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If we concentrate on the recyclable materials, like precious metals, plastics and chemical compounds contained within all types of electronic waste, then we can establish a regime for auditing the bulk flow of these materials over their life cycle.

If we concentrate on the recyclable materials, like precious metals, plastics and chemical compounds contained within all types of electronic waste, then we can establish a regime for auditing the bulk flow of these materials over their life cycle.

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In Germany there are recycling centers to collect electronic waste and (at least in our area) there is a van that comes around periodically to collect waste from those who can't get to one of the recycling centers. Batteries are collected through a different system with containers for spent batteries in the stores that sell them.

For batteries the system works fairly well, because the manufactures have realized that it is cost effective to recycle. But for other electronic items the cost effectiveness is less evident. Reports about electronic waste that was supposed to have been recycled ending up in open landfills in Africa or Asia surface regularly in the German media. Apparently private sector self-policing doesn't work very well in all cases. Therefore a robust enforcement regime will be required to make sure that the electronic items that are returned do indeed get recycled.

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Greg commented on Track the Bulk Flow

I'm glad you like it. Feel free to modify it. I look forward to your new concept.

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Greg commented on Track the Bulk Flow

Agreed. A purely private enterprise solution is unlikely to be effective. That is why we need a organization like the EPA to set up binding targets and arrange the auditing.