OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign up, Login or Learn more

Profile

Recent contributions

(8)

Contribution list

A trusted delivery service that goes the extra mile, helping with simple household chores or simply stopping by for a chat and a cup of tea.

A trusted delivery service that goes the extra mile, helping with simple household chores or simply stopping by for a chat and a cup of tea.

Photo of Dave Russell
26 28

The Nana Café is a traditional comfort food café in East London run by older ladies from the surrounding area.

The Nana Café is a traditional comfort food café in East London run by older ladies from the surrounding area.

Photo of Dave Russell
3 9

The story of 91 year old Jack, who came back from the brink of institutionalisation following a fall in his home.

The story of 91 year old Jack, who came back from the brink of institutionalisation following a fall in his home.

Photo of Dave Russell
7 14

Teams

(1) View all

Recent comments

(3) View all
link

Dave commented on Overdelivery

Brenda – as someone who might use this service for you mother, would it be important for you to talk to / know who the Overdelivery person was before enlisting their services?

link

Dave commented on Overdelivery

Hey Helder – I recently heard about a very similar service here in the UK which is organised by the charity Age UK. Elderly people can call a phone number and have a volunteer 'handyperson' come and do odd jobs around the house (like changing lightbulbs, taking down curtains etc.).

A few of us recently visited some elderly ladies at their coffee morning to share some of our ideas. Of the ladies we spoke to about the Age UK service, some had tried it and some hadn't, but it was unanimously agreed that it was a great idea. Clearly the Age UK name is very trusted. When we showed them the Overdelivery concept, however, they were slightly more hesitant about letting a stranger into their home.

Building trust will be key to the success of this service. The idea initially came from postmen as a trusted face but with the understanding that their timing is usually quite tight. The question is does this need a trusted charity/business/organisation's name against it to work, or might it be possible to build trust over time as a standalone service? If so how would that work.

In my experience with my grandparents, trust is built through two things – consistency and reliability. Be there when you say you'll be there and do what you say you'll do. Perhaps the level of service builds up over time – initially the Overdeliverer stops for a brief chat, and as they get to know their customer they might begin to spend a bit more time with them on each delivery.

link

Dave commented on Overdelivery

Yeah, the whole issue of how this is introduced to people / how people indicate their interest in the service is a bit of a challenge (we know from our research that people are often reluctant to ask for help for fear of feeling like a burden). It could be interesting as a subscription model rather than an additional delivery option, especially if that's something family members could sign their relatives up for.