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New parents, even with university degrees, find raising a child a challenging task. Parents in low-income communities are, in most cases, unaware of the importance of the first five years of their children's lives from a cognitive and character

New parents, even with university degrees, find raising a child a challenging task. Parents in low-income communities are, in most cases, unaware of the importance of the first five years of their children's lives from a cognitive and character

Photo of Dana Atallah
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Dana commented on 3C Fund: Community's Cyclic Commitment to Education

Hello, 

I read your idea with great interest but I'm going to be somewhat of the devil advocate here.  This is not any novel new idea.  For decades, across the world, through various organizations, government sponsored scholarships, armed forces, community organizations, etc., low income students and non low income students had the chance to obtain some kind of scholarship for university education with the hope that they give back either to their community, country or the entity that granted them the scholarship.  However, I have come across many students, during my university days, that got away with not giving back.  I remember a student from China, who told me that her entire village pooled their resources to send her to the US to continue her graduate education.  She ended up getting married and never returned or paid back (as far as I know).  Additionally, the whole idea is to give students the ability to graduate without the burden of a debt.  I don't see this as a solution to lower the cost of education.  If anything, it would inflate the cost once interest is calculated into the pay back.  Why would anyone want to be paying for their college degree 15 years later, when work experience becomes more relevant.  A detailed cost/benefit analysis should be done.  This is a long term commitment and would only serve a very small group of people.  Good luck!

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Dana commented on We Love Reading: Refugee-led Reading Circles

Dear Rana,

Congratulations on your NGO's achievements at the Zaatari Camp and in Jordan. There is a lot more to do and I wish you all the success to enable you to take the WLR initiative further. One way, that I thought of, that could be revenue generating that would help in scaling this initiative, provide some income to the refugees, and at the same time provide ownership for the children, their parents and the volunteers, is to ask the children to write a story (stories), provide illustrations, and turn it (them) into a book, publish it and make it available for sale, locally and regionally, online and offline. Translate it and share it with WLR groups in other parts of the world. This could be replicated in other refugee camps and pockets in inner cities, that have approached you to collaborate. The stories shared by children would bring a true perspective of how children in refugee camps are dreaming, thinking, developing, etc. Revenue generated from the sales of the books would need to be shared with the NGO (for scaling purposes) and the children. Just an Idea on Open Ideo!

Shukran 3ala kul juhoudek. (sorry, I don't have Arabic keyboard).

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Dana commented on We Love Reading: Refugee-led Reading Circles

Hi Rana,

You can check with Al Masar Centre ( http://almasar.edu.jo) in Amman, they might be able to put you in touch regarding Arabic Sign or Dr. Manal Hamzeh who has worked in the field before but is now a professor in the U.S. She is from Amman and could be a good resource if you decide to take this forward in the future. http://wsprogram.nmsu.edu/faculty-and-staff/manal-hamzeh/

Great Work!

Dana