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Pop Up Bus (and Boat) + Innovation Centre: Centres/Training Hubs and Mobile Workshops that Pop Up in Communities Around the Globe, Building Pathways and a Network of Employment Opportunities for Youth

Joint idea between Leigh Cullen + Alex Mokori. Pop Up Buses are workshops on wheels that travel the globe, popping up in developing and developed countries to cultivate opportunities for youth while extending employment networks throughout communities along Pop Up Bus routes. Pop Up Boats replace buses when on-road travel is not accessible. Innovation Centres are hubs that pop up in communities to create sustainable 21st century skills training programs for local youth.

Photo of Leigh Cullen

Written by

25 September 2014 Update:
Click on the below links to read more about the Pop Up Bus + Innovation Centre journey, next steps, and calls to action :
Alex Mokori's Impact Story
Leigh Cullen's Impact Story

 

21 September 2014 Updates:
Alex and I had a long discussion on Google Hangout today to discuss milestones and next steps. Wekesa was set to join, but encountered an unexpected technical glitch. We will be updating the community about what's in store for the Pop Up Bus + Innovation Centre effort and how the community can help.

Our first call to action:
Alex and his team of Community Pathfinders have invested in, from personal savings, a space to meet and work. He has tables, but lacks chairs and basic office supplies. Please reach out to Alex directly if you are interested in lending a helping hand: alexkmokori@gmail.com

A special announcement:
Team member Rehmah Kasule is a winner of this year's upcoming Goldman Sachs & Fortune Global Women Leaders Award at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit in Laguna Niguel, CA. Please join us in applauding Rehmah for her human-centered and social good accomplishments that have earned her such an extraordinary honor!
www.fortuneconferences.com/most-powerful-women-summit-2014

Thanks & Please stay tuned!
#TeamPopUpBus + #InnovationCentreUganda
 

19 September 2014 Update:
Rehmah Kasule, Founder and President of CEDA and the innovator of CATHY, has generously offered her continued support of our team and efforts . Rehmah is an inspiration to all of us. We look forward to our journey together. Thank you Rehmah!
 

18 September 2014 Update:
Congrats to all #PopUpBus + #InnovationCentreUganda team members. Hats off to you. Special thanks to our team of young, professional #CommunityPathfinders who are piloting our prototype live in Uganda. And a sincere thanks to everyone on OpenIDEO who is collaborating with us and sharing inspirational suggestions and community stories. We love reading your posts. Keep them coming as we try to kickstart our first Innovation Centre in Uganda with Alex!
All best,
Leigh
 

17 September 2014 Update to Team:
Hi Team, I'm back online. As many of you know I've been out of the country. Missed all of you. Am going through all of your emails carefully.

Wekesa, Thank you for your excellent community updates! Alex, Super job on continued hard work on the pilot! We are currently connecting on a variety of items. Rehmah, Thank you for all of your emails which I am reading, and for continuing to be a guiding light. Khin, Thanks for checking in to see what you can be of assistance with.

Wekesa invited me to join the Ashoka "Collaborating to Solve Youth Employment" Google Hangout today. I encourage the rest of the team to check out the inspirational recording from the session.

All the best,
Leigh
 

Notes to the Pop Up Bus Team & OpenIDEO Community:
** During the final days of Refinement, our team continues to run a live pilot in Uganda. Alex Mokori is leading the pilot with the assistance of a team of 23 local youth (Community Pathfinders). To help us help Alex  build a sustainable "Innovation Center" (aka "Pop Up Hub") in Uganda, be sure to follow Alex's real-time pilot updates here.

Keep your suggestions & ideas coming!
#GoTeamPopUpBus and #GoTeamInnovationCenterUganda!
 

Table of Contents:
I. Live Pilot

---- Pilot Documentation
---- About the Pilot
---- Daily Pilot Summary

II. Special Thanks
III. Pop Up Bus

---- What is a Pop Up Bus
---- The Broader Vision & Measuring Outcomes
---- Onboard Facilitators
---- Community Pathfinders
---- Skills Taught by Facilitators, Pathfinders, and Mentors
---- Mentors
---- The Pop Up Bus Experience = Edutainment & the Sharing of Journeys
---- Pop Up Tech Hubs / "Innovation Centers" as Leave Behinds
---- Business Model
------------- Pop Up Bus Business Model 1: Various funding ops
------------- Pop Up Bus Business Model 2: Microwork
------------- Pop Up Tech Hub / Innovation Center Business Model: Cross-subsidy
--------------- Example of a (related) Business Model that Works (Google & Grameen Foundation's "Community Knowledge Workers' Program")
---- Prototype
---- In Sum
---- Persona Building
---- Additional Areas of Exploration
---- Research and Sources of Inspiration


 

 

I. Live Pilot

 

Pilot Documentation

 
  1. Pilot Roadmap: Working draft of Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center's Pilot Roadmap. Introduces our exceptional team of 23 Community Pathfinders. Showcases types of data being collected. Click here to access the Pilot Roadmap.
     
  2. Journey Map–Pop Up Bus + Innovation Center Uganda: This journey map is specific to our live pilot in Uganda. It notes what Alex and his team of 23 Community Pathfinders are accomplishing during the Pilot, what our goals and hurdles are, and the assumptions we are testing. Note that this is a working draft. Click here to view the Journey Map.
     
  3. Alex is drafting additional stakeholder documentation including a Problem Statement (data specific to youth unemployment issues in Uganda), Student Guidebook (youth data and pain points), Tool for Employer Partnerships (Alex's plan is to approach hospitals, NGOs, food processing industries, universities, hotels, health spas, gyms, and governments, to name a few...) Please reach out to Alex for this information.

