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I think creative confidence is often related to having the right set of skills. If someone doesn’t know how to work with wood, they will be less inclined to design and build a bench than someone who has worked in a wood shop before. Hands-on classes need to become part of our national curriculum to give students the ability to turn their ideas into a reality. It is important that students receive training in craftsmanship because the more clean and refined they can make the prototypes for their designs, the better the feedback they will receive, creating a positive feedback loop instead of a negative one. (“What’s that supposed to be?” versus “Wow, you made that? How does it work?”)
This education reform can be implemented through a two step process of policy change and charter schools. While charter schools have some freedom to decide what classes they want to offer, they are still dependent on state and national laws about what must be taught in schools. Additionally, the hope would be that after changes in national education policy are enacted, and the positive results of these classes on students in charter schools are made public, children in traditional public schools would also have access to classes that teach them how to build and create. America prides itself on exporting creativity, and the purpose of education is to prepare people for the work force, so there is no reason why we should not offer classes that teach crucial concepts such as design thinking, wood working, welding, and graphic design. These skills will benefit students not only in the workplace but also in their daily lives, allowing them to be more self sufficient and able to give back to their communities.

I think creative confidence is often related to having the right set of skills. If someone doesn’t know how to work with wood, they will be less inclined to design and build a bench than someone who has worked in a wood shop before. Hands-on classes need to become part of our national curriculum to give students the ability to turn their ideas into a reality. It is important that students receive training in craftsmanship because the more clean and refined they can make the prototypes for their designs, the better the feedback they will receive, creating a positive feedback loop instead of a negative one. (“What’s that supposed to be?” versus “Wow, you made that? How does it work?”)
This education reform can be implemented through a two step process of policy change and charter schools. While charter schools have some freedom to decide what classes they want to offer, they are still dependent on state and national laws about what must be taught in schools. Additionally, the hope would be that after changes in national education policy are enacted, and the positive results of these classes on students in charter schools are made public, children in traditional public schools would also have access to classes that teach them how to build and create. America prides itself on exporting creativity, and the purpose of education is to prepare people for the work force, so there is no reason why we should not offer classes that teach crucial concepts such as design thinking, wood working, welding, and graphic design. These skills will benefit students not only in the workplace but also in their daily lives, allowing them to be more self sufficient and able to give back to their communities.