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KIKWETU HUBS: A Community Space Providing Social Entrepreneurship Research Training, Volunteership, Start-up Finance and Incubation Support

Create employment through social entrepreneurship and enhance employability skills in youth

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

Our idea is to train youth in social entrepreneurship while using new approaches to problem solving such as design thinking, link them with volunteering opportunities, create an enabling environment for networking with industry players, encourage start up ideas and obtain financial funding. Our idea solves the problem of youth unemployment as well as lack of employability skills found among new graduates by employers. At Kikwetu Hub, youth will be placed in cohorts in accordance to their areas of passion, encouraged to join various membership and volunteering platforms and thus will be motivated to excel and mentor their peers. Upon completion of training, youth will gain on the job experience from volunteering as well as much needed soft skills essential in today’s job market. In May this year, NurSYPK Kenya formed a partnership with Omprakash, https://www.omprakash.org, a web platform that connects organizations with volunteers. It gives donations to organizations, grants to volunteers and provides opportunities to raise project funds through crowd sourcing. Through this platform, volunteers will be encouraged to apply for various volunteering positions at https://www.omprakash.org/global/nsyo-kenya/apply as they continue with their social impact training. Youth will also be encouraged to come up with viable income generating ideas that may be funded through grants, equity earnings, micro-finance loans or link up with impact investors.

WHO BENEFITS?

The beneficiaries are out of school youth, graduates seeking to enter the job market and youth in school and tertiary institutions. Through Kikwetu Hub, the youth will benefit by learning and developing new skills through the social impact they engage in; they will be proactive change makers and will learn to give to the less fortunate in the society thus will develop servant leadership skills which include excellence and integrity. Out of school youth get a chance for self employment .

TELL US MORE ABOUT YOU

Nurture Smart Youth Program Kenya (NurSYP Kenya) is a non-profit organization whose aim is to empower and nurture the youth attain social-economic self sustainability. We have previously trained youth in Nairobi County but plan to scale our impact deeper and spread out to other counties in Kenya.

WHERE WILL YOUR IDEA BE IMPLEMENTED?

  • Kenya

EXPERIENCE IN IMPLEMENTATION COUNTRY(IES)

  • Yes, for more than one year.

EXPERTISE IN SECTOR

  • I’ve worked in a sector related to my idea for over a year

HOW HAS YOUR IDEA CHANGED BECAUSE OF BENEFICIARY FEEDBACK?

Our idea has changed for the better after beneficiary feedback. Responses from 40 plus youths revealed that over 90% of youth supported the idea but stressed the need for it to be well implemented for impact. Emphasis from other conversations on the element of our idea disclosed the need to have an all inclusive community working towards the same course and that the idea should not be left for the youth to implement alone. We therefore sense the need to include the communities and families in which the youth live in to provide support to them either through financial assistance, psychosocial support in the form of encouragement or by purchase and use of products and services from innovative ideas that the youth come up with. We also see the need to have youth join Kikwetu Hub with an affordable membership and training fee to facilitate running of the program. While training, the youth will be encouraged to come up with viable ideas while in their cohorts and pitch them for start up support. Link up with various employment opportunities as volunteers or employees will be done and a fee collected from either party.

HOW IS YOUR IDEA UNIQUE?

Our idea is unique as it equips, empowers and nurtures the youth to learn and acquire social entrepreneurship and employability skills and provides continuous mentorship to the youth until they are confident to stand on their own. We will also add value to youth internally through soft skills acquisition they obtain and externally through hands on job experience they get while volunteering. One unique advantage we have in implementing this idea is the fact that we are using design thinking tools in the early stages of its formation thus designing with the recipient in mind. This ensures success of the program as future challenges are identified and nabbed on time while initial involvement of youth enhances sustainability of the program because they embrace and own it. Our training programs will be offered at affordable rates compared to our comrades thus cater for the masses at the bottom of the pyramid. Another advantage is that youth will be encouraged to come up with viable income generating ideas which will result in a variety of social enterprises emerging from different sectors of the economy, these being; Agricultural, ICT, Designer Industry, Renewable Energy.

WHY DO YOU THINK THAT THE PROBLEM YOUR IDEA SOLVES FOR HAS NOT BEEN SOLVED?

