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Mitra commented on Using lighting to generate power

Hi Haidar - the first video shows about 1.5A, the second shows 40A at 240V - there is no diagram showing where you are measuring those values, so its hard to say what is happening. There isn't 10kW in that circuit, as its probably only a 40W bulb and you aren't dissipating 10kW of heat anywhere that you are showing. Most likely its a highly reactive circuit (big coils do this) so the phase difference between voltage and current measurements means you have the appearance of lots of power and none really being generated.

This is a very common mistake with "Tesla" designers, i.e. they aren't really generating any useful power. Its easy to prove - if you realyl have 40A at 240V then you could run a 10kW load - e.g. 10 * 1kW of heating elements. My guess is that you can't run any more load than the power you are drawing off the powersource (which again you don't mention).

If you are concerned about people counterfeiting then just draw a diagram with the hidden pieces in a box, but showing what is going into the box, from where that comes, and what is coming out.

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Mitra commented on Using lighting to generate power

Understood that you don't wnat to disclose the power, but you are pretty extreme claims (100kW from a chemical reaction) in a field where there has historically LOTS of fraud. When I worked assessing proposals for investors, every single one that used a tesla coil was a fraud, so please understand you have a long way to go to prove that you can generate 100kW from a chemical reaction. (Tesla coils, as I said, don't generate energy, they transform it - very often people who don't understand basic electricity think they are generating power because of the high current reasons and forget that when the voltage and current are out of phase this equates to very little power).

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Mitra commented on Using lighting to generate power

I'm sorry, but if we are talking electricity generation we need to be a bit more precise in numbers - you've said 2500VAC and 50A - which is 100kW, so are you now saying that these are measured at different places, so you have 2500VAC at some unknown current, turned into 40A at some unknown voltage ?

And again - where is the power coming from, power doesn't come from a Tesla coil, a tesla coil takes power at a low voltage high current from one place, and turns it into high voltage low current on its output.