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Harlem Children's Zone

Geoffrey Canada created the Harlem Children's Zone back in the 90s and it has since developed into a program that reaches more than 10,000 young people.

Photo of Emma Scripps
8 14

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One piece to HCZ that I find particularly relevant to this challenge is The Baby College that Canada started as a part of his vision. HCZ's Baby College provides expectant mothers with information on pre-natal care, and also provides workshops on care for children ages 0-3.  

The wrap around service model is interesting and might provide a great source of inspiration in thinking about other ways parents can be supported to provide the best care for their children. 

You can read more about the HCZ here:  http://hcz.org
 

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Photo of Joanna Spoth

Emma I'm a huge fan of HCZ and Geoffrey Canada - great post! Some general food for thought from him: "Kids who are poor often have families that have not really been kept informed about... how important it is to read to your child, to reduce stresses in their life, to use positive incentives and words." In addition to prenatal care, it's important to think about the impact these simple actions have early on.

Photo of Emma Scripps

Totally! Your comment actually made me think of this Atlantic article I read a while back: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/04/and-dont-help-your-kids-with-their-homework/358636/

The gist is that modeling behaviors like reading for pleasure or sticking through a tough problem is key to childhood development - even more so than say being knowledgable in certain areas of school that your child may be struggling with...

Photo of Joanna Spoth

Super interesting! Provides a counter-argument to parents simply being around to "help" as important to academic development. It's important to think about what kind of support and development is most critical early on.

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