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Promoting Local Nutrition Solutions (Updated March. 10, 2015)

We identified a realistic, scalable and community engaging idea addressing the increasing childhood stunting and wasting in low income areas

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Update march. 10, 2015

GUIDE TO COMPLEMENTARY FEEDING FOR MOTHERS AND CAREGIVERS.

Understanding how children’s nutritional needs change.

Between the age of 6 months and 2 years, a  child’s nutritional needs are quite different from those of older children and adults. Although all the nutrients the child needs are usually obtained by giving a varied diet, sometimes it’s difficult to guarantee the correct balance. This guide (booklet) has been designed to help mothers and caregivers  understand the child’s growing needs from 6 months up to their 2nd birthday. The guide also offers practical information and handy tips on how to meet the child’s nutritional needs.

How to introduce complementary foods to children at six months

The recommendation is that new foods be gradually introduced, one at a time, every three to seven days. It is common for infants to reject new foods, but this should not be interpreted as permanent aversion to that food. On average, infants need to be exposed to a new food eight to tentimes until they accept it well. Breastfed infants tend to accept new foods more easily than non breastfed ones, because via the breast milk, they are exposed to different flavors and scents very early which vary according to the mother’s diet.

Therefore, at the beginning of complementary feeding (six months), the foods should be specially prepared for the infant.

The foods should be initially semi-solid and soft (in the form of a puree), and  be crushed, never sifted or blended.

The child’s food intake (amount, frequency,) should be gradually increased, considering the infant’s eating skills.

The infant can be offered family foods, provided that they are crushed, mashed, chopped or cut into extremely small pieces. Offering the child solid foods should be restricted, and sharp foods and/or foods with a texture should be avoided (e.g.: raw carrots, nuts, maize grains, as they choke the infants.

  • Complementary foods should be given using a spoon or glass, which are well accepted by infants. Baby bottles should be avoided because, in addition to being an important source of contamination for the infant, they interfere with oral dynamics and may cause nipple confusion, exposing the infant to a greater risk of stopping to breast feed completely. One should recall that the use of baby bottles is not necessary during the baby’s growth. Complementary foods can be offered either before or after breastfeeding.

When infants exclusively breastfed for six months are not developing properly, befo considering the introduction of complementary foods, a careful assessment should be made to verify whether they are  ingesting too little breast milk due to a poor breastfeeding technique, which leads to inadequate emptying of the breasts and, consequently, to low milk production. In these cases, the usual recommendation is that mothers receive instructions and support so that there is increased intake of breast milk and complementary feeding is not introduced unnecessarily.

Another important cause to exclude is whether there is any infection. Infectious illnesses are common causes of growth faltering. If possible, compare the growth of the child with the WHO growth curve for breastfed children. The child who seems not to be growing well should be assessed before complementary feeding is introduced.

Dangers of early complementary feeding

- A child does not need these foods yet, and they may displace breast milk. As a consequence the mother produces less milk and later it may be more difficult to meet the child’s nutritional needs;

A child receive less of the protective factors in breast milk, so the risk of illness increases;

The risk of diarrhea also increases because complementary foods may not be as clean as breast milk;

The complementary foods given are usually watery porridges or soups because they are easy for babies to eat. These foods fill the stomach but provide fewer nutrients than breast milk;

- Mothers are at greater risk to get pregnant if they breastfeed less

Risks of giving complementary foods too late

- Child does not get the extra energy and nutrients needed;

- A child stop growing or grows slowly;

- Increase the risk of malnutrition or micronutrient deficiencies.

NUTRIENTS REQUIRED BY THE CHILD OF 6-23 MONTHS.

IRON

Two legumes are rich in iron but the iron is non haem thus intake of vitamin C rich foods is encouraged to aid in the absorption of the iron.

Iron is important for your child’s brain development, especially between 6 months and 2years. A deficiency of iron during these early years may have a profound influence on learning later in life.

Sources of iron.

Meat, liver, beans, millet, dark green vegetables.