 

About the Pilot


Alex Mokori, our Uganda Pop Up Bus Facilitator & Community Pathfinder, is leading our pilot. Alex's idea, " Innovative Centre: Fresh Ideas for Success by Youth for Youth," aligns directly with Pop Up Bus prototyping, so our teams are excited to combine efforts. Alex's Innovation Center is the equivalent to the type of sustainable "Pop Up Tech Hub" that Pop Up Bus would like to leave behind in a community. The Innovation Center is maintained by a Facilitator, just like Alex, and a team of Community Pathfinders, just like Alex's team of 23 youth. The Facilitator (Alex) and Community Pathfinders (23 youth) then provides learning and training activities to local youth, just like Alex's team plans to do.

Alex is working together with a bright team of 23 youth in Uganda who are educated in health & nutrition. The team grouped together due to a common cause: many youth on the team are frustrated because they have not been able to gain employment in the field of their choice (health & nutrition) and are supplementing incomes with forms of work unrelated to their formal education. The team's goals are, 1.) to provide soft and hard skills training and mentoring to other local youth to help youth achieve their employment goals AND 2.) to bring better health and nutrition products and services to the local community.

This special team of youth is officially our first group of Community Pathfinders. We welcome this whole team warmly. We think this approach of youth helping propel youth forward is a powerful model. The Pathfinders will work with Alex to reach out to university students to teach students soft and hard skills that will enable students to achieve employment goals. The students will be taught teamwork, entrepreneurship, business skills, product and service design, and product marketing. Students will be mentored along the way. The goal is that teams of students build viable go-to-market products and services as an outcome of these workshops. In turn, some of these products and services will help sustain the Innovation Center / Pop Up Tech Hub.

Take a moment and meet Alex and his Pathfinders. Watch them discuss Innovation Center and  Pop Up Bus here:
---  Video 1:   vimeo.com/104833910
---  Video 2:   vimeo.com/104835537
---  Video 3:   vimeo.com/104866593

Read more about our Pathfinders on  pages 1 and 2 in our Pilot Roadmap.

Alex has applied for formal funding. In the interim, he and his youth team has pooled together personal resources to help make the mission a reality. The first university Alex and his team of youth wish to work with is Kyambogo University.

Prior to reaching out to Kyambogo University, we've decided to pilot the prototype first amongst Alex's team of youth, the Pathfinders themselves. Alex is taking the lead on training the Pathfinders as coaches and mentors. Wekesa has volunteered to help Alex in person. This duo will make an invincible, dynamic team.


Daily Pilot Summary


(Ongoing): Please click here for live pilot updates from Alex himself.

(29-31 August): Leigh added a Journey Map specific to Alex's pilot. Check it out by clicking here. It notes what Alex and his team of 23 Community Pathfinders are accomplishing in Uganda, what our goals and hurdles are, and the assumptions we are testing. The focus during "Refinement" is on running this pilot in Uganda. Because we do not have a bus full of resources to help set up a local Pop Up (Tech) Hub / Innovation Center in Uganda for Alex, we narrowed our steps during Refinement to trying to solve how to create a sustainable Pop Up Hub / Innovation Center for Alex with the resources the team currently has. These resources are: Alex Mokori (team member leading the pilot), Alex's team of 23 university graduates who are youth (local Community Pathfinders), the money Alex and his team of youth have personally pooled together to kickstart the project (Alex is seeking more funding), the vast amount of research and data Alex is documenting for stakeholders, the personal skill-set each team member offers (in terms of education and skills), mentor and employer partnerships (Alex is identifying these partnerships based on his first-hand knowledge of his community), and the collective brainpower of the global Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center teams. We are learning what approaches work and don't work during the pilot. The goal is to document this information so that we have a prototype pattern that we can then test in other communities around the globe.

(29-31 August): Alex has made incredible leaps and strides in kickstarting our joint pilot:

--- Alex gathered written and video testimonials from seven of his youth team members / Community Pathfinders. Check out some of Alex's video journals here:
--- Jamiru and Ossa, two core members on Alex's team of youth, volunteered to go to Kyambogo University to identify a few students (freshman, second and third year students) to pilot the project with. The goal is to gather feedback (student pain points and stories) to help guide next steps.

--- Alex has drafted the following documents:
  • Problem Statement
  • Student Guidebook
  • Refinement Issues
  • Tool for Employers (his plan is to approach hospitals, NGOs, food processing industries, universities, hotels, health spas, gyms, and governments)
     
--- Alex is thinking through pain points and working with Dave to create an experience map.

(30 August): Alex, Rehmah and I brainstorm how to sustain Alex's Innovation Center. Rehmah suggested a product plan that may be able to partner with Alex's initiative in order to sustain the Innovation Center.

(28 August):
Wekesa forwarded our team additional planning guidelines to help us stay on track. Wekesa has been meeting with numerous tech initiatives in Kenya to discuss our pilot and to gather ideas, suggestions and feedback.

(27 August): Alex shared the indirect questioning, storytelling, and mind-mapping techniques he is currently using to start the pilot off (and to create vibrant conversations) with his team of 23 (youth) Community Pathfinders. Alex introduced us to this admirable team of youth.  Check the Pilot Roadmap out here.

(27 August): I quickly outlined recommendations for types and forms of information to collect throughout the pilot to help guide prototype iterations, business modeling, and sharing the pilot journey with OpenIDEO.  Check the Pilot Roadmap out here.