Although there are many programs countrywide tackling this problem, a lot more needs to be done. A report from the National Police of Kenya shows that crime rate increased by 4% in 2015 when compared to 2014. According to a World Bank report, the working age population in Kenya rose to 56% in 2014 from 47% in 1990. Unfortunately, the jobs creation rate is not fast enough hence the need to increase job creation in the informal sector. A study done in 2002 by APHRC revealed that unemployment is among the reasons that drive youth into alcohol and drug abuse, trying to escape the reality of hardships. The above scenarios are clear indicators that the problem is far from being solved

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR UNANSWERED QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS IDEA?

Would young people be self motivated to participate in our program and remain committed to it? What kind of awareness materials/ media would be most effective in ensuring this happens? What kind of training would adequately cover the knowledge and skill needs of young people and make them better social entrepreneurs/ employees? How efficient and effective is the support to enable start ups establish strong social enterprises? How replicable is it for set up for rural women? Is our mentor benefit package motivating enough to potential mentors? Is it beneficial? How can we conduct effective Job placement of our trained youth?

IS THIS IDEA NEW FOR YOU OR YOUR ORGANIZATION?

The idea is new but related to what we have been doing and aspiring to achieve in the long term. While the previous programs primarily involved us going to speak to our beneficiaries, this one involves both; them coming to our premises and receiving the training and then utilizing what they have learnt to go out and mentor others or start their own ventures. It differs from the previous one in that it forms deeper bonds with the beneficiaries and it has an aspect of creating value for the youth communities in whom it aims to serve. In addition, Kikwetu Hub provides an opportunity for NurSYP Kenya to become self sustainable in that youth volunteers can be engaged in research, data collection activities and content creation which may be made available to interested parties at a fee. The fee will be used to facilitate other research work. Clients requiring research work or content done for them may engage volunteer youth who will deliver professional work satisfactory to clients’ requirements. We will partner with government agencies, their representatives, donors and the private sector to ensure success of the program.

WHO WILL IMPLEMENT THIS IDEA?

This idea will be implemented by Nurture Smart Youth Program Kenya (NurSYP Kenya) as an organization in collaboration with a team of volunteers led by Deborah Nyambu. This team comprises of full time and part time volunteers among them Dr. Barnard Aseto, Dorothy Mbungu, Fladwell Rawinja, Alice Kimani, Donald Mwaluma, Audrey Saru, J Mutuku and Stella Kachumbo. NurSYP Kenya will provide the infrastructure to operate in and the team will devote their time and energy to make the idea a succes

Social entrepreneurship is a fairly new name especially in East Africa although it is a concept that has existed time in memorial in form of cooperative or fair trade movement. Running a social enterprise has its challenges the main one being sustainability.  It also requires a change of mindset from ‘big break’ mentality to one of patience and endurance.

In Kenya, a small percentage of youth believes in it but tend to put more emphasis on the business aspect of it.  In the more developed world, social entrepreneurship is being used to create innovative scalable solutions that have ripple effects trickling down to emerging markets.

In their book on Social Entrepreneurship, Huybrechts and Nicholls state that Mair and Marti (2004:3) define social entrepreneurship as “a process consisting of the innovative use and combination of resources to explore and exploit opportunities that aims at catalyzing social change by catering to basic human needs in a sustainable manner”

In other words, social entrepreneurship is a technique used to solve societal problems while at the same time creating income.  The emphasis here, though, is to have more social impact being realized than the revenue generated.

SHARE ONE SENTENCE ABOUT THE IMPACT YOU WOULD LIKE THIS PROJECT TO HAVE FIVE YEARS FROM NOW, AND ONE QUESTION YOU NEED TO ANSWER TO GET THERE.

To have a community of 50 economically empowered youth who positively change their society through vibrant social enterprises. How do we ensure sustainability of our social enterprises?

MY ORGANIZATION'S OPERATING BUDGET FOR 2015 WAS:

  • Under $100,000

MY INTENDED BENEFICIARIES ARE:

  • Within 50 km of where our team does most of its work

HOW LONG HAVE YOU AND YOUR COLLEAGUES BEEN WORKING ON THIS PILOT PROJECT TOGETHER?

  • Between 6 months and a year

WHY ARE YOU INTERESTED IN JOINING AMPLIFY'S PORTFOLIO OF INNOVATORS?

We are interested in joining because of the potential we see in using Human Centered Design principles in solving problems especially for our country. This concept could revolutionize youth engagement and economic empowerment policies in Kenya.
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Team (5)

Elly's profile
Elly Mulah

Role added on team:

"Hey, like your idea so much, maybe we can work as a team?"

Deborah's profile
Ahmed's profile
Ahmed

Role added on team:

"Hi, you have a really great idea there, Ahmed...maybe we can team up?"

