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Proactive slum retrofitting. Urban slum communities will become more resilient when strengthening their existing houses becomes the norm.

Proactive slum retrofitting. Urban slum communities will become more resilient when strengthening their existing houses becomes the norm.

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Kate commented on Building Resilience

Hi Simone,
Thanks for your comment and sorry for the late reply.  To answer your question - yes, retrofitting can also be a income generating activity for local builders as well as some construction material suppliers. We focus on training existing builders, or new builders with the desire to learn, in disaster-resistant construction practices, and recommend them to homeowners as individuals who are qualified to carry out the work.
We are actually working in Nepal and have trained several hundred builders to date. You can learn more here: http://www.buildchange.org/locations/nepal/ and here: https://www.facebook.com/BuildChangeNepal/?fref=ts, hopefully this can be of use!

Best,
Kate

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Kate commented on Building Resilience

Hi Manik,
I believe that we should receive itineraries in the next few days, and if there are visa requirements we should know at that point. If you don't hear anything by the weekend, maybe we can check back next week.
Looking forward to meeting you in March,
Kate

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Kate commented on Building Resilience

Hi Chioma!
That’s an interesting question, because pre-disaster mitigation is at the core of Build Change’s vision – that there is a permanent change in construction practice so that houses and schools are built safely – but we have primarily worked in post-disaster settings, because we can capitalize on the disaster to bring together the three barriers to adoption (money, technology, people). Our pre-disater retrofit program was only launched in earnest in Colombia in 2014, and in the Philippines we plan to address their biggest lesson learned from the beginning of our program, namely creating demand for safe housing. We want to build on their ideas – raising community awareness of the need for safe construction, providing accessible, user-friendly tools to facilitate construction, helping to facilitate access to financing – but are hoping to get feedback from the Amplify network about other approaches we can take. We believe that Amplify’s network can really help us in identifying and testing different ways to create demand for safe housing by learning best practices from other people/groups testing out systems change projects in urban slums or projects related to climate resilience, finding collaborators working in the Philippines (or Colombia), and getting an outsider’s perspective on our methodology.