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There are three durable solutions proposed by UNHCR: firm resettlement (moving to a "third," usually affluent, country; returning home; and living in the country of first asylum. Less than 1% of the world's refugees are resettled, which could be raised. However, even if it were raised, it still couldn't be a solution for most refugees. Further, the culture of the refugees often suffers during resettlement. Countries of first asylum are, by their nature, close to conflict zones, and often can't really absorb the hundreds of thousands of refugees going there (witness Dadaab in Kenya, right near the border of Somalia, which has similar drought issues, and increasing violence). What could be done to then create more favorable conditions post-conflict in countries once a peace has been settled, to attract more people to go home? This often seems to be the solution with the most dignity for the refugees themselves. Could this include microfinance projects with an additional piece, like civic education? Or with mentoring built into the model? Or whatever is most a challenge in that particular area, like in an area like South Sudan, a condition for microcredit loans is to participation in a regular forum on ways to increase education rates?

I would like to see the challenge of building local economies in conflict-prone areas during the i20 conference. How can we support people in building their businesses, and how can we support mentorship for local business owners? It seems that conflict is best mitigated by people who have an active civil society and a stake in their community and nation, which is often more true is the income level is sufficient. I often think that a model that ties in some version of microfinance and political literacy could have a big impact on areas with ongoing conflict, or in areas prone to conflict.

I would like to see the challenge of building local economies in conflict-prone areas during the i20 conference. How can we support people in building their businesses, and how can we support mentorship for local business owners? It seems that conflict is best mitigated by people who have an active civil society and a stake in their community and nation, which is often more true is the income level is sufficient. I often think that a model that ties in some version of microfinance and political literacy could have a big impact on areas with ongoing conflict, or in areas prone to conflict.