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Richard Louv writes about the value of unstructured play in nature, in cultivating emotionally and physically healthy children. Over-parenting puts undue pressure on children to meet unreasonable and unproductive standards of achievement.

Richard Louv writes about the value of unstructured play in nature, in cultivating emotionally and physically healthy children. Over-parenting puts undue pressure on children to meet unreasonable and unproductive standards of achievement.

Photo of Paul Micklethwaite
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As a child, My was given license to draw on her bedroom wall, when her father left a framed section of the wall undecorated with wallpaper. This made My feel valued, and able to express her creativity

As a child, My was given license to draw on her bedroom wall, when her father left a framed section of the wall undecorated with wallpaper. This made My feel valued, and able to express her creativity

Photo of Paul Micklethwaite
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It is also worth investigating what may have prompted these safety / trust measures to be brought in. Are they in response to some bad experience or unfortunate event where things have gone wrong? Are they precautionary, to reassure participants that any risk is managed? Is there a legal requirement to have these kinds of measures in place? Do the arrangements differ from country to country (social attitudes and norms certainly do!)? Could this heavy emphasis on safety actually put people off ("maybe it's too risky, otherwise why would they have all these measures in place!")? Is this just Northern / Western paranoia?

Re the 'safety' issue - see how the Eatwith collaborative consumption project addresses this: http://www.eatwith.com/#!/brand/safety

link

Paul commented on Unstructured play in nature

Hi Rosie. But then a recent report on UK children's connection to nature contains the surprising result:

"The average score for London was higher than the rest of England. Overall urban children had a slightly higher connection than those living in rural areas."

"Just one in five children connected to nature, says study"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24532638

Not sure how to explain this?!