OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

Real-Women Innovation Hub (UPDATED+FILE-ADDED)-27-may-2014

Real Women Innovation Hub is that platform that will create a clear path for women and girls to go from poverty to self-sufficiency to community leadership. Unlike training programs that prepare people for jobs they may not find, we will prepare women and girls to create jobs for themselves and for others. We will invest deeply in our Fellows, and we will keep working with them to realize a return on that investment – one that will pay dividends for the whole community.

Photo of Dr. Mike Iyanro
50 30

Written by

Provide a short description of your idea

Our idea is the Real Women Innovation Hub, a project that will promote new approach to entrepreneurial education and women employability in developing countries. The RWIH grows and catalyzes a portfolio of business ventures to empower low-income urban women in order to build commercially viable business solutions, drive growth in the small, medium and micro enterprise sector (SMME) and generate socio economic development at scale. Secondly, RWIH brings a new kind of job that can be done over the internet (microwork) into low income urban communities to empower women and girls. This kind of job can be done by women from the comfort of their homes or by simply visiting a cyber café around their communities. Through this they earn income to support themselves and families.

Get a user's perspective on your idea.

We were able to interview few prospective users in the low income urban area of Abeokuta South LGA, Nigeria..... and the conversation goes thus:....INTRO BY RWIH TEAM: Hello please can we have few minutes with you? We are from the Real Women Worldwide, a global advocacy organization bringing together solutions to improve the health and wellbeing of girls and women in low income urban areas of the developing world. In partnership with an organization based in the USA called OPENIDEO we are presently working to bring a new project into your community that would create jobs and employment for women and girls. Specifically, we want to help women be their own boss by empowering them with the tools needed to launch their own businesses. Secondly, we want to bring a new kind of job that can be done over the internet into your community. This kind of job you can do from the comfort of your home or by simply visiting a cyber café around your community. Through this you can earn some cool cash to support yourself and family. We would like to get your view on the incoming project and the impact you think it would make in your community. Do you really think such project would suit your community? As a person would you like to participate? ........................HERE ARE THE RESPONSES:........SHOLA, 27 years old, Diploma holder, Housewife, unemployed : “Wow this is the first time I would hear such thing from anyone because so many organizations are particularly focused on the city center. I would love to be my own boss and also employ other people. I have a dream to start a pure water factory business due to the problem of drinking water we have here but it is difficult because I don’t have money and the revolving loan we get is not enough to do such project. My husband is a carpenter so we have small money to manage with our 6 children. My eldest daughter is 21 years old and presently in a polytechnic we are using all we have to support her so that she can graduate and help us to take care of her younger ones too. I will like to be the first to participate in your program. I think my daughter will be happy to do your internet work too. I tried to get employment but it is difficult. For some companies out there you can spend several months working and not have an employment contract. They can fire you at any time. So your heart is not at it when you're working. This was my experience with my last employer. I would welcome any opportunity that will give me the chance to be my own boss and also support my family.” .............. ......Aisha, 35 years old, Trader. “For me I want to expand my business. I presently sale women shoes and cloths as you can see. If your program can help me expand then I will surely participate and I think women in my meeting will surely like it too. I also think this your internet work you explain will help our young girls who go after older men to sleep with them to make money. Just recently a lady close to my house was used for rituals and she’s a graduate. Her body was found in the bush with her breast and private gone. This is due to poverty and lack of employment. I think experience working will be good for the young who have skills but can’t find employment. With your project I think they can find another job.” ......... Bukola, 23 years old, Student. “This is opportunities that have been looking for. I attended an ICT conference few months ago and I had about this internet job opportunity. I checked out but can’t find a reliable source. I will be happy to participate in your program. I believe this can also help me improve my computer proficiency and I will be able to acquire many useful skills that I can use in my future career.”............ These and many more people we have interviewed and we can see from the interiew that there is a huge interest from our target audience to participate in the project. With access to knowledge, credit and collaborative networks and technologies, women and girls have opportunities to innovate in production chains, adding value to local goods and making their family more competitive in regional markets.

Show us what implementation might look like.

