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770 contributions
573 ideas
573 final ideas
52 final ideas
52 final ideas
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Working together with an organization in Nepal, this project seeks to identify and train female leaders, who in turn provide information and guidance to other women in their community. 

[Summary by the Amplify Team]

Working together with an organization in Nepal, this project seeks to identify and train female leaders, who in turn provide information and guidance to other women in their community. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of DFA NYU

Maps improve safety and can be put up affordably at any low-income urban train station in a city.  

At most urban train and bus stations in the first world, a simple map shows commuters and the public how to find emergency services such as the nearest hospital or police station; as well as basic services (such as the nearest toilet) or where to find alternative transport home.  Maps do not exist at most train stations in South Africa.  Our project is a bid to encourage local municipalities or Improvement District offices to do what most cities around the world do, put up maps to promote safety, tourism and economic development.

Maps improve safety and can be put up affordably at any low-income urban train station in a city. At most urban train and bus stations in the first world, a simple map shows commuters and the public how to find emergency services such as the nearest hospital or police station; as well as basic services (such as the nearest toilet) or where to find alternative transport home. Maps do not exist at most train stations in South Africa. Our project is a bid to encourage local municipalities or Improvement District offices to do what most cities around the world do, put up maps to promote safety, tourism and economic development.

Photo of Janine Tilley
14 18

A 'business-in-a-box' that helps women in Kenya launch their own in-home childcare business – providing a safe space for children in the community and steady employment for young mothers. 

[Summary by the Amplify Team]

A 'business-in-a-box' that helps women in Kenya launch their own in-home childcare business – providing a safe space for children in the community and steady employment for young mothers. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of Afzal Habib
51 45

The idea is to promote safety in shebeens (local bars) in South Africa through a series of codes and house rules that communicate appropriate socialising behaviour and disallow unacceptable conduct. 
[Summary by the Amplify Team]

The idea is to promote safety in shebeens (local bars) in South Africa through a series of codes and house rules that communicate appropriate socialising behaviour and disallow unacceptable conduct. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of Andrew Charman
27 43

A mission to increase public awareness of women aged 15-30 on the unspoken, unseen and dismissed aspects of sexual health in Iran. 

Kandu is a bridge that connects young women to professionals providers and expertise, integrating service into what women and teens already do, be more accessible and better adopted into the women behaviors.

The service  helps connect the existing places such as hairdressers, clinics and healthcare professionals. 

Why hairdressers?!

1- The 70%  of Iranian women frequent in hair salons.
2- Completely isolated from men, where they have any idea about what’s going on inside this place. 
3- The women usually automatically start to talk about their private, intimate matters together.

A mission to increase public awareness of women aged 15-30 on the unspoken, unseen and dismissed aspects of sexual health in Iran. Kandu is a bridge that connects young women to professionals providers and expertise, integrating service into what women and teens already do, be more accessible and better adopted into the women behaviors. The service helps connect the existing places such as hairdressers, clinics and healthcare professionals. Why hairdressers?! 1- The 70% of Iranian women frequent in hair salons. 2- Completely isolated from men, where they have any idea about what’s going on inside this place. 3- The women usually automatically start to talk about their private, intimate matters together.

Photo of Bahar Shahriari
50 51

Accessing communal latrines and toilets is one of the major dangers for women in urban slums. This idea proposes illuminating the route to the communal bathrooms using photo-luminescent paint. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Accessing communal latrines and toilets is one of the major dangers for women in urban slums. This idea proposes illuminating the route to the communal bathrooms using photo-luminescent paint. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of Anya Ow
40 45

A project to provide school-aged girls in Bangladesh with safe, affordable transportation. This idea is to manufacture bicycles, sell them at a reduced price, and provide bicycle training for girls. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

A project to provide school-aged girls in Bangladesh with safe, affordable transportation. This idea is to manufacture bicycles, sell them at a reduced price, and provide bicycle training for girls. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of Mashuda Khatun
44 39

This idea is to start a "collaborative laboratory" in India, where organisations learn to start up their own “by women for women” taxi companies employing low-income women. 
[Summary by the Amplify Team]

This idea is to start a "collaborative laboratory" in India, where organisations learn to start up their own “by women for women” taxi companies employing low-income women. [Summary by the Amplify Team]

Photo of Gender at Work
51 108

Parul, a 20 year old living in a gutter, works 8 hours a day, shops on her way home and then helps her mother with household chores. During period, she avoids work and often complains about pain. Her mother taught her to use torn clothes and she has no private space or proper access to clean water to wash that cloth. She knows about sanitary napkins but thinks they are a luxury and feels shy talking about it with others. Project Mukti is for the likes of Parul that allows them to work freely and safely during the sensitive time of the month. Mukti, the bengali term for freedom empowers homemaking women to run their own sanitary napkin selling ventures, enlightens the community via workshops and put an end to the social stigma attached.

Parul, a 20 year old living in a gutter, works 8 hours a day, shops on her way home and then helps her mother with household chores. During period, she avoids work and often complains about pain. Her mother taught her to use torn clothes and she has no private space or proper access to clean water to wash that cloth. She knows about sanitary napkins but thinks they are a luxury and feels shy talking about it with others. Project Mukti is for the likes of Parul that allows them to work freely and safely during the sensitive time of the month. Mukti, the bengali term for freedom empowers homemaking women to run their own sanitary napkin selling ventures, enlightens the community via workshops and put an end to the social stigma attached.

Photo of Farzana Hossain
19 28

The Akilah Institute for Women proposes the development of an intensive leadership development program for young African women with the desire to launch a political career. The Political Leadership Incubator (PLI) will ensure that more women assume significant leadership roles within African governments and support legislation that promotes womens rights across the continent. Current Akilah students will be selected to enroll in this specialized track. After the program is established, it will be expanded to organizations in additional countries.

The Akilah Institute for Women proposes the development of an intensive leadership development program for young African women with the desire to launch a political career. The Political Leadership Incubator (PLI) will ensure that more women assume significant leadership roles within African governments and support legislation that promotes womens rights across the continent. Current Akilah students will be selected to enroll in this specialized track. After the program is established, it will be expanded to organizations in additional countries.

Photo of Elizabeth Dearborn Hughes
11 18