 

 

Special Thanks


Thanks to Wekesa Zablon. Wekesa is our very first Pop Up Bus Facilitator & Community Pathfinder. Wekesa is based in Kenya and runs his own startup Jibonde Fresh. Wekesa's tireless, positive energy keeps us all excited. His business and tech savvy provides the team with a wealth of real-time community research, info on local tech trends, and an array of solid ideas and suggestions each step of the way. Be sure to check out his blog here:
weke-ziggy.tumblr.com

Thanks to Alex Mokori. Alex is our Pop Up Bus Facilitator & Community Pathfinder based in Uganda. Alex is rapidly building out a business plan and is leading a truly admirable charge on the pilot of both Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center with a team of 23 local youth Community Pathfinders. Our team is actively brainstorming how to help Alex with his goal of launching a sustainable Innovation Center in Uganda. Follow Alex's pilot updates here, and please help us help him:
https://openideo.com/challenge/youth-employment-pathways/ideas/fresh-ideas-for-success

Thanks to Alex's bright team of 23 youth from Uganda. This team of youth is Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center's first team of Community Pathfinders. We see them as trailblazers. This inspired team is working together with Alex to help build better employment pathways for other local youth. Check out the group's brainstorming sessions on Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center here on Vimeo:
Video 1:  vimeo.com/104833910
Video 2:  vimeo.com/104835537
Video 3:  vimeo.com/104866593

Thanks to Rehmah Kasule. Any team is lucky to have an outstanding mentor. I see Rehmah as the Pop Up Bus Team Mentor. Rehmah provides the team with her valuable insights as a leader and social entrepreneur. She is a consistent source of inspiration and advice. Rehmah and Alex recently met with the President of Kenya to advance the issue of youth employment. Rehmah's proven initiatives are a testament to her noteworthy abilities. Check out her company CEDA and her CATHY initiative.

Thanks to Khin Tye. Khin provided our team with a variety of excellent youth mentoring strategies, including KoKreation. KoKreation encourages youth to think past personal limitations and to visualize who they want to be. Youth partner with other youth and professional mentors to perform actionable, skill-based steps to help the youth reach their future goals. Check out pages 7-12 in our prototype to view Khin's excellent work.

Thanks to Dan Kolodziej. Dan built a microwork business model suggestion for our team. "Its value proposition is its ability to source projects from the likes of Google, LinkedIn and Microsoft and to recruit and manage labour in developing countries. It also adds value by being to break apart large projects into manageable short-­term pieces of work (and teaches youth 21st century computer skills)." Also, be sure to check out Dan's Delfee project.

 

 

What is a Pop Up Bus?

 
A Pop Up Bus is a repurposed school bus (or any type of bus*) converted into a classroom/workshop that administers employment and pathways assistance to developing and developed communities through which the bus travels. The bus, 1) pops up in a community, 2) assesses the community’s specific needs, 3) trains Community Pathfinders (local youth, who in turn train their community on an ongoing basis), 4) leaves behind tools (including a Pop Up Tech Hub / Innovation Center when applicable) to assist the community, 5) and travels on to another community. Building local, regional, and global connection points,  maintaining interconnectivity, and leveraging the global Pop Up Bus network are themes. 
* Groups online exist that request and accept donated buses for goodwill purposes.
 

The Broader Vision & Measuring Outcomes

 
Even when a Pop Up Bus departs one community to journey to another, onboard Facilitators continue to check in on communities they have already popped up in, to gauge progress and to provide communities with a broader set of connections from the network of communities the bus pops up in. A Pop Up Bus arrival isn’t a one-time community event. The bus will return to a community, after traveling to nearby communities, to measure outcomes and to provide further aid. Eventually, the bus can provide transportation to new opportunities in other cities for youth who have clearly lined up work outside of their home communities via the Pop Up Bus employment network. As Pop Up Bus training takes root in communities and starts to flourish, then each bus can publish a schedule when the bus plans to arrive and depart local and regional communities. 
 

Onboard Facilitators

 
Onboard the bus are Facilitators. Facilitators wear multiple hats. When Facilitators arrive in a community, they work with the community to select Community Pathfinders. (Pathfinders live in the community and are elected by their community to the role of Community Pathfinder.) Facilitators work closely with Pathfinders to customize pathways of opportunity for the community based on the community’s specific needs. Facilitators understand the community and culture with whom they work with, are versed in the the types of services the Pop Up Bus can provide for the community, and train Pathfinders and the community how to use those services. Facilitators also share success stories from their Pop Up Bus journeys (and from other Facilitators who are deployed around the world), employment information from along the Pop Up Bus route (and from around the world if applicable), and connect youth to other youth, to educators, to mentors, and to employers.

Pulled a fabulous quote from Anne-Laure which summarizes the power of leveraging the Pop Up Bus network. Anne-Laure says, "(The Pop Up Bus network can be leveraged) within regions, countries, continents - as well as across. I can imagine some of the Facilitators participating in different routes or even some of the local Community Pathfinders having the opportunity to go and visit another community (within their country or abroad), or maybe even becoming Facilitators."
 

Community Pathfinders

 
Cultural beliefs and economic constraints will drive nomination of local Pathfinders in each community. Wherever/whenever appropriate, youth should be nominated and trained as Pathfinders. This gives youth opportunity to acquire a range of skills they can then transfer/teach to other youth within their community as part of the Pathfinder role. These skillsets will help youth obtain other jobs within or outside of their community.  The role of the Pathfinder, with the assistance of Facilitators, is to go out into the community and investigate what types of skills youth in the community need most. Facilitators then tailor a training program to the community and teach Pathfinders the skills necessary to help instruct the youth within their community. In some instances, Facilitators will continue to assist Pathfinders in training the community. And in some instances, Mentors from the community will be brought in to provide insights and valuable networking opportunities for youth.
 