Real Women Innovation Hub Team will run a pilot program within 12 months period in the community of Abeokuta, South LGA Nigeria. This pilot will allow us to test the Enterprise accelerator and microwork outsourcing services to determine how to run the entire project sustainably so that it can be expanded to other communities in Nigeria, and beyond. To do this, we will need at least $45-50,000 within 12 months. With this, we will be able to create a pilot program to incubate 20 women owned enterprises and also train at least 50 women and girls in ICT skills to handle microwork and market themselves across our partner platforms such as (oDesk, Task, microworkers, microflower, samasource, Rabbit or Elance). This will include $15,000 for office space, organization registration with the authorities, office equipment's, furniture, 30 low-cost desktop computers at ($63 dollars each), program materials, awareness events, registration and training; Investment of $25,000 on 20 women owned enterprises and this will be in addition to angel investors investment in each businesses within 12 month pilot, and $5000 for the provision of affordable technology for our microworkers using Ubislate tablets, which cost less than 100 USD to purchase. Please see attached timeline for more details.

The Solution
Our solution is the Real Women Innovation Hub......

Vision
Women and Girls empowered to be agents of economic development in slums.
 
Mission
To partner with at-risk women and girls (unemployed or underemployed) in underdeveloped and impoverished urban areas to launch community businesses capable of creating ten or more decent, sustainable jobs for their peers.
 
Services 
The “RWIH” will bring two basic services into the low income urban community:  
Service 1. Enterprise incubator/Accelerator: within the first six months of the project life, RWIH team will establish a vocational training platform and a Start-Up business accelerator for young women that will draw upon a rich pipeline of entrepreneurial ideas emerging from low income women communities and among young women in higher institutions in Nigeria, and will leverage access to a network of contacts, space and broadband into fast-paced prototyping and business development. RWIH will mobilize internal and external networks to seed and fund businesses emerging from the platform. Ultimately, the RWIH model will get women entrepreneurs from ideas to funding literally in 3-6 months!  
Overall, the RWIH will support women entrepreneur in building adapted business models for the Base of the Pyramid, access a screened pipeline of franchisees and manage the network for them, allowing feedback and best practices to be identified and implemented.   
The RWIH will work closely with franchisees as well: provide them with a portfolio of proven franchise business models, and through strong partnership with our sister organization Passion Incubator (http://www.passionincubator.ng/)  we will train and mentor them for 2 years, create a strong support ecosystem around them by sourcing strategic partners and adding services that they often do not have access to at the micro level: access to premises, finance, technology (mobile bookkeeping, mobile banking, etc.) or others. An integral part of our project will be the creation, for example, and use of simple electronic tools to support the entrepreneur & franchisor, such as mobile accounting & stock management software.   
  
Service 2. RWIH Micro Work Outsourcing: Billions of people, particularly women, lack access to dignified work. In a world flattened by technology, this needn’t be the case. Due to rising literacy levels (at 84% globally) and the spread of low-cost computing, Internet access and mobile devices across the developing world, these people can be tapped as a powerful labor force. Digital services represent a new type of work that allows semi-skilled but un- or underemployed workers to earn money by comprising a vital part of virtual assembly lines. You don’t need roads, or telephone lines, or brick and mortar to build this generation’s factories. All you need is a brain and a cheap laptop connected to the Internet. The primary input of this new digital work is human intelligence, which we now have in abundance. This will create a rapid transformation in the types of people that can do digital work. The digital assembly lines of today allow people with basic training to plug their skills into much larger work streams that engage hundreds of people on many continents. Within the first 12 months of the project life, RWIH in partnership with technology organizations will use a unique combination of sales team, local training, and web-based tools to extend these jobs to marginalized women, and girls. This service will bring technology skills training and paying digital work to poor women in Nigeria and around West Africa. We will achieve this by connecting women living off less than $2 a day to microwork: small, digital tasks taken from a larger project that can be performed using the Internet. Leveraging on the power of the rural internet and mobile broadband connectivity, the hub will provide a 10 weeks ICT skills training in the online and offline domain in order for our target audience to be able to handle microwork outsourced from Technology Company from across the world. Our 10 week training: will prepare participants to market themselves on online marketplaces such as oDesk, Task, microworkers, microflower, samasource, Rabbit or Elance. This will enable women to gain skills, earn a living wage and break the cycle of poverty for themselves and their families. Though access to internet is seen as a major barrier in the low income communities and women are mostly affected. To reduce this problem, we will setup digital work centers across our demography starting within the RWIH facilities which will be equipped with solar panels on the roof and will feature low‐cost computers and Internet access, and a free work platform. We will use cutting-edge education technology, hands-on coaching, work-based learning and strong partnerships to ensure that our students are successful. Those students that successfully complete the program will be awarded netbooks to ensure they have the tools and access to thrive in the digital work marketplace. 

