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The New Grad Hiring Process - Feedback is Key

Employers should respond to every applicant (especially those looking for entry-level positions) with constructive feedback, both out of civic responsibility and self-interest in tailoring potential employees.

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Written by DeletedUser

One of the common themes among young people who can't seem to find gainful employment is the vacuum of meaningful feedback from potential employers; resumés from undesired applicants are simply discarded, and it is assumed that those applicants will "just figure it out," "it" being both the rejection of the application and the reason why. From the applicants' point of view, they are simply sending off resumés into the void, hoping that someone somewhere will provide them with more than a brush-off.

It is unreasonable to expect someone with no meaningful experience in the workforce to know why they weren't chosen for a job or what to do about it. It's also unreasonable to expect a perfect match for an entry-level position without letting those individuals who aren't qualified know what they need to work on.

In this concept, it is proposed that employers accept the duty of responding to every entry-level applicant who wants to work at their company without fail, explaining to rejected applicants what traits they need to develop in order to pursue employment with the company.

How will your concept support young people as they transition into the world of work?

Feedback will render the process of application for employment less vacuous and stab-in-the-dark-ish, informing young people of what skills/characteristics/qualities they need to get the jobs they want & providing employers with a mechanism to improve the quality incoming candidates. Suggestions for avenues of improvement will provide clear courses of action for young people to pursue, instead of depending on their educational institutions to keep in touch with industry trends.

What online or in-person components of your concept will best support this transition?

As per Ashley's suggestion, a low-cost implementation of this system could be achieved via an online database of skills which employers and employees could pull from to describe what they might bring to a job, instead of the non-standardized verbiage used in advertisements. A rejected application would be returned with both a checklist of unfulfilled requirements and suggestions of how to remedy any deficiency for that position. Applicants who don't get invited back for a second interview could be informed in a follow-up phone interview (or, if they've been eliminated as potential candidates, during their in-person interview) what isn't clicking with the employer.

My Virtual Team

Thanks to Ashley's suggestion for a database-based implementation of the idea, and to David Payne for finding Nathan's "Interviews as Teaching Moments" concept.

Attachments (1)

new-grad-hiring-process.pdf

The New Grad Hiring Process

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DeletedUser

Hey Josh, this sounds wonderful! You should check out Nathan's concept of Job interviews as teaching moments: http://www.openideo.com/open/youth-employment/concepting/job-interviews-as-learning-moments/

and Paul's great employer registry: http://www.openideo.com/open/youth-employment/concepting/the-great-employer-register/

I think both have really interesting ideas that you can incorporate into your concept.

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DeletedUser

Thanks for those recommendations! Nathan's idea is directly related, but I'm not sure how Paul's "Great Employer Registry" would apply to this concept; could you elaborate?

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DeletedUser

So Paul's idea could provide a possible way of incentivizing employers to do what you are talking about. By having a yelp-esque site for employers, job applicants could review employers on a number of aspects including whether they provided constructive feedback after the interview/application, didn't send their resume into limbo and actually responded, etc. Employers would want good reviews to attract applicants and so might be more inclined to provide helpful feedback.

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DeletedUser

Instead of providing constructive feedback by email or web I think it's better to invite the applicant for coffee or a short meeting at the studio/ work place. This solves two problems, first the applicant must show some commitment to the job to deserve a feedback. Second, communication in person is more efficient and more engaging, it can show the employer how smart the candidate really is.

I think a yelp style web application will increase employer stress, which is something no one would like to have. Employment is about connecting people, not connecting services to people then back to services.

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