Is your child getting enough iron?

The symptoms of iron deficiency can be hard to detect. Your child may just consistently seem to be a little bit weak. It can also lead to slowing down of the child’s growth and development.

Symptoms of anaemia are much easier to spot as your baby may seem to be more irritable than usual, tire, pale or suffer from loss of appetite.

Prevention of iron deficiency in your child

  • Give plenty of iron rich foods like meats, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes.

  • Iron comes in two forms: haem iron, which is contained in meat is more absorbed by the body than non haem iron which is found in pulses and green vegetables thus can be served with fruits and vegetables rich in Vitamin C for easy absorption

PROTEINS

The two legumes complement each other and make a complete high biological value protein required by the child.

Proteins are important to the body through;

  • Development of the brain and other organs

  • Body immunity

  • Digestion enzymes

Sources of proteins.

Animal sources:- meat, chicken, fish, eggs, milk

Plant sources:- beans ,Gnuts, peas, soya beans.

CARBOHYDRATES

The two legumes and a cereal provide sufficient carbohydrates that provide energy to the child’s body.

Importance of the carbohydrates.

These are energy giving food thus they give your child energy.

Sources of energy in foods

fats

oils

High fat pulses and seeds

butter

Soy oil

Groundnut (peanut)

ghee

Coconut oil

Soya beans

lard

Sun flower oil

Pumpkin seeds

margarine

Olive oil

Melon seeds


Ground nut oil

Sunflower seeds



Sim sim seeds




MICRONUTRIENTS NEEDED

VITAMIN A.

This helps maintain a strong immune system and is important for normal growth and development, particularly your baby’s eyes.It also helps maintain healthy skin, teeth and bones.

Sources of vitamin A.

The major food sources of vitamin A are liver, egg yolk, milk products, dark green and leafy vegetables and yellow/orange vegetables and fruit (carrots, pumpkin, red peppers, yellow peppers, mango, passion fruit and paw paw).

VITAMIN C

This helps the body to absorb iron from iron rich foods.

Sources of Vit C.

Citric fruits, vegetables, all fruits.

VITAMIN D

This vitamin basically depends upon direct exposure of the skin to sunlight.

Sources o vitamin D.

Exposure to sunlight

CALCIUM.

These are essential to help build strong, healthy bones and teeth. Calcium also helps the heart, nerves, muscles

Sources of calcium.

Milk, eggs, silverfish,

MEAL PLAN

6 months


Daily diet

Breakfast

Breast milk

Lunch

4 dessertspoons of mashed irish + soya beans+ beans + pumpkin leaves

supper

4 dessert spoons of mashed rice+ beans + peas +amaranthus

Note: Continue breast feeding on demand.

6-9 MONTHS


Daily diet

Breakfast

  • Breastmilk

  • 250 ml (1/2 cup) Breakfast cereal (millet porridge with milk or magarine, beaten egg.)

Mid morning

Snack

  • 1 /8 slice of mashed paw paw

Lunch

  • 6 dessert spoons of mashed Beans +ground nut + sweet potatoes + nakati

  • Breast milk.

Supper

  • 6 dessert spoons of Mashed rice+ soya beans + beans + amaranthus

  • Breast milk

snack



Continue breastfeeding on demand

9-12 MONTHS


Daily diet

Breakfast

  • Breast milk

  • ½ (250mls) cup of maize Porridge with milk

Mid morning

Snack

  • 1 mango

Lunch

  • 10 dessert spoons of mashed peas +G.nuts + matooke and a slice of avocado.

Mid afternoon

Snack

  • 200ml fermented millet porridge

Supper

  • 10 dessert spoons Boiled soft peas+ soya beans+ sweet potatoes + sukuma


Continue breastfeeding on demand

12- 23 MONTHS


Daily diet

Breakfast

1 ½ cups of maize- soya porridge + milk

Mid morning

Snack

  • I banana

lunch

  • 2 cups of beans+ peas + posho+ nakati

  • I glass of juice

Mid afternoon

Snack

  • I tomato or mango or slice of pineapple

supper

  • 2 cups of ground nut + soya + matooke +bugga (red amaranthus)

  • 1 glass of cold fermented millet porridge.