Kevin's profile
Kevin Mureithi

Role added on team:

"Hi your idea is very good, maybe we can team up?"

Ongoza's profile
Ongoza

Role added on team:

"Hey, I like your idea...maybe we can collaborate?"

67 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah Nyambu and Empower Youth,
Do you think grain moisture testing to stop Postharvest loss like aflatoxin would be a skill empowering youth to meet employers and learn the
Agricultural market place?
See <https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/youth-empowerment-challenge/jobs-for-youth-to-reverse-cereal-grain-postharvest-loss>

William

Jobs for Youth to Reverse Postharvest loss

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William, yes, I believe grain moisture testing to stop postharvest loss could be a skill empowering youth meet and learn a lot in the agricultural market place.

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello  Deborah Nyambu,
Thank you for the reply. Should we exchange email and then user experience maps and
form a team to collaborate so the experts can see how our innovative team would help youth implement, learn and established business that reverse Postharvest loss like aflatoxin?

The moisture testing project believes aflatoxin indicates a very weak link in the East African grain value chain. 

William

Jobs for Youth to Reverse Postharvest loss

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William, thank you for reaching out on working as a team, but time is far gone.  I have a small team of young people am working with and we are using design thinking tools to obtain feedback from youth.  We interview one group tomorrow and another the following day, iterate then submit.

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah,
We are interested to read the height of the rural girls entering your program. And hope youth provided feedback about stunting caused by aflatoxin so the net benefit of other interventions to have meaning.
Cardwell says it best in “Aflatoxin Identifying the Way Forward” Retrieved:
<http://www.fsnnetwork.org/sites/default/files/Kitty%20Cardwell%20Presentation.pdf>.

Regards,
William

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William, thanks for the reminder on rural girls entering our program.  Now about feedback on aflatoxin....guess thats for another day:-)

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William,
I am interested to know how we would go about creating awareness of stunting caused by aflatoxin among rural women in our project.  If we were to partner with you, where would we start?

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah,
Thank you for the chance to discuss.

"Jobs for Youth to Reverse PHL" (NeverIdlle)  is eager to partner as Nurture Smart Youth Program has experience and are using design thinking tools to identify and curb challenges that would have emerged later and in the long run adding value to the inward and outward person is an advantage over other similar initiatives.

Together NeverIdle and Nurture Smart can answer the UNANSWERED QUESTIONS. NeverIdle believes that preventing grain has very high value (quantitative and qualitative) and thus motivational to youth and communities looking for serious social enterprises.

There is a substantial and significant body of work regarding aflatoxin that is being ignored (Cardwell, PAEPARD and Lindahl). This body of knowledge strongly suggests grain aflatoxin is stunting, mentally and physically rural communities.

High calorie grains power most of the human labor and animal power needed to grow densely nutritious vegetables, fruits and meat. if aflatoxin is in the food supply other interventions lack meaning... there are no healthy outcomes to education etc if young years mean eating grains that contain aflatoxin.

The first and cost-effective step to preventing aflatoxin is to monitor moisture content of grain and then. once the grain is dry store it well.

Moisture meter resemble mobile phones. Youth who operate phones and apps can learn moisture meters, the grain drying processes in their communities and enhance grower knowledge with accurate sampling and testing and record keeping.
Simply growers with accurate moisture measurements can be more effective at harvesting, drying, Commercial growers know this and are likely to hire staff who have first hand experience providing services to growers, testing, monitoring, aggregating, storing for a sell date, pest management and marketing. for increased net benefits.
Not to mention the exponential benefits of nutritional, decoupling price from healthy choices, and producing surplus to reduce imports and increase exports.

Our partner ship would require funding and so I would approach Key ICRISAT and Esoko stakeholders and anyone listed at my LinkedIn. Our partnership would be a means for ICRISAT and Esoko to address their inadequate PHL interventions that impact the net benefit of improved cereals and sms information. NeverIdle moisture testing has been to UNEP Nairobi for EBAFOSA, Esoko, African Regional Standards Organization, and Madame Anna Onyango at Ministry of Environment and others.

I hope the above brief helps. Please accept LinkedIn invitation for additional context and send an email to <NeverIdleFarms(at)gmail.com> so I can provide supporting reference material and the full "Jobs for Youth'..." and "Storage to Reverse..." articles and answer any questions to continue our discussion.

William
23324768850three

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you William,
Thats a handfull of info...lemme digest it will get back to you...

