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Right? I love that it's a complete educational product loop - not only is Treehouse offering students the training, but they're attempting to address the "what comes next?" side of things too, once you've completed their courses. Treehouse has a vested interest in getting tech employers taking their program seriously enough to validate these outside-the-box credentials among potential applicants.

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Cynthia commented on Designed for the Dump

Thanks Ashley! This is such a relevant challenge to our future economic activity, and its message is resonating with me on a personal level at the moment: I'm moving out of my apartment and am absolutely disgusted at the number of unused and obsolete electronics components, cables, and devices I've accumulated over the years! There must be a better way!

Your question of finding examples is an interesting one that's worth doing a deep-dive on. I'm curious myself! So many corporate "green" initiatives are just marketing speak in disguise.

Apple is one of the primary consumer electronics manufacturers leading industry discussion on electronics sustainability and environmental responsibility. They offer free e-recycling at their retail stores, have elevated minimal packaging to an artform, and charge consumers more money for (what they call) a more reliable product. While it's debatable how effective Apple has been in its actual practice, and there's no question that there's still a long way to go, I do appreciate that my 5-year-old Macbook still works like the day I bought it. http://www.apple.com/environment/

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Cynthia commented on Designed for the Dump

Jeffrey, this is a great thought, and I think electronics manufacturers would be open to it. It's exactly one of the things that European organizations and governments hav formalized with regard to cell phones. The Micro-USB is now the accepted standard for cell phone charging, eliminating the accumulation of incompatible, device-specific charging plugs.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/12/29/european-standardization-bodies-formalize-micro-usb-cellphone-ch/