Why we focus on providing these two services:
1. Firstly, some of our target population are presently in school such as the young women who presently attend the university and can’t possibly run a venture due to their school program. But still they need a source of income to support them in school.
2. Secondly, everyone cannot be admitted at once into the incubator/accelerator space. We can only admit a minimum number of people and viable business idea at a point in time.
 So we thought what will the rest of the people do? How can we keep them engaged by doing something important with their time? That brought about the microwork outsourcing service to provide acceptable “Microjob” to women who are otherwise earning less than 2 dollars a day with jobs destroying their dignity (like getting a dollar a day to protest for a politician… slave like conditions). By giving work and so income, we wish to give opportunity and dignity to poor people.
Nevertheless, we will be taking one step at a time during the implementation first. The Enterprize Acelerator will run from the first year of  the project life, while the outsourcing service will be introduced in the secondly year in order for us to plan and avoid mistakes in our implementation processes.
    
Why our idea is different:  
Job creation being a core objective in Nigeria, there are a lot of entrepreneurship programs and support available in the country. At the same time, franchise consulting and associations exist but not at the micro level yet and we feel that the micro level comes with its own specific challenges and requirements. With the RWIH we are the only ones to not only focus on developing and growing micro franchise solutions, but also to complement our entrepreneurial program range for women, and finally mentor our entrepreneurs and franchisees for 2 years.  
Real-Women Innovation Hub wants to create a clear path for women and girls to go from poverty to self-sufficiency to community leadership. Unlike training programs that prepare women for jobs they may not find, we prepare women to create jobs for themselves and for others. Unlike traditional microfinance programs that focus on providing loans for anything from working capital to school fees and wedding expenses, we will focus our loans on building strong, growth-oriented businesses that are coached and vetted by experienced local business leaders and our team of social venture capitalists looking for maximum social and financial returns.  
We will invest deeply in each class of Fellows, and we will keep working with them to realize a return on that investment – one that pays dividends for the whole community.  
We want to redesign tools for entrepreneurs in order to make them accessible to women with small businesses in Nigeria and West Africa. Our findings has shown that the tools that is currently available is hard to comprehend and not very practical for these women. We will make crowdsourcing, support groups and mentors reachable and a resource to promote the co-creation of new solutions.  
Our projected impact in three years is to have impacted 1000 women entrepreneurs, and adding at least 50 great companies to our portfolio of businesses in the course of doing business, generating 1,000 high paying jobs in the process and creating direct wealth and ownership for up to 150 people. 

How the Service will Develop Over Time:
  Phase 1 (first year) – Phase 1 is seen as a pilot program and will be divided into 1st and 2nd six months. The first six month will be targeted at putting all resource needed for our pilots together and in the same period we will concentrate on testing our model and assumptions of developing  women owned enterprises with atleast 10-15 women with viable entreprenurial ideas within the low income urban center. The lesson learned during this period will be documented and will be used to forge our path ahead of the secondly six month. 
 During the secondly six months, we will build on the lesson learned in the first quater and we will also feature another 10-15 women with viable business idea for another six month. In addition to this, we will also test our microwork outsourcing model during this second period with atleast 30-50 women and girls to see how this two services can work simutaneously  and we will run this program in the  low income urban Communities of Abeokuta South Local Government area of Ogun state Nigeria as our pilot point.
 