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah,
I am surprised aflatoxin in Kenya is new, so glad you have a heads up.
For pictures, user experience and more explanation see both "Jobs for Youth to Reserve PHL" at
<https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/youth-empowerment-challenge/jobs-for-youth-to-reverse-cereal-grain-postharvest-loss> and
<https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/agricultural-innovation/jobs-for-youth-to-reverse-cereal-grain-postharvest-loss> and
"Storage Rights to Reverse PHL" at
<https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/agricultural-innovation/storage-to-reverse-grain-postharvest-loss>
Thank you for feedback,
William

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William,
Its not new as such, your technique is what is unique...

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah,
Thank you for the insight. However, metal grain storage has been around for +100 years. See The Great Grain Bin Adventure" by Butler <http://butlermfg.com/en/about_us>. Hopper bottoms have been raised utility for 50 years and they have been mobile for +25. Just ask any Australian grain farmer.
What is unique is the SSA corruption that prevents for example, storage and hand soap from stopping aflatoxin and ebola respectively. Ruxin (2014), advises “Step One to Fighting Ebola - Start with Corruption”.
Moisture meters initiate the fight against SSA corruption and aflatoxin by giving growers scientific testing that is hard for corruption to control. Then storing dry and clean grain in mobile utility reduces drudgery, decouples nutrition from price and awards disadvantaged access to markets. The resulting grain surplus reduces imports, increases exports to fill foreign exchange reserves.
Simply, moisture testing is the beginning of farming's triple-bottom-line for growers.

Regards,
Willliam

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William,
Thanks for the info. I am truly enlightened now…we learn new things everyday! Talk to you later.
Best regards.

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Deborah,
Thank you for LinkingIn. But "Talking... Later" is why aflatoxin (and other PHL) causes Africans to enjoy imported flour and rice more than their own.
What can we do now?
William

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello William,
Patience pays,we will get there...Rome was not built in a day...

Best regards,
Deborah

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Debirah,
Have you been to Rome? Reference to Rome is irrelevant as proud African cultures have been around far far longer.
Maybe we should approach PHL this way "What imported brands of flour and rice do you and your family enjoy?" As in [disadvantaged] food-scarce conditions, is bad food still better than no food at all? FoodAfrica ILRI researcher J. Lindahl (2016) says that it might be true, although with PHL like aflatoxin-contaminated food the judgement could be difficult.”

"Tackling [grain] post-harvest loss is not rocket science. It does not require technological breakthroughs or years of high level scientific research as do some of the other challenges we face" (Etharen Cousins, Executive Director UN WFP). This substantial body of knowledge about aflatoxin (and solutions to PHL) has existed for many years, yet the advantaged in Africa ignore it.

Trivializing PHL like aflatoxin is inappropriate.

Thank you for the chance to continue and reference this discussion so others are enlightened.
Highest Regards,
William

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Deborah and Team! Amplify and our experts have some questions and comments for you. We encourage you to reflect on this feedback as you continue to improve and refine your idea!

- The idea of giving youth the critical thinking skills to solve problems in their own communities is a valuable one, but also a very challenging problem to solve! A valuable exercise for you is to ask and answer questions about funding, job placement, resources for youth with ideas, etc. that are related to your idea to highlight its feasibility and viability!
- Are there limiting factors for youth out of school? What are they? Are there specific challenges they are facing other than skills development?
- We are curious to know how your organization will be sustainable and how you intend to approach this challenge. Will organizations that are looking for qualified youth pay you a fee for bringing them to you? What is your network of partnerships and your working relationship with them? How have you worked together?
- Are there similar organizations or intervention approaches like this that you can gain inspiration? We want to encourage you to seek inspiration and learn from failure!

Looking forward to reading more!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Amplify Team and Experts. Indeed, we agree with you that our idea is a valuable one and requires a lot of zeal and commitment to birth it to reality. I believe we are prepared for this!

Some of the resources for youth with ideas that we could use include research grants for start-up ideas, micro-finance, equity investment as well as mentoring and coaching their ideas until they bear fruit. Job placement activities could be done by Kikwetu Hub youth volunteers who will learn how to communicate with companies that have vacancies, filter job opportunities (online/ offline) and match them with the CVs of trained youth. The youth will be taken through interview preparation tips and counseled.