Continue breast feeding on demand

Recipes for some of the complementary dishes.

Two legume one cereal recipe

Day

Ingredients

Method

Additional notes

Monday

½ a cup of Beans

2 desert spoons  of g. nut paste

½ a cup of maize flour

A pinch of salt

½ a cup amaranthus

1 ½ cup of water

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add the g. nuts and water to the sauce pan and stir well with a spoon.

Then add the other ingredients and stir to mix evenly

Cover the sauce pan with a tight fitting lid.

Steam for about two and half hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Beans to be coked should be soaked overnight and the test a is peeled off the following day.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

We prefer steaming this food; nutrient losses in this method of cooking are minimal and the food cooks well with less incidences of burning.

Tuesday

½ a cup of garden Peas

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

½ a cup of rice

A pinch of salt

½ a cup ofdodo

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add all the ingredients to the sauce pan.

Add waterand stir evenly.

Cover with a tight fitting lid and steam for about 1 ½ to 2hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Peas to be cooked should be soaked overnight and the testa is peeled off the following day. This makes the beans soft hence cooking faster.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

Wednesday

½ a cup of Beans

½ a cup of soya beans

3 fingers of mid-sized Matooke

A pinch of salt

½ a cup of pumpkin leaves

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add all the food the sauce pan.

Add water and stir evenly.

Cover with a tight fitting lid and steam for about 2 to 2 ½ hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Beans to be cooked should be soaked overnight and the testa is peeled off the following day. This makes them soft hence cooking faster.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

Thursday

½ a cup of Soya beans

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

1 sweet potato tuber

A Pinch of salt

½ a cup of amaranthus

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add the g. nuts and water to the sauce pan and stir well with a spoon.

Then add the other ingredients mix evenly

Cover the sauce pan with a tight fitting lid.

Steam for about two and half hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Beans to be cooked should be soaked overnight and the testa is peeled off the following day. This makes them soft hence cooking faster.

The potato is chopped into small pieces which can cook faster.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

Friday

4 desert spoon of g. nut and  simsim paste

4 mid-sized Irish potatoes

A pinch of salt

½ a cup of pumpkin leaves

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add the g. nuts and water to the sauce pan and stir well with a spoon.

Then add the other ingredients mix evenly

Cover the sauce pan with a tight fitting lid.

Steam for about 1 to 2 hours

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel

Saturday

½ a cup of beans

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

¼ of a small sized pumpkin

A pinch of salt

½ a cup of dodo1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add all the food the sauce pan.

Add water and stir evenly.

Cover with a tight fitting lid and steam for about 2 to 2 ½ hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Beans to be cooked should be soaked overnight and the testa is peeled off the following day. This makes them soft hence cooking faster.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

Sunday

½ a cup of garden Peas

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

A cup of millet flour

A pinch of salt

½ a cup of Sukuma

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

Add the g. nuts and water to the sauce pan and stir well with a spoon.

Then add the other ingredients mix evenly

Cover the sauce pan with a tight fitting lid.

Steam for about two and half hours.

When the food is cooked, you mash it finely and then divide it into two portions; one portion is served for lunch and the other is kept warm to be served for supper.

Beans to be cooked should be soaked overnight and the testa is peeled off the following day. This makes them soft hence cooking faster.

Both lunch and supper is cooked at the same time to make food preparation economical for the mother in terms of time and fuel.

Additional notes


Natural foods are good 

  • Have meals on time

  • Animal proteins can be included on the menu when available.

  • A glass of natural juice on each meal can be good source of vitamin c responsible for enhanced absorption of non-heme iron present in plant sources.

Common Food fads

Food fad

Correct information

Avocado is not good for the children because it softens their stomach leading to diarrhoea

Avocado is good for the child but what leads to diarrhea is the hygiene in the preparation of fruit.