Skills Taught by Facilitators, Pathfinders, and Mentors


The skills taught are dependent on community need. Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs" shows that basic needs (food, water, safety, shelter...) must be met first. Different skillsets taught could be:
  • farming / agriculture
  • healthcare for women and girls
  • basic numeracy & literacy via mobile – similar to Stepping Stone's approach
  • microwork
  • soft skills
  • hard skills
  • a vocation / trade (ex. woodworking, plumbing)
  • how to professionally network
  • resume drafting, job application etiquette, professional networking
  • basic computer programming (ex. HTML, CSS, basic Javascript, or perhaps utilize preexisting training like Codecademy.com)
  • advanced technology (ex. a course in HTML5 OR a course in CAD)
  • new technology workshops (what new tech employers are embracing and how to use it)
  • short workshops (ex. UI/UX for Beginners)
  • learning tracks that bring in local professionals/mentors to teach what goes into a specific career trajectory (ex. "What goes into being an Engineer & Who Works with Engineers on a Daily Basis" OR "What goes into being a Designer & Potential Designer Career Tracks")
  • hands-on "maker" tracks that teach youth to 1. build a product and then 2) learn how to form a business plan around the product and 3) how to brand and market the product (See prototype for sample maker tracks in engineering, health, the arts, and science.)
  • leadership and entrepreneurship development
 

Mentors

 
Mentors can be elected by Facilitators, Pathfinders, and the community. Research suggests that if youth elect a Mentor from within their own social networks, the mentor relationship sustains better than other types of mentor relationships (ie, mentors selected by another party for youth). That said, this still gives local businesses and individuals (who have the capacity to help youth build skills and find employment) a great opportunity to get involved as Mentors. Mentors can also contribute by outfitting Pop Up Buses and boats with technology and resources beneficial to building opportunities.
 

The Pop Up Bus Experience = "Edu-tainment" (Rehmah's term) & the Sharing of Journeys (Meena's idea)


Edutainment
Just when is Pop Up Bus coming to your community? – Pop Up Bus is a fun, anticipated learning experience, aka "edu-tainment." Rehmah's excellent suggestion: "Consider experiential learning to keep participants interested. Example: In marketing we do road shows where a bus/truck goes into communities and people gather, they set up a stage and interact with audience for 3-4 hours and move to another community. Because of the fun and learning (edu-tainment), by the time the bus arrives people have already gathered waiting. So by all means incoporate music, drama, role playing, video and audio."

Though Pop Up Bus would be in a community for longer than 3-4 hours, this is the type of experience we want to build into any learning activities hosted by a Pop Up Bus. This idea aligns with the idea of teaching youth to never be afraid to "play" to build professional, creative confidence.

"Play" defined by IDEO's Tim Brown:
"Tim Brown talks about the powerful relationship between creative thinking and play."
www.ted.com/talks/tim_brown_on_creativity_and_play

Sharing Journeys via Video
And Meena's solid idea: the strength of sharing individual youth journeys (and community journeys) via video as part of the Pop Up Bus experience. Facilitators and Pathfinders record, via video, youth stories from within a community. This samples the "local identity." These videos are then shared along a Pop Up Bus' route and with the global network of Pop Up Bus youth. As Meena says, this is "partly to inspire and partly to highlight the divergence and convergence of the identities of (communities and youth wihin those communities)." The sharing of journeys – from hardships, to milestones, to accomplishments – can spark inspiration. When a young person sees that another young person has a similar struggle to their own, it can make that struggle more approachable and doable. And it can sometimes transcend any cultural barriers or differences.

Social Media Channels
Pop Up Bus will have a set of active social media channels (YouTube, Vimeo, Twitter, Facebook, Linked In) through which it will engage with youth, employers and mentors. The social media experience includes hashtag #PoppinUp. The goal is to build momentum on a global youth conversation on employment and pathway needs within their communities. Example of hashtag use, “Danny here. Recent uni design grad. #PoppinUp from Dublin, IRL. Hard time landing 1st job.”

As Alex says, "I know for sure students love classy and trendy things especially if it is linked to publicity. Public commitment and a photo board placed inside the bus would act as cue to action to others who get on board to do something about the issue being discussed... It is even better if this bus is video recorded and played on TV and YouTube to get a large audience to learn about it and want to get on board. Create 'MiniBuzz.'"
 

Pop Up Tech Hubs / "Innovation Centers" as Leave Behinds

 
Attached (hitched via trailer) to each Pop Up Bus is a Pop Up Tech Hub / Innovation Center that can be assembled easily and left in each community to create a local hub in which people can congregate, learn, and share information. The goal of these locally planted hubs is to: share employment information (local, nearby, or in other cities) and to provide training for youth across a variety of skillsets. The skillsets trained are based on the needs of the community. Skills can include: farming, healthcare, basic numeracy and literacy, “trade school” skills, soft and hard skills, basic and advanced technology, and much more. These “leave behind” Pop Up workshops may work best in developing countries. In the case of developed countries, the workshops can be held within companies who are willing to open their doors to youth skills training.
 

Business Model


The goals are: 1) to keep Pop Up Bus free of charge to youth, 2) to generate salary sources for youth and local Community Pathfinders, 3) to teach youth skills relevant for 21st century jobs. We agree with Rehmah that the business model should be run as a social enterprise.

Pop Up Bus Business Model 1:   Click here to view.
Also located in documents section of post.
Stat: Working draft that folds in input from team members – including Khin, Wekesa, Rehmah, and myself. Doc summarized below:

