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Hi Rebecca and Victoria,

Transportation is a huge issue for people who have limited time and money, and it's not an obvious answer when discussion nutrition so thanks for bringing it up! I think the convergence of transport / time / money limitations are a big motivator for people to just grab something at a 7-11 on the way home.

In some other threads we've discussed the potential to build on the food truck model and make it relevant to delivering produce in low-income areas. There is also the possibility of sharing schedules and products on Twitter to allow people to plan and etc.

Example: http://www.laweekly.com/restaurants/detroits-peaches-and-greens-truck-a-food-truck-that-sells-produce-instead-of-tacos-2381288

I also like the idea of leveraging pre-existing transportation systems like Uber and Lyft...that's really innovative thinking.

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Erica commented on Navigating Food Deserts

Thanks for the response Steve--I've learned a lot from you in this discussion thread!

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Erica commented on A multi-faceted approach is necessary

Hi Peter,
Looking at incentives and inefficiencies in the supply chain sounds like a great (and simple) way to structure some ideas.

I live in Johannesburg, and price discrimination for in-season produce is absolutely rife around South Africa when you compare grocery stores in upper class suburbs with townships and rural areas. It's even pretty dramatic just in the (admittedly very sprawling) JHB metro area. I wonder why this may not be as drastic in U.S. cities?

I also love the idea of leveraging inefficiencies in the supply chain a la Panera. How could we incentivize this for the companies involved?