Irish potatoes  with margarine is the best food for the children when they have started complementary feeding

Irish and margarine is not the well balanced to be the best food but rather is an energy rich food.

Dark green leafy vegetables are eaten by the poor.

They are good for vitamins A and C which is important for the immunity of the child thus its food for all.

Ground nuts make the child diarrhoate

This is not true,Gnuts are good protein source especially if you combined them with another legume. The diarrhea is brought about by the hygiene and not cooking the gnuts well till they are ready.

Children are supposed to be given only soup but not the meat.

Because meat can be hard and you think its going to choke the child but the meat for the child is supposed to be grated into very small pieces that ate like powder and then cooked well to soft then mashed together with other foods.

A lot of mangoes and maize cause malaria

During this season, the mosquitoes breed a lot and this leads to mosquito bites that cause malaria.



BUDGETED MENU WITH NUTRIENT CONTENT.

Ingredients

 Price 

Quantities (g)

energy (kcal)

Protein (g)

fat (g)

iron (mg)

zinc (mg)

1/2 a cup of Dry Beans

 UGX300.00

125

471

26.8

31.7

6.4

2.9

2 desert spoons  of g. nut paste

 UGX200.00

50

294

12.5            

25.2

0.95

1.45

1/2 cup of maize flour

 UGX250.00

125

461

9.1

2.25

1.37

0.88

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup amaranthus

 UGX200.00

50

11.5

1.25

0.15

1.15

0.45

1 cup of water

 UGX50.00

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX1,100.00

1281.7

49.65

64.3

9.87

5.68

½ a cup of garden Peas

 UGX1,000.00

125

402

29.4

1.6

10.4

4.25

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

 UGX200.00

50

294

12.5

25.2

0.95

1.45

1/2 cup of rice

 UGX800.00

125

450

8.25

0.75

1

1.5

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup Avocado

 UGX200.00

11.5

1.25

0.15

1.15

0.45

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX2,300.00

1201.7

51.4

32.7

13.5

7.65

½ a cup of Dry Beans

 UGX300.00

125

471

26.8

1.5

6.4

2.9

½ a cup of soya beans

 UGX500.00

125

588.7

44.3

31.7

4.87

3.75

3 fingers of mid-sized Matooke

 UGX300.00

300

366

3.9

1.2

1.8

0.3

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup of pumpkin leaves

 UGX200.00

50

9.5

1.6

0.2

1.1

0.1

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX1,400.00

1479.4

76.6

39.6

14.17

7.05

½ a cup of Soya beans

 UGX500.00

125

588.7

44.3

31.7

4.87

3.75

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

 UGX200.00

50

294

12.5

25.2

0.95

1.45

1 sweet potato tuber

 UGX200.00

150

160.5

3

0.05

1.05

0.6

A Pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup of amaranthus

 UGX200.00

50

11.5

1.25

0.15

1.15

0.45

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX1,200.00

1098.9

61.05

62.55

8.02

6.25

4 desert spoon of g. nut and  simsim paste

 UGX600.00

100

588

25

50.4

1.9

2.9

4 mid-sized Irish potatoes

 UGX400.00

360

277

7.2

0.36

2.88

1.08

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup of pumpkin leaves

 UGX200.00

50

9.5

1.6

0.2

1.1

0.1

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX1,300.00

918.7

33.8

55.96

5.88

4.08

½ a cup of Dry beans

 UGX300.00

125

471

1.5

6.4

2.9

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

 UGX200.00

50

294

25.2

0.95

1.45

¼ of a small sized pumpkin

 UGX400.00

75

19.5

0.75

0.075

0.6

0.225

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

½ a cup of dodo

 UGX200.00

50

11.5

1.25

0.15

1.05

0.45

sub total

 UGX1,200.00

840.2

41.3

31.925

9

5.025

½ a cup of garden Peas

 UGX1,000.00

125

420

29.4

1.6

10.4

4.25

2 desert spoons of g. nut paste

 UGX200.00

50

294

12.5

25.2

0.95

1.45

A cup of millet flour

 UGX400.00

100

374

10.9

4.2

3

1.7

A pinch of salt

 UGX50.00

1

0

0

0

0

0

½ a cup of Sukuma

 UGX300.00

50

17

1.75

0.2

0.95

0.1

1 tea spoon of vegetable oil

 UGX50.00

5

44.2

0

5

0

0

sub total

 UGX2,000.00

1149.2

54.55

36.2

15.3

7.5

Grand total

 UGX10,500.00

How we are progressing.

  • As per the feedback we have developed a complementary guide for caretakers of children 6 months to 2 years.