Funding opportunities:
  1. BIG DATA: World aid organizations, governments, and companies seeking better tracked youth employment data in developing and developed countries. Real-time field data collected by Pop Up Bus Facilitators and Pathfinders would be shared via form based data collection software like Open Data Kit (http://youtu.be/HqqUdfz9Uyc). Examples: World Health Organization, World Bank, USAID, UN and/or UN-Habitat's Urban Youth Fund, mEducation Alliance, governments, local companies
  2. PHILANTHROPY: Philanthropic organizations who wish to donate funding in turn for being able to publicize (and draw attention to) philanthropic initiatives.
  3. BRAND AWARENESS: Brands who have a social mission can brand the interiors and exteriors of the Pop Up Buses and Hubs, and participate in onboard (and hub) advertising opportunities. This spreads brand awareness. Examples: TOMS, Coca-Cola, Warby Parker, One Laptop Per Child, One World Futbol Project, IKEA
  4. PARTNERSHIPS WITH TECH GIANTS WHO HAVE SOCIAL INITIATIVES IN PROGRESS NOW: Tech giants who have current, related social initiatives underway may wish to pair with Pop Up Bus for even greater impact. Examples: Google + Grameen Foundation's "Community Knowledge Worker's Program" and Facebook + Airtel's internet.org.
  5. SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE MISSION PRODUCT PARTNERSHIPS: Companies who build sustainable products as part of their product line and corporate mission. This demonstrates social responsibility as corporate mission. Examples: Fenix International's "ReadySet Solar Kit," Samasource's microwork programs, Stepping Stone's mobile learning (basic literacy and numeracy).
  6. MICROWORK: Microwork is a way to teach basic 21st century tech skills within developing countries. Various partnerships could be leveraged. Please check out our microwork business model by clicking here. 


Pop Up Bus Business Model 2: Click here to view.
Also located in documents section of post.
Thoughtful business model from Dan that focuses on microworking.
Stat: Working draft.


Pop Up Hub / Innovation Center Business Model:
Our team is brainstorming how to build a sustainable Pop Up Tech Hub / Innovation Center within a community. Specifically, we are focused on Alex Mokori's current efforts in Uganda to launch this very type of hub / center. One discussion we are having focuses on the concept of cross-subsidy–building a secondary product or service that the center offers for a fee. Our goal is to maintain youth training as a free service for youth. One of Alex's goals is that the youth who participate in training at the center will work together as teams to launch viable health and nutrition services and products that then help sustain the center / hub. Prior to that happening, we are brainstorming alternate services Alex could offer. Rehmah suggested the following: 
"Alex could do a low cost outlet, but with great branding where a doctor comes in to check people for diseases like high blood pressure, stomach ulcers, diabetes, etc – for free. People will sign up to get continuous information, but at the same time for consumer health snacks, drinks, porridges, etc, that Alex's nutritionists make. Then we can introduce network marketing where youth sell products and get a commission. My point is Alex has to introduce some products, not just information. Information here is valued as a direct link to either a job or a business."


Example of a related business model that works:
Came across insightful article on Grameen Foundation's partners (Google and MTN) which I wanted to share. It's a model that works in Uganda and in other developing countries. Related notes below:
https://www.google.com/earth/outreach/stories/grameen.html

Google partnered with Grameen Foundation on Grameen’s Community Knowledge Workers (CKWs) Program to collect and disseminate real-time, pertinent information for agriculture/farming sustainability in Uganda. 

The CKWs (local farmers):
“Community Knowledge Workers are trained to 1) provide a link to agricultural research institutions and extension services and administer surveys and 2) to set up off-grid electrical charging micro-enterprises using solar energy. These enterprises can earn them as much as $40 USD/month, versus the$1.25 USD/day previously earned by 60% of CKWs.”

Additional Partners:
  • MTN Uganda
  • Salesforce
  • Grameen-AppLab

Structure + Tools:
  • uses proliferation of mobile phones in developing countries
  • Android based
  • uses Open Data Kit (http://opendatakit.org) -- form based data collection
  • uses Google Maps API

More on Open Data Kit (form based workflow for field data collection):
http://youtu.be/HqqUdfz9Uyc

Value Added Services for ODK:
  • Nafundi
  • Dimagi
  • Mindflow
  • Mega Six
  • Seeing Swans
  • (and over 20 more)
 

Prototype V1: Rough, Working Draft


Click here to view the Prototype 
Also located in documents section of this post.

As we pilot the prototype with youth, we will update it with our observations and with user feedback. The final prototype will be designed and presented in a user friendly manner. 

The goal of the Pop Up Bus prototype is for its design to be universal enough to be used within, and adapted to, any community around the globe (by Facilitators, Community Pathfinders, and Mentors).  

Ways our team is brainstorming how to pilot the prototype:
  • Alex is currently piloting the project in Uganda with a team of 23 youth
  • Wekesa has an idea for a social media chat with youth in Kenya
  • Pri has volunteered to test the project in 8 villages in India (Nov-Jan) 
  • Dan has university lecturing experience and is considering how to build a Pop Up Bus learning experience into that framework
 

In Sum

 
As a Pop Up Bus travels from one community to another, the onboard Facilitators maintain contact with Facilitators around the globe and with local Pathfinders and Mentors. This creates an extensive professional network for youth anywhere around the globe to tap into. – It is a network of shared experiences and skills from which to teach youth and a wealth of professional opportunities that can be shared from village to village, community to community, city to city, and country to country. Youth become change instigators themselves and are armed with a variety of skillsets that not only are used to help their community flourish, but to propel youth to achieve their objectives.

 

 

Persona Building


Examples of how Pop Up Bus builds pathway opportunities in various communities.
 
By no means are the below examples an exhaustive list of “community types.” As stated above, each community has different needs for youth that must be researched and opportunities must be tailored to each community to meet those needs. Each person helped within a community is a positive ripple, and is progress.
 
I’m open to any and all inputs as I build out examples below:
 
Example 1:  A small, agriculturally sustained village in developing country.  Using Grameen Foundation’s Community Knowledge Workers (CKWs) Program in Uganda as a guidepost/example that works.

Pathfinders: Local farmers voted in as CKWs/Pathfinders by their village.
Process: Pathfinders given mobile technology with data about livestock and crops disease. Local farmers consult Pathfinders.
Pathways: Local farms become sustainable. Nearby villages elect Pathfinders. More farming information is input into the system, making the network of information even wider. The persistent well-being of farmers, and their farms, becomes a greater reality.
 