However, the main objective will be to develop an effective, pro-active accelerator/incubation service which meets the need of women and girls. Crucial in this will be the continued development of the Real Women Innovation Hub Network, the strengthening of the resources within the Hub and Spokes and the development of the use of ICT.
 A major aim within the first year will be to ensure that the Hub moves to the next stage in the incubation/acceleration ladder and establishes a Business Incubation/accelerator facility with a focus on women owned social enterprise. The Network will look to access a number of funding strands in support of education and learning, particularly based on new technologies, and the development of enterprise, including social enterprise. Activity to include:
- Use of Business Incubation Fund money to access Convergence Funding to increase incubation activity and resources
- Investigation into the potential for Communities Training Budgets and the Communities Trust Fund to support incubation activities
- Increasing links with the local providers of education and training such as EduTrust, the University of Abeokuta, local schools and Passion Incubator Training in support of the development of entrepreneurial training programmes for women and girls
- Application to the Ogun Regeneration Trust to establish a Social Enterprise Business Incubation Service for women and girls
- Application to Communities@Abk to link the use of ICT to the development of social enterprise for women and girls
- Building of links with Creative Communities project
- Building of links with Local Service Board in support of incubation activities
- Investigation of international programme to identify areas of support for women and girls in Nigeria
- Identification of, and support for the development of, building assets to provide space for new business activities for women and girls
- Investigation of income generation opportunities in support of sustainability
- Investigate extension to the membership of the Network, to include developing social enterprises and private sector business and to investigate the potential for a membership fee to support facilities
 
Phase 2 (year 2) - Phase 2 will build on the experience of Phase 1 by extending the incubation service to all remaining interested partnerships. It is anticipated that some RWIH Partnerships will have ambitions to establish business incubation facilities and they will be supported in this development.
-Introduction of the microwork outsourcing service into the community fully for women and girls.
Phase 3 (years 3 - 5) – A move from pilot to mainstream activity with a focus on establishing a sustainable business incubation service across Nigeria, and other West Africa countries offering all four stages of business incubation which meets the needs of all network members.
-development of the microwork outsourcing service to full scale, partnering with international organizations such as IBM, Google, Facebook, Microflower, Samasource etc.
 The above outlines the development of the service within RWIH but it is crucial that links are forged with other local authorities undertaking similar developments. 

SWOT ANALYSIS
Strength
-Strong Real Women Innovation Network
-Commitment and passion – the team has a 13 + year old track record supporting learning and pathways into work; CF Partnerships 3 year track record
-Social Enterprise Incubator is in both Ogun Incubation strategy and Abeokuta Economic Regeneration Strategy
-Strong ‘buy in’ to develop the project
-Partnership with Ogun Enterprise Agency
-Partnership with Innovation Centre, Lagos - a strong source of best practice, mentoring, training and access to University and International networks
-Ability to deliver accredited training
- IT expertise
-Hot desking space – in both Hub & spokes
-Member of Business Incubation Association
-Member of the Lagos Incubation Practioners Group
-Member of Social Enterprise Development Partnership Fund Advisory Group
 
Weakness
-Limited experience providing business support services
-Current weak asset base

Opportunity
-Key RWIH Partnerships have identified social enterprise development as key strands of their action plans and many have firm projects needing immediate intensive support
-Opportunities to up skill existing RWIH staff (in partnership with Innovation Centre, Lagos & Ogun Enterprise Agency through best practice knowledge transfer, mentoring and training
-RWIH recognizes that Social Enterprise business model with growth potential have a role to play in disadvantaged communities - and in future growth sectors of the economy (esp. construction/maintenance)
-Opportunities to purchase existing premises in Abeokuta
 
  Threat
-Potential lack of cooperation from business support agencies – especially those tasked with supporting social enterprise
-Fragmented funding environment
-Current short term uncertainty over the roll out of Convergence funding
 
RISKS
RWIH greatest barrier to success is government interference and inadequate space/funding. We believe the first will be overcome by our team by ensuring we keep government agencies abreast of the social benefits of the sector, and creating an environment of trust with policy makers. The later issue is an execution concern, since we believe we provide a market for both entrepreneurs and investors that seek them; and creating the platform will be profitable in the long term as global investors are increasingly interested in Africa based start-ups. Our space (infrastructure) barrier can however be overcome by the help of our friends and well wishers; organizations like OPENIDEO that want to partner with us for change!
 
