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The virus entrapment properties of microfiber fabrics are well known.  Using them for capturing human waste and other body fluids from ebola patients can reduce the amount of water required for attending to patients as well as potentially decrease th

The virus entrapment properties of microfiber fabrics are well known. Using them for capturing human waste and other body fluids from ebola patients can reduce the amount of water required for attending to patients as well as potentially decrease th

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K. commented on Virucide Gloves

So it turns out that this idea has been around for awhile (for example: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn3770-antiviral-gloves-instantly-clean-wounds.html#.VFvezvnF-Cl). Does anyone know if this type of glove is standard issue as part of the PPE?

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K. commented on Containment with Disposable Microfiber

Hi, Craig!

Thank you much for sharing your thoughts. Would spreader bars, as some hammocks have at each end, enable someone to roll over as you described? I completely agree with your insight: that feature seems to be very important in providing comfortable care. I could see where permanent spreader bars could also be helpful as handles in situations where someone in a hammock might need to be transported.

On the other hand, I have read that hammocks without these bars are more stable, and I am wondering if temporary spreader bars can be improvised (with pvc poles or branches or….?) when a patient needs to be turned. There would be added supervision at that time to help keep a patient from falling.

As far as sourcing, my initial thought was that learning about swift procurement of inexpensive nylon hammocks (perhaps with anti-malaria features) from groups like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation would be a reasonable approach. But your suggestions of local knowledge and grassroots initiatives has me thinking longer-term about the West African fishing trade regarding expertise there in making nets, particularly from indigenous materials. In an area with such high unemployment even before the outbreak, putting people to work is surely relevant to the the humanitarian effort as well.