OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

Profile

Recent contributions

(1)

Contribution list

Helping children grow their curiosity might be the best thing for their development. If they are curious, they will want to learn, to discover and to understand things on their own, because they want it and not because someone tells them they have to

Helping children grow their curiosity might be the best thing for their development. If they are curious, they will want to learn, to discover and to understand things on their own, because they want it and not because someone tells them they have to

Photo of Loris Bottello
4 6

Recent comments

(3) View all

I agree with you David. I think it might be useful to have this kind of micro-farms in schools and teach children how to take care of plants, to make them feels responsible about something that can help their family.
Some friends of mine organised a daycare for kids through the summer and they created a small garden for vegetables: kids planted the seeds and had to water it and take care of it. They were very satisfied when they eventually were able to harvest something, and in the process they also learned the importance of daily commitment for a long term goal.

Interesting thoughts, thanks for sharing. I can imagine that the creation of groups of parents with children on the same age could be very useful in contexts where there are few doctors looking after big communities. Parents would start to know the clinical history of other children and maybe ask their peers advice if the same conditions happen to theirs.

link

Loris commented on The power of curiosity

A wonderful book I found about building (and satisfying) curiosity: http://www.fiftydangerousthings.com/

I'm so glad to find out that I did almost all those thing when I was young :)