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The relationships of school-based sexuality education, sexual knowledge and sexual behaviors

a study of 18,000 Chinese college students

Photo of Shuting Jiang
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Compare to American people, most of Chinese (we can say Asian) students have less sexual education when they are young. Some parents and teachers don't know how to talk to kids about sexual knowledge, so kids can only learned from porn videos and games. 

First, I want to share a Youtube video, which talked about the differences of sexual education between China and USA (English version). Click Here.

From the video, I can feel that, this problem is more serious in Asian countries. So I started to research something about Chinese sexual education, and here is the research paper I want to share with you. 

English summary:

With the aims to better understand the knowledge level of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) among Chinese youth and how this is associated with their sexual behaviors and reproductive health outcomes, this study conducted a series of quantitative analyses using the data from an Internet-based survey that investigated SRH among Chinese college students. We looked specifically into the associations of school-based sexuality education, knowledge on SRH with sexual behavior and reproductive health outcomes among college students. A total number of 17,966 undergraduates aged between 18 ~ 25, from over 130 Chinese colleges were included in the analyses. Results showed that only a half of the respondents reported having received school-based sexuality education, and they scored significantly higher in the SRH knowledge quiz. A higher SRH score was found to associate with better sexual behaviors and reproductive health outcomes. Students with higher level of knowledge on SRH were less likely to report negative reproductive health outcomes such as unintended pregnancy or abortion (in both males and females), and were more likely to use contraceptive methods in the last or the most sexual intercourses (only in males). Such findings support the need for a better implementation of school-based sexuality education in China, and for policy makers to employ a gender-sensitive approach, especially in empowering the girls, when designing education programs.

Please click here to read the research paper.

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Photo of Ashley Tillman

Hi Shuting, thanks for sharing this research post! You highlight some really important factors when thinking about successful sexual and reproductive health education, whether that's geography, gender, cultural stigma and communication patterns or the medium people are learning from. Based on your findings I am curious your thoughts on what interventions and mediums might be most effective and scalable? Looking forward to learning more!