  • We reached out to PEAK value industries about a partnership in the distribution of the precooked bean sauce although we are yet to get feedback from them. We also partnered with Urban TV and they are shooting a mini-series about nutrition which will be aired.

  • We trained the caretakers and fathers from Sebowaon home gardening to grow vegetables to supplement their children’s diet. These caretakers and fathers were given bottles to act as their gardens since they do not have a lot of space at their homes to put the vegetable gardens.

  • The team has developed behavior change messages and is going to pretest them with the mothers and caretakers.

  • We have come up with a list of partners for hand washing and sanitation related interventions and have contacted some and we are waiting for replies.

  • The team led by Jamiru and Brian, held urban vegetable growing sessions with local community members and YEN team on Jan. 22, 2015 at YEN centre.

  • Jamiru and Afra (the leads of Mushroom project) working through a local mushroom training company set up mushroom project in YEN as means of earning income to sustain the youth activities but also to train the youth and community members to grow the mushroom. Women and men from Sebowa zone were invited so they can learn to grow the mushroom as means of improving diets for their children

  • Brian, the agronomist of the team facilitated orientation of the mothers and the team on urban vegetable gardening too.

  • The experience was great for the mothers and the team members. Mothers seem to find vegetable growing more doable than mushroom growing. They think it is easier and cheaper to grow the vegetables than mushrooms

  • As way forward, Brian will add more gardens in the centre and we will work with the community to have them try out growing the vegetables and keep using the centre to learn better techniques; we will continue dialogue with the community about mushroom growing too.

We were convinced that we conclude break through and get to the hearts of families and caretakers to better prepare, feed and care for children during the most critical period of 6 months to 2 years. The team through individual experience and from technical reports understood that children of this age group are largely fed dilute and nutrient deficient diets. The realization that talking about nutrient rich animal based diets is unpractical for low income communities, drove us to Two Legumes, One Cereal Meal for Smart Children. We wanted families and mothers to know they can achieve their dreams of having smart children who could support them in their old age if they fed and took better care of them during the age of 6 months to 2 years.

We noted that mothers in low income communities find it difficult to provide their children with high quality protein based diets required to accommodate rapid growth and development. Coupled with micronutrient deficient diets and inadequate hygiene practices, we got concerned that children of age 6 months to 2 years in low income communities would continue being stunted and wasted due to infections and inadequacies in highly needed nutrients in the body.  We were even more saddened by the fact that current interventions focus on impractical solutions that often do not engage families, mothers and other stakeholders in designing and monitoring. So we came up with the idea of combining two plant protein sources and at least one cereal to make one complete high value biological protein meal. Plant protein sources are readily available in these communities so we saw it as a possible and achievable practice. However, our team still had concerns about micronutrient intake by these children. The team agreed to use the Two Legumes, One Cereal as the springboard for inclusion of fresh vegetables and fruits and/or fortified food in the diets of the children. Despite these two proposed solutions, we were not sure if they would get accepted by families, mothers and other stakeholders in Kampala and Central Uganda.

Our team with good understanding of emotion-based approaches to data collection and human centred design, conducted research to find out what exactly happens in these communities regarding complementary feeding of the children of age 6 months to 2 years.   The research confirmed that mothers difficulty in providing quality meals with the little support they get from their husbands. 

