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Now is a Rare Chance to Do Voluntary Service

Longing to be employed makes you depressed? Please don’t think you’re wasting your time. Participation in voluntary service can be a chance to practice professional skills, open your eyes to new opportunities or even enrich your CV.

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Applying and seeking jobs may take time and patience which needs extra self confidence, new ideas or deep thoughts to know oneself and the world better. This may be a rare chance in one’s life to do something meaningful, such as voluntary service. Waiting for an interview call may be a general excuse for it, but the time length of voluntary service varies as short as 2 weeks to longer than a year.

From language, computer skills or design skills, any of your capabilities can be considered useful. Even simple labor can be a great help for those in need. Voluntary service may be a great chance to practice or prove one’s profession or knowledge.

The beauty of voluntary work is that you get more than you give while serving others. Not only emotional satisfaction, stepping and living in the new environment you get to serve can be a time to gain insight. For instance, while voluntary service, discovering that used cars are widely preferred in Russia because of low price, gave a new business idea to export used cars from Japan or Korea.

A friend of mine who was majoring engineering came along on a mission trip to Russia Kamchatka for voluntary service. For 2 weekswe fixed basketball stands and served kids in Sunday school. Not to mention the emotional fulfillment of the members, this guy went further. He joined on a couple more voluntary services before graduation and eventually got a work in KOICA, a Koreangovernment agency which supports developing countries for sustainable growth with ODA. ‘I believe I can contribute more to sustainability than working as an engineer’, he said.

Another elderly friend, in his early 40s, who went along quit his job as a car sales person and became a missionary to serve in Russia Saint Petersburg after this particular mission trip. Well, not everyone gets out of the usual track, but who knows how much the experience may change you?

Voluntary service does contribute to a richer CV and tells more about oneself. Consider this as another opportunity to practice or build up your career.

 


 

How will your concept support young people as they transition into the world of work?

- a chance and time to think and act sustainability and gain deep thoughts - a way to gain experience or test talents - learn about different parts of the world and gain insights

What online or in-person components of your concept will best support this transition?

http://ivsgb.org/info/ http://www.koica.go.kr/ http://worldrelief.org/

My Virtual Team

Anybody is welcome for suggestions or discussions :)

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DeletedUser

Great thoughts! I wanted to pass on that several non-profits that work with homeless or at-risk youth use volunteering as a springboard for paid jobs. Through even very basic volunteering, people can learn the basics of the working world including showing up on time, working a full day, asking their supervisor questions and for direction, etc. Through volunteering, they get something on their resume and are more prepared to enter the working world. Your idea is based more on how volunteering can support more complex skill and knowledge development but it can also be used for the multitudes that need the most basic skills and knowledge related to the working world.

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DeletedUser

@David Payne Great thing you pointed out there. Giving young people chances to experience the sense of 'system', just like working in a company, can be gained from voluntary work. The better thing about these experience in voluntary work is that they can ask for other roles to join in.
Well, it's rather a case of compulsory work but my husband learnt all the administration & paper work in the army, and the experience helped him to work in office afterwards.

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DeletedUser

Great idea. I do think this is an often overlooked area, and one I can say from personal experience definitely works. I actually quit my job and spent some time volunteering for Engineers without Borders. When I returned I found everyone was really keen to chat to me about it in interviews and it really helped to portray me as a much more rounded individual... and to get the interviews in the first place.
Also, one of the hidden benefits is that work such as this often allows people to take on more responsibility, and manage a broader scope of activities than they would in a more usual corporate environment. A great talking point to simply prove your skills and gain experience of, not only your area of education, but of management and organisation and other things.

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DeletedUser

Great to know your valuable experience, especilly the fact that it helped your interview. BTW, is there any volunteering opportunities or organizations like 'Engineers without Borders' or 'Doctors without Borders' for designers?

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DeletedUser

@Minji... I'm afraid I haven't come across any design specific roles, but if you are a more technical designer then I think there are definitely opportunities. EWB works a little differently in every country, but I know that in the UK there are a few more design based roles - such as one with SELCO in India working to design/develop/build tools for local farmers, and the project I did to build and test a motorcycle ambulance service (fabricating + on the spot development + ethnography), but obviously in development work you will need to be able to help take your ideas through to reality. Sorry I can't be of more help.

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DeletedUser

Leila, Thanks for the information though.

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