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Lisa commented on Hacking a Credential

IMO if a reputable (not necessarily large—simply reputable) employer finds it sufficient, then that's all that matters. Because your second employer will rely on the reputation of the first employer, and so forth. People need a bite-size way to enter the workforce quickly, where their education and personal brand-/skill-building really takes off. I was talking to a BFD college president the other day who brushed off GA and other bootcampy things by saying they were only for "already bachelors degree" people.... as if 10 years of Clay Christensen innovation theory (ahem, disrupters enter thru the "bottom" of the market) had somehow skirted his twitter feed. Le sigh.....

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Lisa commented on Hacking a Credential

Lucy, great point! I think the Open Badge system has huge potential. One interesting aspect: they describe themselves by saying, "As a disruptive innovation, Open Badges are reimagining ways to recognize learning beyond formal credentialing systems." ... What if the system of Open Badges *became* the formal credentialing system? They talk about recognizing learning "beyond" formal structures like universities, but what if an entire undergraduate education could be badged instead of printed on a registrar's transcript? I could imagine a badge for Sociology, another badge for American History, another badge for Business Calculus! (just remembering some of my toughest freshman year courses). If this existed, it would be almost like an enormous, totally comprehensive, institution-agnostic, assessment-driven, nationwide (even global?) articulation schema. Now THAT's exciting. It's like being able to use a single currency anywhere!

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Lisa commented on Hacking a Credential

Audey, the thought you've put together here is incredible. Transformation in postsecondary is all about the human experience, especially that of the "New Normal Student", which means we (and the sector) need real images of who these people are. You've done a fantastic job of describing four of the most common personas, right down to the town and state they live in. The storytelling power here is strong and motivating. How might we get these images/personas out there and more readily envisioned/understood by decision makers and the general college-educated public who, in their mind's eye, typically see an 18-yr-old, baccalaureate-seeking, residential, parent-supported, child-free, non-first-gen, non-military, likely white young person?