A mother said “That is a long process because these days there is no time for cooking this food so I just cook convenient foods, foods that will take a very short time to get ready. Another challenge is the fuel for cooking variety of foods, charcoal is very expensive so cooking a lot of food is expensive.”

From the research we realized that these mothers had to be taught what to do so that they see how easy it is to prepare better nutritious and safe meals for their children of age 6 months to 2 years. Mothers seem to have a wrong perception that they cannot feed children variety of the usual family diet. This could be an issue of not having sufficient knowledge and skills to make balanced complementary meals for their children out of available family foods.

We shared our findings with the OpenIDEO community and received very good feedback that helped us think hard and synthesize the information obtained.  At the end of the Idea phase, Two Legumes, One Cereal for Smart Children had been selected among the 31 final ideas for Refinement. We received very good feedback from the Shanghai and New York designers, which helped us refine the idea further and to get more specific. We decided to prototype meal preparation as advised by the designers.  We used the food demonstrations and nutrition education sessions to show the mothers and fathers how to prepare the mixture of two legumes one cereal which they found simple and easy to prepare at the same time less time consuming. They also realized they could afford the foods and the mothers were happy to try it out at home. Mothers and caretakers from By providing mothers and fathers details of small amounts of ingredients need to make safe meals for their children, they realised feeding their children aged 6-23 months was not as expensive as they first thought. They also conceptualized the issue of keeping children’s food safe by always washing food and hands, keeping food warm and promoting the practice of keeping play and eating environment clean.

Our intervention will have social impact on the targeted families, mothers, fathers and other stakeholders through having healthy children, saving on the time and money they would have used to treat their children, and increased social status in their communities by having smart children. We anticipate the intervention to also create more champions of change like the mothers who after the initial food demonstrations set out to teach their fellow mothers about preparing safe blended food for their children. This will make them feel smarter than other mothers. The local leaders, village health teams and health workers will eventually feel smart and highly respected by helping reduce the burden stunted and wasted children in their community. The campaign will ensure that the beneficiaries have the opportunity to benefit by; speaking at public events organised by others, appear on TV or radio programmes, organise demonstrations and reach out to others through word of mouth. When Urban TV heard of the work we are trying to do in these communities, they reached out to us and filmed the food demonstration. They would like to continue covering such community activities and showing them on TV as means of having more youth engage in meaningful community initiatives that promote social change. engageSPARK, a social enterprise using mobile health platform to help non-profits reach out to targeted audience with campaign messages, conduct polls and monitor uptake of interventions gave us opportunity to pilot on their platform and is willing to partner with us on this project. All these provide opportunities for these communities to share ideas and reach out to others.

Also, the team from International Youth Empowerment Network (YEN) learnt and gained a lot from the mentors and other partners in YEN. These youth have been empowered to use their own power to advance the well-being of their families and their communities.  We are convinced the partnership demonstrated by OpenIDEO community, Amplify Team, YEN and the community will go a long way in finding lasting integrated urban farming, nutrition, ECD and hygiene solutions for children of age 6 months and 2 years in low income areas.

Our next steps are:
  • Develop an illustrated complementary guide for caretakers of children 6 months to 2 year

  • Design budgeted complementary feeding menus

  • Reach out to potential partners like engageSPARK, PEAK industries and Urban TV

  • Train caretakers and fathers on home gardening to grow vegetables and vegetables

  • Developing and pretesting behaviour change messages with mothers and caretakers

  • Develop communication materials to be aired on TV, radio, articles to be put in local newspapers, etc.

  • Look for partners for hand washing and sanitation related interventions

  • Prototype Stone Stories game with our communities

  • Refine monitoring and evaluation plan and tools

  • Continue prototyping complementary food preparations and filming the process with Urban TV

  • Organize community meetings to plan for the implementation and monitoring of the intervention

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Photo of An Old Friend

Thanks Wekesa for the link. I will try to get in touch with the guys at Pulse lab. They have not yet replied my e-mail.

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