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Everybody has dreams - but much to often we keep them to ourselves. "Dreams in a Box" is designed to help 10-15yr olds to develop, draw & discuss their dreams - Then share them with the world to inspire personal imagination and empower local chan

Everybody has dreams - but much to often we keep them to ourselves. "Dreams in a Box" is designed to help 10-15yr olds to develop, draw & discuss their dreams - Then share them with the world to inspire personal imagination and empower local chan

Photo of Anne Kjaer Riechert
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Nkosi Johnson was a South African child born HIV-positive, who made a powerful impact on public perceptions of the pandemic and its effects before his death at the age of 12. Nkosi´s story shows that you are never to young to have an impact!

Nkosi Johnson was a South African child born HIV-positive, who made a powerful impact on public perceptions of the pandemic and its effects before his death at the age of 12. Nkosi´s story shows that you are never to young to have an impact!

Photo of Anne Kjaer Riechert
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"Kids Have A Dream” is a global exhibition project visualizing childrens’ dreams for the future. More than 3,000 youth (10-15yr) have participated in 23 countries so far. After each workshop the dreams are collected and exhibited worldwide.

"Kids Have A Dream” is a global exhibition project visualizing childrens’ dreams for the future. More than 3,000 youth (10-15yr) have participated in 23 countries so far. After each workshop the dreams are collected and exhibited worldwide.

Photo of Anne Kjaer Riechert
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Hi Mathieu,

I like your concept - assisting kids in making their own dreams come true.

Based on my personal experience running www.kidshaveadream.com for 7 years, I can only emphasize Justine´s point about the necessity of getting help from good lawyers for the "privacy" and "terms & conditions".

Copy right issues is another challenge to look into. This especially becomes an issue if you would like to scale the idea to marginalized youth (*who needs it the most), where the parent-child communication channel might not be working. Ex. The kids don´t like being at home. Another issue is off course their access to technology/internet

I would be really interested in hearing your ideas about how one could adapt your concept to fit marginalized youth in the developing world.

One last point to consider, is what age group you would like to target. My experience is that if you ask kids under 10 years old what they dream about for the future you will mostly get fantasy stories, because their cognition is developing. As the kids get older, introducing concepts like "Future" "Dream" "Discovery" "Action" becomes easier and a connected process. Ex. If I dream of becoming a famous soccer player in Champions League, I need to do x, y, z now.

I hope that was helpful. Good luck with the idea. I am happy to provide more ideas and feedback.

Wonderful work Sarah. And what a great video. I would love to do something similar for my own project. I run a project called Kids Have a Dream, which also the medium of art to empower children and give them a global voice. I just uploaded my project here: http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/inspiration/kids-have-a-dream/ - In essence I work with local school teachers or social workers and teach them how to run local workshops where the students draw their dreams for the future. Afterwards they send the drawings back to me, and I make them into exhibitions to raise awareness about global issues and raise global understanding. Right now I am in the process of raising money to fund a large exhibition on the Berlin Wall for the 25th anniversary next year. The idea is to illuminate 100m of the remaining Wall with dreams from kids in 100 countries.

link

Anne Kjaer commented on Kids Have a Dream

With regards to the point about "trust" it is important when working with minors, obviously. But it is also important for the process. A teacher/social worker who already knows the child, can dig deeper and ask smarter questions, than an outsider can.

It is however a challenge to educate the teachers so they know how to ask the right kind of open-ended questions and not give any answers or the impression that there is a right an wrong answer. That kills the creativity.

To educate the teachers I have a peadagogical guideline that I send to the teachers in advance of the workshop. Then I encourage them to design the workshop themselves and present their suggestion in a skype call with me. Together we then come up with the plan of how to run the workshop.

My future plan is to create a network of teachers who has done the workshops before, so they can inspire and learn from eachother. That will have a bigger impact. I try hard to make myself redundant, basically!