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In SF if a stranger offers a ride in his car, chances are you will get in. Years ago that would never have happened. Why the drastic change? Online car service platforms have created new ways to trust based on the company's vetting, training and back

In SF if a stranger offers a ride in his car, chances are you will get in. Years ago that would never have happened. Why the drastic change? Online car service platforms have created new ways to trust based on the company's vetting, training and back

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Nathalie commented on Women's Safety Ambassadors

Cool Tasha! We're a team!

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Nathalie commented on The Conversation You Must Have With Your Sons

Hey Cansu--good food for thought. It' s so important to remember that the language we use is important for how we frame responsibility for social issues. Thanks for sharing.

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Nathalie commented on The Lyft or Uber Models Rebranded and Revised

Hey Heather. Thanks for your note. This is admittedly an idea in its most embryonic phase. You bring up an interesting and important point about anonymity. That definitely should be taken into account as this idea iterates.

To answer your question--yes, I was thinking of this as a means to connect women to people and spaces traditionally known as safety zones (e.g. shelters, social workers). But in addition, I was also thinking that the app might be used in case of emergency to connect to people and spaces that are not normally recognized as such (i.e. the visual brand hanging on someone's purse or outside a restaurant would indicate that a person in need has found a someone safe trained to assist ).

This would simplify, of course, if all women and girls in question had a smartphone and could, through GPS, locate safety spaces and people nearby (e.g. a la Tindr). But of course in most places around the world that wouldn't be the case, which makes the visual indicator helpful (e.g. look around to see help instead of to your Google map). One way to solve the anonymity factor might be to have the visual indicators change periodically so that the only people who recognize them are in the network.

Food for thought! :) Thanks for your response.