Example 2: A larger sized community in a developing country. The community isn’t well connected. Residents aren’t aware of employment opportunities that exist within the community. Most men in each household have a mobile phone, although women usually don’t. Basic literacy and numeracy needs to be taught to women and girls.
We're excited that Priyanka is working on this for us. She's visiting India later this year and plans to formally build this out. Check her comments out here.
 


Example 3: Big city in developing country - built out by Rehmah
Rehmah is sharing a "real world" example with us. Thanks Rehmah!
 

Example 4: Small town in a developed country. Local businesses are small. Youth seek to connect to larger cities. - built out by Khin, inspired by the  Youth Bus in Worchestershire England model

Pathfinders: Youth volunteers, preferably those already active in school volunteering, community centres or churches
Process: Pathfinders publicise the bus and events, see section on 'How you can help us' in the Youth Bus example. Pathfinders can also join in tours by the City buses.
Pathways: Pathfinders would have the finger on the pulse of the most pressing youth concern and issue. They can share what they had learned in the tour on the City buses. Everything else as you had described eg. CV writing, skills-training can be offered on the bus. Youth Bus also offered sessions on sex education, health and drugs.

 

Example 5: Big city in a developed country. Inner city, at-risk youth.
Pathfinders: Local youth volunteers who are active in community centres or churches. Also tap into local university science, tech, art, design, and engineering (etc) clubs.
Process: Inner city youth may not have access to affordable education. Spread info about Pop Up Bus via word of mouth. Post info in local eateries and in locations youth hang out.
Pathways: 21st century skills training is provided where it was otherwise inaccessible. Local youth meet at a Pop Up Bus and have access to professional mentors from within the city. Mentors help youth clearly visualize actionable next steps to achieve employment goals. The youth also meet local university students who help provide skills training and mentorship. Workshops could be "maker" based–build a product together with a team based on your common interests. Additional instruction about resume drafting and professional networking would be given. Youth can continue to tap into this formed network as they take the steps necessary to progress.
 

Example 5: Big city in a developed country. Educated youth.
Pathfinders: Local youth active in local tech Meetups and University clubs. 
Process: Youth meet at Pop Up Bus. 1:1 sessions with mentors may be provided based on youth specific career interests. Youth are paired into teams to learn a combination of soft and hard skills like teamwork, how to build a product, and how to create a business and marketing strategy for the product. Additional workshops may be offered onboard the bus like resume drafting, job application etiquette, professional networking, basic computer programming (ex. HTML, CSS, basic Javascript, or perhaps utilize preexisting training like Codecademy.com), advanced technology (ex. a course in HTML5 OR a course in CAD), new technology workshops (what new tech employers are embracing and how to use it), short workshops (ex. UI/UX for Beginners), etc.
Pathways: Youth have access to a variety of 21st century tech skills that they may not have acquired in school. Youth gain critical soft skills that will make their resume more attractive to employers. Youth can soak in skills from one another and from mentors.

 


Additional Areas of Exploration


From team and OpenIDEO community
  • From Khin and Paul: consider retired adults as mentors
  • From Jes: Check out SmartTXTBK technology
  • From Karolle: Explore Junior Achievement as potential partner. "Their high school programs are all about exploring careers and trying out entrepreneurial projects. I think there's an opportunity there to build a pop-up initiative that bridges their curriculum (that exploration phase) with actual employment opportunities. Pre-college summer employment perhaps?"
  • From Karolle and Allison: Consider schools as partner orgs
  • From Allison: "One possible funding model could be a university sponsoring a K-12 educational vehicle that focuses on girls, who too often lack access to education in many parts of the world. The bus would complete its route systematically so that girls who are unable to get to a traditional school can earn credits in a safe and reliable place, and be on the pathway to higher education and higher income. Would need to research the feasibility of whether or not the university/sponsor is paid back over time if employment is achieved. In whatever form it ultimately takes, the Pop Up Bus has the potential to contribute to regional workforce development through ascending levels education."
  • From Karolle: Check out Agastya's pop up training model: http://www.agastya.org  
  • From Hima: Check out "Digital Green" edutainment videos
  • From Rehmah: Add Coca-Cola to business doc - as potential partner / source of funding. Check out their 5by20 campaign (a campaign to employ 5 million women by 2020 all over the world.) 
  • http://www.coca-colacompany.com/stories/5by20
  • From Rehmah: Adding #3 scenario (Big City, Developing Country)
  • From Rehmah: Check out this "edutainment" model, building the element of fun and play into the Pop Up Bus experience
  • Example: http://biztechiq.com/
  • Researching Khin's "memes" idea -- does this structure enable us to create a user acquisition approach for early adopoters (and partners) that applies to both developing and developed countries
  • From Wekesa: shared Theory of Change Workbook (reviewing our assumptions)
  • From Wekesa: add government partnerships to business model
  • Working on toolkit with Pri, that Pri can use while she is in India and gathering data for #TeamPopUpBus
  • From Meena and Hima: Check out video journal idea (to share amongst Pop Up Bus communities) -- Digital Green as example: http://www.digitalgreen.org
  • From Leigh: add potential source of funding to business docs: the idea of allowing working professionals to purchase tickets to ride on Pop Up Bus from one community to another. A source of basic transport for professionals who can potentially use tech on board Pop Up Bus during travel.
  • From Leigh: add another source of funding to business docs: education/workshops (for a fee) for current business professionals.
 
 

Research & Sources of Inspiration:

 
Primary sources of research inspiration are Grameen Foundation (and the ReadySet Solar renewable energy product by Fenix International), Stepping Stone, Samasource, and Millennial Trains Project.

