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Our idea is to use the available NICS  web-based command & control application to rapidly equip and emplower responders at all levels with the preparation, planning, coordination, response and recovery to this epidemic.  It is mostly visual and desig

Our idea is to use the available NICS web-based command & control application to rapidly equip and emplower responders at all levels with the preparation, planning, coordination, response and recovery to this epidemic. It is mostly visual and desig

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Dr. Jack commented on Next-Generation Incident Command Technology

Lynn

Thanks for your observations and comments. Sorry to take so long to get back.

We concur that there are many differences in structure, language, philosophy, etc., between and among organizational responses to large and extreme-scale events. We also believe that underneath all the apparent differences are a common set of emergency response "nouns and verbs" that can be found at every event, and building upon these can provide the response community with the tools it needs, from front line aid workers to international organization headquarters to government agencies.

 We call this "designing for the Tired - Dirty - Hungry responder under great stress." If we can focus our technology developers on this notional user, then a set of tools, technologies, concepts of operation (CONOPS), and services emerge that can be adapted to an ever changing, chaotic situation. People use tools that they understand, are easy to use, and provide them value. This is one reason NICS is principally visual.

I think of "chat" as being an example (we did not develop it, of course, but just use an open source version, perhaps the same one that many others use). No partner nation, no manager of a UN cluster, no NGO, no front line responder would not use chat because they did not invent it or because it was named something they did not agree with. It is a readily available, trusted tool. People just use it.

We are aware that "command and control" is sometimes viewed as a military concept.....the military spends a great deal of time in its institutions debating just what it means and how to continually improve upon it. (By the way, this is a term/concept that is also readily found in emergency responders in the US (California for sure), so it is not just a military idea. To me, "command" means being in charge and being responsible for your actions. Terminology aside, do we see effective command and control actions (and their basic nouns and verbs) from the various organizations you list? I hope so.

Thanks again for your comments.