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How do a tiny European Starling or Common Grackle Remain Safe When Attacked by a Faster, Larger and More Maneuverable Predator? How can nature inspire solutions that provide safety, resilience, survival and empowerment to women in low-income urban ar

How do a tiny European Starling or Common Grackle Remain Safe When Attacked by a Faster, Larger and More Maneuverable Predator? How can nature inspire solutions that provide safety, resilience, survival and empowerment to women in low-income urban ar

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Adam commented on Peregrine Falcon v. Starling...Winner?

Thanks for reflecting and building. This originated as biomimetic inspiration, and love the introduction of mapping and Ushahidi. So, connecting flocking/confusing predator patterns with identifying/signaling/mapping predator presence, similar to a culturally-relevant Waze, as noted by David here: http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/research/open-user-created-mapping-and-real-time-notifications-waze

To your question, a few biomimicry inspiration points of signaling danger or harm, indicative of low-tech ways of mapping/mobilizing may be:

Alarm pheromones released when a single bee stings that signals a threat and quickly mobilizes other bees to swarm in defense.

Release of pheromones by ants or snakes to indicate to others they are on a productive (safe) trail to food (life).

Specific-frequency alarm calls by individual birds that call others to flock near a predator, then a higher-frequency call to mob the predator (e.g., Great Tit songbirds v. owls).

Linkages exist here between animal signaling and innovations in human signaling via wearables as referenced in bras by: http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/research/if-you-have-to-wear-it-anyway
...and other examples like this that many have contributed to the forum: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/start-up-disguises-wearable-tech-as-jewelry/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

On changing predator or mens' behavior like: http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/research/it-s-a-men-s-issue-and-a-peer-group-issue

Question: How might nature teach us how to evolve predator behavior to increase safety of vulnerable populations?