Grameen Foundation's Community Knowledge Workers (CKW) Program’s business model is notable. Here’s how it works: Grameen provides free of charge “agricultural extension information via a growing network of CKW’s in 15 districts across Uganda” with 400,000 pieces of information delivered to farmers. A type of “contract is established with each village. The contract requests that the villagers elect the CKW who will provide the villagers with timely info. In return, the villagers give the CKW’s their time. Time meaning: allowing CKW’s and Grameen to survey the community. Grameen then helps other organizations with data analysis, reporting, and real-time dashboard design. With that fee-for-service model, Grameen can then do more good out in the field.” Grameen customizes mobile tech with data around crops and livestock disease specific to the community. The CKW’s use the mobile tech to help the village create sustainable farms and sources of income.  Results: “Over 700 CKW’s share vital agricultural information with farmers across Uganda using smartphones. More than 70% adopt improved farming techniques as a result. The CKW’s are respected in their communities.”
http://www.grameenfoundation.org/what-we-do/agriculture/community-knowledge-worker
Renewable energy used for mobile tech: 
http://www.fenixintl.com/usa-canada/


Stepping Stone “delivers high impact learning and training materials on low cost mobile phones and tablets – even in remote, hard to reach locations.” Stepping Stone technology enables one to: “learn to read in your local language, improve your farming techniques, become a successful entrepreneur or learn how to grow your business.” 
http://sstone.edc.org


Samasource “is an innovative social business that connects women and youth living in poverty to dignified work via the Internet (via microwork).”
http://samasource.org


The Millennial Trains Project is a “crowd-funded transcontinental train journey that pairs young innovators and mentors.” Their mission is “to enable (youth) participants and virtual audiences to identify, evaluate, and explore emerging opportunities and challenges in communities where our trains stop while advancing a project that benefits, serves, and inspires others.”
http://millennialtrain.co


Mobile Workshop Examples:
Standford d.school's SparkTruck - link from Gavin
http://sparktruck.org
and resources
http://sparktruck.org/resources

Youth Bus in Worchestershire England - link from Khin
http://www.wychavon.gov.uk/youthbus

'"Brilliant Bus' shrinking digital divide" #CNNHero
http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/04/us/cnnheroes-pyfrom-brilliant-bus/

"Girls are I.T., Mobile Classroom & Website"
https://www.behance.net/gallery/5558216/Making-Technology-Fun-for-Girls-(Classroom-Web)

"This mobile classroom of the future can hold up to 15-students at one time and be folded up when not in use."
http://www.techeblog.com/index.php/tech-gadget/mobile-classroom

"Training Buses, Mobile Classroom Bus Hire"
http://www.roadshowpromotions.co.uk/training_bus.asp

"The C-SPAN Bus is an interactive, multi-media learning center that brings C-SPAN’s coverage of public affairs to communities nationwide and teaches students, teachers and the public."
http://www.c-span.org/about/community/


Related research:
Facebook & Airtel offering free, basic internet service to Zambia (includes job services)

Youth Initiated Mentoring

Un-Habitat’s “Urban Youth Fund”

Family, Career and Community Leaders – National Career & Tech Organization for Young People (FCCLA)

 

Icons in illustration (first image in gallery) from Nounproject:
"Bus" icon by Ilsur Aptukov
"Motorboat" by 1982
"Teacher" icon by Musavvir Ahmed

What are the next steps for implementing this idea?

The focus during Refinement is on running a pilot of the project in Uganda. Because we do not have a bus full of resources to help set up a local "Pop Up (Tech) Hub / Innovation Center" in Uganda for Alex Mokori (team member leading the pilot), we narrowed our steps during Refinement to trying to solve how to create a sustainable "Pop Up Hub / Innovation Center" for Alex with the resources the team currently has. These resources are: Alex Mokori (team member leading the pilot), Alex's team of 23 university graduates who are youth (local Community Pathfinders), the money Alex and his team of youth have personally pooled together to kickstart the project (Alex is seeking more funding), the vast amount of research and data Alex is documenting for stakeholders, the personal skill-set each team member offers (in terms of education and skills), mentor and employer partnerships (Alex is identifying these partnerships based on his first-hand knowledge of his community), and the collective brainpower of the global Pop Up Bus and Innovation Center teams. We are learning what approaches work and don't work during the pilot. The goal is to document this information so that we have a prototype pattern that we can then test in other communities around the globe.

Complete a User Experience Map. This will help you visualize how a potential end user will interact with your idea. Once you have completed it, upload it using the Upload File button at the end of this form. PDF files preferred.

  • Completed

Who does this idea benefit, who are the main players and what's in it for them?

The idea benefits youth (high school, vocational school, university, recent graduates) by providing accessible, free training and mentorship across a variety of 21st century skill-sets needed for employment. Funding opportunities: 1.) BIG DATA: World aid organizations, governments, and companies seeking better tracked youth employment data in developing and developed countries. Real-time field data collected by Pop Up Bus Facilitators and Pathfinders would be shared via form based data collection software like Open Data Kit. Examples: World Health Organization, World Bank, USAID, UN and/or UN-Habitat's Urban Youth Fund, mEducation Alliance, governments, local companies 2.) PHILANTHROPY: Philanthropic organizations who wish to donate funding in turn for being able to publicize (and draw attention to) philanthropic initiatives. 3.) BRANDS: Brands who have a social mission can brand the interiors and exteriors of the Pop Up Buses and Hubs, and participate in onboard (and hub) advertising opportunities. This spreads brand awareness. Examples: TOMS, Coca-Cola, Warby Parker, One Laptop Per Child, One World Futbol Project, IKEA 4.) PARTNERSHIPS WITH TECH GIANTS WHO HAVE SOCIAL INITIATIVES IN PROGRESS NOW: Tech giants who have current, related social initiatives underway may wish to pair with Pop Up Bus for even greater impact. Examples: Google + Grameen Foundation's "Community Knowledge Worker's Program" and Facebook + Airtel's internet.org. 5.) SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE MISSION PRODUCT PARTNERSHIPS: Companies who build sustainable products as part of their product line. This demonstrates social responsibility as corporate mission. Examples: Fenix International's "ReadySet Solar Kit," Samasource's microwork programs, Stepping Stone's mobile learning (basic literacy and numeracy). 6) MICROWORK: Microwork is a way to teach basic 21st century tech skills within developing countries. Various partnerships could be leveraged. Please check out our microwork business model in the documents section of the post.