There are a number of limiting factors for out of school youth, these include finding meaningful employment as a result of dropping out of school or being an ex-offender. Lack of guidance in managing the businesses they start hence most of them under perform. Those who want to go back to school are sometimes faced with parents who are very disappointed with their behavior or are unable to pay the fees. They also face the challenge of broken families, poor relations between them and their families or the community which makes settling back into their previous environment difficult unless interventions from a third party is sought to reconcile them. Kikwetu Hub will provide a cushion for such youth as they will find a space where they develop a sense of belonging in a community that networks, shares experiences and obtains sound advice. Young mothers and youth from foster homes also fall into this category.

In regard to funding, we intend to have an annual fundraising campaign where we will involve Companies under their CSRs ventures, well wishers, family and friends as well as International donors.

In order to sustain our organization, we intend to charge membership and training fee as well as encourage youth to come up with viable income generating activities and agree with them on how they will give back to the organization either through a percentage of equity, loan repayment or donations for others to benefit from in the program.

According to a USAID 2010 report on youth profiles in Kenya and Ethiopia, there is lack of data at national and international level regarding the status of youth; information that is vital to development of policies and programs that address the needs of the youth. Youth volunteers at Kikwetu Hub can be engaged in research and data collection activities and a variety of content creation done that may be made available to interested parties at a fee. This fee could be used for other start up research and data collection work. Alternatively, through Kikwetu Hub, volunteer youth can source for research grants to conduct specific research as assigned by paying clients.

In May this year, we formed a partnership with Omprakash.org a web platform that connects organizations with volunteers. It gives donations to organizations, grants to volunteers, trains volunteers as well as offers scholarships to deserving volunteers. We plan to utilize this platform to crowd fund for our youth projects come 2017 as well as make structural changes to our volunteer team by making additions of Development & Fundraising Coordinator, Resource Mobilization Officer, Content Designer and Writers. We also plan to upgrade our website to be more interactive thus improve our social media effectiveness and enhance our effort with the Omprakash Volunteering program. So far we have been writing blog content that aims to create awareness of Omprakash presence.

We also partner with the Ministry of Education who allow us to access their public primary and secondary schools on condition that submission of a report after every school visit is done. We work well with this Ministry and hope to elevate our relationship in 2017 from not only visiting schools, but also tertiary institutions.

Organizations that do similar work like we plan to do are Amani Training Institute, Tangaza University and RISE Kenya. Their training costs are high and offered at MBA level. RISE Kenya has certificate and Diploma.

One challenge that RISE Kenya had with their trainees is the issuance of certificates since they were not a college/ campus. They had to seek partnership with Tangaza University to solve this problem. Another challenge they face is getting learners to pay the cost of training which is heightened by cost of accomodation.

An inspiration from RISE Kenya is that their learners reported almost 100% growth after practicing what they learnt. Among them are hoteliers, farmers, tailors, carpenters, renewable energy innovators, to name a few, who are now successful job creators.

Another inspiring idea picked from Amani Institute is their out-door training environment. We hope Kikwetu Hub will inspire creativity and an overflow of ideas through similar infrastructure.

Photo of Caroline
Team

Great idea Deborah
As you noted, it is very important to include the communities: the business cannot develop if they do not make sense for the community.

good luck

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Caroline,
I also admire what you are doing with the youth, creating leaders and promoting revenue generating activities that enhance sustainability. Good job! And best of luck to you too...

Photo of Elly Mulah
Team

Thats great Deborah,social entrepreneurship is the driving force of the economy and the primary targets are the youth

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Well said, Elly...

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello Elly, I trust you are keeping well.  I am just wondering, if we were to bring a small team of youth to you to visit and at the same time obtain a one week training on soft skills through you, what would it entail?

Photo of Elly Mulah
Team

Hi Deborah,
Am doing well.
It will be my pleasure.Please let's communicate via my email:ellymulah@gmail.com or emulaha@dotrust.org

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Elly, will do that soon.

Best regards

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

EmpServe Kenya like your idea on helping graduating students transit...

Photo of EmpServe Kenya
Team

@Deborah . Thanks. Looking forward partnering with you. Your idea is brilliant too

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks EmpServe Kenya, lets see how it goes!

Photo of Isaac Jumba
Team

Deborah Nyambu Doing a good job for the social venture space. My idea was not shortlisted but I definitely look for ways we can collaborate. I'm already holding startup and design thinking workshops in universities and the feedback is quite impressive

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hello Isaac, good to hear from you.  We will be glad to hear more about the feedback you are getting from your workshops, how can we link up?

Photo of Isaac Jumba
Team

My email is isaacjumba@gmail.com. We could definitely meet up. Thanks

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Isaac...

