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Establishing family routines and rituals improves parental efficacy and a child’s socioemotional, language, academic, and social skills. There is a difference between routine (a functional action) and ritual (an action that has meaning). These can be

Establishing family routines and rituals improves parental efficacy and a child’s socioemotional, language, academic, and social skills. There is a difference between routine (a functional action) and ritual (an action that has meaning). These can be

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Steve commented on Consistency

We're bringing it, Meena! Catherine, I emailed directly at your Middlebury address.

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Steve commented on Consistency

Hi Catherine -

No problem on the delay. I've been swamped lately, but can begin to focus on this over the weekend or during next week. This is my first challenge, and hence, first idea phase. I'll familiarize myself with how things go down over the weekend. Is this something we do synchronously? 60 minute brainstorm? If so, I found a cool web-based app for brainstorming from a start-up company in Canada. They gave me a free trial that I believe has expired, but I'll gladly pay the monthly fee for us both to use it. It has lots of templates and stickies and can be synchronous and asynchronous, ties to google docs, etc. The final products can be downloaded and then uploaded to IDEO. Check it out: www.blankcanvas.io

What do you think? Overkill or just right?

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Steve commented on Routines and Rituals

I interviewed my mom. She provided some facts regarding how she maintain routines and rituals (traditions) in light of mobility and isolation.

“Not knowing anyone in the community, I put more emphasis on the rituals we already had, ones that referred to other family members who could not be with us.”

Examples: Decorating the Christmas tree with Nana’s ornaments; Setting up a toy train that used to belong to my dad; Making Nona’s (my great-grandmother) recipe for stuffing; I also remember making popcorn and watching The Wizard of Oz every year.

“From there, I made friends with the neighbors and we eventually shared our rituals and traditions. I joined the PTA (parent-teacher conference) and volunteered to help work the “spaghetti supper” and other events.”

“We tried church on Sundays, but that didn’t last long.” (my brother and I were too unruly).

“After the neighbors, school, and church, things started to revolve around sports (baseball) and I volunteered at the concession stand with the other parents.”

“All of these activities led to knowing more and more people with kids and their events.” “oh, and we also looked through lots of photo albums of family.”

My insights from this:

1) Rituals/Traditions can involve people who are not there. They become there in spirit (transcending the space and time).

2) Meet people in similar situations - people who live close by, parents that have kids in the same school, religious group, or kids that play the same sport.

3) Volunteer to work some part of each of these activities.

4) If one of these things doesn’t work, try a new activity.

5) Networks of people will grow over time. The nature of the rituals and traditions will grow and change as more people are added.

6) Food is an important part of rituals and traditions.