How is your idea specifically increasing access to employment opportunities and pathways for young people?

Pop Up Buses and Hubs bring 21st century skills training (skills in demand by modern employers) directly to youth within their communities. The bus workshops are customized to the needs of the community. The bus routes create a real-time, extensive network of employment information that is shared with youth. If youth don't have access to modern skills training via traditional educational routes, the Pop Up Bus network is an alternative.

What early, lightweight experiment can you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

Team member, Alex Mokori, is currently piloting the project with 23 youth in Uganda. Team member, Priyanka Botny, has offered to pilot the project in 8 villages in India in Nov 2014-Jan 2015. Time permitting (after September), I could pilot the project in DC by meeting with recent college grads and performing the same steps Alex is performing now. These steps generally are informally interviewing grads about their employment goals, how difficult it has been to achieve those goals, what skills they think they need to acquire to meet those goals, and what skills they think other local youth need to achieve employment goals. This would allow me to think through potential workshops that would assist local youth and would pinpoint types of mentors who would be beneficial to the youth.

How do you envision your idea being implemented?

  • Keen to be involved in prototyping but need partners at some stage
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Team (15)

Leigh's profile
Gavin's profile
Gavin Cosgrave

Role added on team:

"Gavin, Welcome to the #PopUpBus Team! Looking forward to hearing your suggestions + ideas. Workshop prototyping you design for your "Real-world challenges visit the classroom" idea may align well with types of workshops Pop Up Bus can teach to youth... Here's to putting the thinking caps on!"

Molly's profile
Molly Babbington

Role added on team:

"Molly, Looking forward to hearing more excellent contributions from you -- your in-the-field insights, experiences and ideas. Welcome to the Pop Up Bus Team! Leigh"

Khin's profile
Khin Tye

Role added on team:

"Welcome to the Pop Up Bus Team Khin! Super to have an official Youth Mentor on the team. Looking forward to X-collaboration between both of our ideas & seeing what paths/journeys this takes us on! All best, Leigh"

wekesa's profile
wekesa zab

Role added on team:

"Wekesa, Welcome to the Pop Up Bus Team! Excited to have you as part of the team -- as an insightful, global perspective. Looking forward to your ideas and feedback! All the best, Leigh"

Sarah's profile
Sarah Klein

Role added on team:

"Sarah, Welcome to the Pop Up Bus team! Looking forward to your continued brainstorming on this project. Cheers! Leigh"

Daniel's profile
Daniel Kolodziej

Role added on team:

"Daniel, Welcome to the Pop Up Bus team! Looking forward to X-collaboration across our ideas. All best, Leigh"

Rehmah's profile
Rehmah Kasule

Role added on team:

"Rehmah, Welcome onboard the Pop Up Bus Team! Your insights and ideas are welcomed. Looking forward to our cross-collaboration! All the best, Leigh"

priyanka's profile
priyanka botny

Role added on team:

"Priyanka, Welcome to the Pop Up Bus team! Looking forward to having you onboard & to your shared insights while traveling in India. All the best, Leigh"

Karolle's profile
Karolle Rabarison

Role added on team:

"Welcome to #TeamPopUpBus Karolle! Great to have you onboard (whenever time permits on your end). Thank you for your insights, which are leading the team down new pathways of research and investigation. All best! Leigh"

Paul Fr's profile
Paul Fr

Role added on team:

"Paul, A warm welcome to #TeamPopUpBus! We look forward to your continued suggestions and insights, and are thrilled to have a Romanian team member join our prototyping. All best, Leigh"

Dave's profile
Dave Zinsman

Role added on team:

"Welcome Dave to #TeamPopUpBus! Let the journey mapping begin ;) Happy to have you onboard, Leigh"

Bettina's profile
Bettina Fliegel

Role added on team:

"A first class collaborator who inspires many across the OpenIDEO community with her creative ideas and energy. Welcome to #TeamPopUpBus Bettina :)"

Sergio's profile
Sergio Marrero

Role added on team:

"Welcome to #TeamPopUpBus Sergio! Thanks for helping Alex and I brainstorm sustainable business models. All best, Leigh"

Andres's profile
Andres Lazo

Role added on team:

"Welcome to #TeamPopUpBus Andres! Why don't you read through the Pop Up Bus + Innovation Center project plan, and check out our Impact Stories. Then let us know your ideas/suggestions, and how you would like to implement the project within your community. Looking forward to the collaboration! All best! Leigh"

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Attachments (5)

PopUpJourneyMap_UgandaPilot.png

Journey Map specific to Pop Up Bus + Alex's Innovation Center Pilot: Based on data Alex is collecting live. Working draft.

UgandaPilotRoadmap_Sep1.pdf

Pilot Roadmap V1: Working draft. See all of Alex's supplementary documentation.

PopUpBusPrototype_v1rough.pdf

Pop Up Bus Prototype V1: Working, rough draft

PopUpBus_businessModel.pdf

Pop Up Bus Business Model: Contains a variety of approaches that generate sources of funding. Stat: Rough brainstorm/draft stage

PopUpBusBusinessModel_byDan.pdf

Pop Up Bus Business Model by Dan: With a focus on Microwork. Beautiful work Dan!

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Photo of Khin Tye
Team

Regarding the business model for running a pop-up bus in a large urban city, I've received a reply (at last) from someone who had done a similar programme in London, sponsored by a large corporate business. These buses that worked like youth clubs. It cost about £100,000 / per year to run. Its good to keep costs in mind when done in big cities otherwise the bus will be hard to sustain.

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