http://www.forbes.com/sites/eshachhabra/2014/02/20/why-tech-alone-cant-solve-all-the-worlds-problems/?utm_campaign=techtwittersf&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social

"Although there are a small number of Nokia handsets that support a Khmer (language spoken in Cambodia) user interface, uptake has been slow. Even when they are available users often find the process of sending an SMS in Khmer time consuming and difficult. Similar challenges may be faced in other countries that have a unique alphabet, such as Ethiopia." http://www.journalmtm.com/2013/operational-challenges-in-the-cambodian-mhealth-revolution/

In my mind, the problems above do push us back toward voice-based applications, but we should also pay attention to youth and what solutions they are coming up with (alternative languages, etc.)