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Lillian commented on Hazel: preserving meaningful conversations

Hi Kate,

Hazel has three parts in terms of hardware:
1. the sensors, we're able to sell them for a nominal fee because they are cheap to manufacture;
2. the smartphone, which many caregivers will already have;
3. the tablet, which can easily be purchased for less than $100.
Finally, we are thinking of charging a nominal monthly fee for Hazel's services. In order to determine the number for that recurring subscription fee, we'd like to further interview users to understand what they would pay for, and how much they can afford. It is our goal to make Hazel affordable and accessible to all families, especially low to mid-income families.

Lastly, to give you a sense of how low we can charge for our custom sensors, the sensors we are using cost between $2-7 usd, depending on which functionality. To compensate for the basic hardware, we developed gesture recognition algorithms to detect specific actions that the users will perform. The algorithms are based on machine learning which can further specify the activity the user performs (e.g., taking a pill versus moving the pill box).

Cheers,
Lillian

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Lillian commented on Hazel: preserving meaningful conversations

Hi Kate,

Sure thing! For our MVP, we're targeting a pillbox sensor, door sensor, and a fall sensor. We (and many other competitors like Philips Lifeline and Great Call) believe that being able to detect these three activities (taking medicine, wandering, and fall accidents) are crucial to the individual's well-being and safety.

Caregivers can send alerts to themselves if a certain activity happens (or does not happen). For example, if the care-recipient is supposed to take his/her medicine at 4pm everyday, and the caregiver received an alert saying that no-one took the pills at 4pm, he/she can contact the care-recipient and remind them to take their pills. Another example is that is the caregiver received an alert saying that the care-recipient has fallen, he/she can either contact the care-recipient, pay a house call, or even call 911. To put it simply, Hazel will alert the caregiver if there are any emergencies or unsafe behaviours happening in the care-recipient's home.

A few other activities we'd like to track in the future are the care-recipient's eating habits, sleeping patterns, and social well-being. All of the above will help the caregiver better understand the care-recipient's progression in the disease, and maybe will help the caregiver provide more tailored care.

I hope this answers all your questions! Let me know if you need more elaboration. Thanks for your interest.

Cheers,
Lillian