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"There are places on Earth, in every country, where, for various reasons, good schools cannot be built and good teachers cannot or do not want to go..." Sugata Mitra (TED Talk).
In these places can another way of learning emerge, like self learning

"There are places on Earth, in every country, where, for various reasons, good schools cannot be built and good teachers cannot or do not want to go..." Sugata Mitra (TED Talk). In these places can another way of learning emerge, like self learning

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David commented on Grown-ups as a tool for children to access knowledge

Very interesting post, Anne-Laure.
Montessori is also an interesting approach
It considers, and my wife and I could really check it with our daughter, that children from 1 to 2 years old are not interested by toys and are fascinated by adults and they want to learn everything adults do. Thus we created an environment where she had her own clearly defined area in the bathroom, her own shelves in the kitchen with her plates, her glasses, her food, her bassinet with soap and towel to wash her hands. She prepared real meals with real food, by having her sitting on the kitchen table, using with minimum supervision the robots and tools. Although food was always accessible she never took it outside of the defined time, we trusted her to understand the rituals and as she wanted to copy us, she wanted to respect the rituals as well. It helped her developing skills and more importantly self confidence, feeling she is an equal member of the family (new paradigm considering that children understand a lot and they should not only play with toys and being told only basic words). she developed a lot her autonomy as we did not consider that we know and she has to learn from us. We consider that we offer new opportunities to learn but she follows the way she wants, it is always a learning for her and for us (honestly who cares if our cookies are spherical and not conventionally flat and round...the flat ones have a better taste).

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David commented on Their first book: Providing access to books

I fully agree with you Anne-Laure.
I would like to add one point that I noticed with my 2 years old daughter. She "reads" books very often since her early age and she looks at books with different eyes as she grows. She started by recognizing the characters then their link (who is the mother, the father, the child, the friends, the grand-parents...) then she looked at the environment of the stories, then the activities of the characters and now she is interested by the feelings of the characters (are they crying, sad, happy...). She understands also the situations and the norms and values of our society through the explanation and the exchange we have when reading the books. We do not just read the text but we use books with our daughter as an opportunity to discuss values, behaviors, feelings, deductions from what is shown to what might happen, we make comparisons with what she is actually living in her real life. Books are a fantastic vehicle to learn/explain our community codes, culture, norms and values and thus can enable behavioral changes.

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David commented on Baby Starter Kit (i.e. Finnish Baby Box)

That's a very good initiative.
In France there is an initiative following the same principles.
For children below 6 years old, you can access pediatricians for free (without any conditions of access, no income limit, no ID of any kind is asked, no social security required, you can even be a clandestine) in my small town the visits happen 2 days per week in a dedicated and equipped medical house. You receive medical check-ups, advices about nutrition, feedback about child's development. Vaccines are also free of charge.
The only interest is the well-being and development of the children.