Photo of Kianna
Team

Deborah, 

The name of our idea is simply titled after our organization, "Health 2 Humanity." Let me know if you have any interest in partnering by emailing me at estenson@h2hsoap.org! 

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Kianna, will do that.

Photo of Kianna
Team

Hi Deborah, 
I love the mission of your organization, as it shares a common platform with my own organization called Health 2 Humanity aimed at entrepreneurial skill development in youths throughout Kenya, Uganda, and Ghana. We have successfully implemented 12 start up businesses centered around hygiene products, and employed 28 entrepreneurs in these regions by teaching them business skills, financial literacy, and sustainability practices that have allowed their businesses to flourish self-sustainably. Check out our website at h2hglobal.org and email me at estenson@h2hsoap.org if you'd be interested in looking at ways to partner!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Kianna, its good to hear from you!  Kindly remind me the title of your idea in the challenge,would really love to have a look at it.  Best regards.   

Photo of Audrey Cheng
Team

This is wonderful! 
Possible collaboration with Ongoza?

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Audrey...definately, I have taken the contacts, will keep in touch...

Photo of John V. Kimario
Team

1.Bravo Deborah! Thanks for the rich ideas around social entrepreneurship;  specifically the school and sports component. I should join the team of experts immediately!
2.You correctly noted.: Youth tend to put more emphasis on the business aspect of it,, is this not natural: when the purse swells many social relations and  issues tend to be drowned do you foresee  any leeway out of this tendency back home... 

Photo of YOTRAC
Team

Great idea Deborah. Our idea is in the same line of social entrepreneurship in agribusiness.
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/youth-empowerment-challenge/ideas/agro-investment-for-the-youth-yai

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks, YOTRAC...yes it is in the same line...great idea you have there too!

Photo of Daniel Ameny
Team

Social entrepreneurship is such an important tool to meet the needs of the communities while making money in the process. This is a very idea for the East African Youth.

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

I totally agree...thanks Daniel.

Photo of Maria Valls Casanovas
Team

Hi Deborah, 

I really like your idea and the way you and your team are improving youth in Africa. By the way, I really think that using the sports to empower the situation of the country it's very worth and will help to improve the situation of young people and Africa and to create communities who can help each other. 

Congrats!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Maria.  Indeed, sports is a good youth empowering tool and it always brings communities together.   Congrats to you too!  

Photo of Inge de Dreu
Team

Hi Deborah, I see you are doing some interesting work... would love to connect some time around the theme of entrepreneurship. 

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hi Inge de Dreu, nice to hear from you!  Thank you, it will be great to link up and maybe team up around that theme with you...I like your idea as well, its not so far off from ours! 

Photo of Enouce Ndeche
Team

I like the fantastic work that you guys are doing towards empowering the youth of Kenya.That's the way to as we build a responsible nation!!!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Enouce!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Savio Great idea you have there on innovation hub...keep it up!

Photo of Enouce Ndeche
Team

Hi Deb-yeah,sports can act like a vehicle..Your program looks great..I like what you guys are doing.

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thanks Enouce!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hi Enouce, it will be nice to receive an applaude from you...will kinda motivate us?

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Francis kim Indeed, youth economic empowerment is the way to go!

Photo of Peter Ellery
Team

I think the approach you are using is very strong here Deborah. You have two key values that I personally believe are essential to success. You focus on a "core" economy (i.e., what motivates the person internally rather than through money or income) approach to career and work pursuits in the youth you are helping, and you start this process in the schools where others can see and learn through the modeling of the behavior. Some great ideas here ... well done.

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Peter, I really appreciate your kind comments...

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Hi Peter, it will be nice to receive an applaude from you...will go a long way in motivating us!  Thanks!

Photo of Nicodemus Siayi Soko Axwessoo
Team

Thank you Debora;You are indeed the changer and Girls will truly be way to solve the problem for older population.I like you idea and thank for your comments;you are welcome.

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Thank you Nicodemus, I appreciate your kind comments.

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Nicodemus Siayi Soko Axwessoo Indeed, empowering a girl is like empowering the whole community...

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Ruganzu Bruno I like your idea on the amusement park for children...interesting!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Enouce Ndeche Yap, sometimes the best way to empower them is through sports!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Fladwel Rawinji Hey, what do you think?

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Jared B Agreed...a lot of impact takes place when youth start changing their own world!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Amos Entrepreneurship using e-skills is the way to go! 

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Peter Ellery A great leap into the future through learning...great idea!

Photo of Deborah Nyambu
Team

Femi Entrepreneurship with problem solving skills is the way to go indeed!