Delays- Any project looking to develop a mixed funding base will experience challenges faced by different funders working to different timetables and able to make decisions at different speeds. These delays can cause drift and are one of the biggest sources of frustration.
 The approach that will be adopted here is target early funders to come on board. Early supporters have been identified to fund early/launch phase and use this commitment to give confidence to other funders to back later phase
 

Explain your idea in one sentence.

Real-Women Innovation Hub is a platform that will allow low-income women to have access to practical and comprehensive tools that will guide them through the process of starting or growing an Enterprise.

What is the need you are trying to solve?

In August 2010, the International Labor Organization warned of a "lost generation" of young women left out of the global economy and facing reduced life opportunities. They include over 80 million unemployed women, and over 250 million women in the ranks of the "working poor" – eking out uncertain and unsustainable livelihoods in the informal market, on the margins of society. Real-Women Innovation Hub is committed to helping the "Lost Generation" find its way. "Street women and girls" are homeless, unemployed, and underemployed women eking out livelihoods in the shadows of "slum cities" around the world. They are the products of three game-changing global phenomena: 1. Population Explosion: According to the World Bank, we are in the midst of the largest women cohort in human history. The population explosion is concentrated in the developing world, prompting governments to speak alternately of a "demographic dividend" and a “ticking time bomb." 2. Urbanization: Today, half the world’s population lives in cities. Every week 1.3 M more people flood into urban centers. This is the largest migration in the history of humanity, and it’s rapidly accelerating. Most migrants end up in slums. Slum-dwellers already make up 1/6 of humanity. By 2050, two billion more will join their ranks, most of them women. 3. Women Unemployment: Even before the Great Recession, the ILO estimated that developing countries needed to create 1 billion jobs over the next decade just to keep up with first-time job seekers. Women now make up 30% of unemployed people on the planet. The stakes are high: halving women unemployment in sub-Saharan Africa could increase GDP by 12-19%. The “lost generation” is an economic, social justice, and international security issue. Street women and girls cost their countries billions in lost potential, are vulnerable to exploitation, and tend to be targets for recruitment by criminal groups, from local gangs to terrorist cells.

Who will benefit from this idea and how would you monitor its success?

Beneficiaries – Will include: 1. Direct beneficiaries – women and girls in Nigeria, West Africa and other developing countries with a focus on those disadvantaged and economically inactive in low income urban communities. 2. Indirect beneficiaries - Those receiving new and enhanced services provided by emerging new and growing enterprises in sectors as diverse as creative industries: micro/macro enterprise, leisure, tourism and heritage: environment: health and social care. 3. Location – The incubator/accelerator service will be piloted in Abeokuta South Local Government area of Ogun State, Nigeria. This learning will be used to explore opportunities to replicate the service in other regions across other developing countries. However, the Real Women Innovation Hub is a new and innovative approach to supporting business development within low income urban communities in Nigeria. This project plan is focused on the activities which will be undertaken over the first 18 months while the service is developed. Every attempt will be made to ensure that the expertise existing within the network is maximized to deliver an effective service. External links will be forged with relevant organizations with the aim of replicating good practice. Additionally a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework will be developed to ensure that every opportunity is taken capture both success and failure and to reflect on both with a view to improving the service. The Framework will be developed by the network in the early stages of the project but will include as a minimum the following; Pre-Implementation Stage - Clear project objectives - Confirmation of outcomes / results / impacts (SMART) - Identification of Performance Indicators - Clear Timetable for implementation - Detail costs of planned inputs - Analysis of existing response to the challenge of business development - Analysis of business development activities in comparable areas Implementation Stage - Monitor Progress -Monitor inputs -Monitor outputs -Monitor key milestones -Investigate any other core tracking data that does not relate to the above but may be useful -Allow the monitoring to influence implementation Post-Implementation – Evaluation - Compare outcome data with the baseline - Calculate the cost effectiveness of the project - Calculate the costs of the project, including any inputs monitored during the project - Compare the cost of the project with the cost of previous responses to the problem and estimate any savings - Examine comparable areas - Examine trends in the wider area and any similar comparison area to asses’ impact At this stage it is expected that all monitoring and evaluation will be undertaken through the use of expertise existing within the Incubation Network.

Who would be best equipped to implement this idea in the real world? You? Your organisation? Another organisation or entity?

The Real-Women team represents people from all walks of life. A significant number of our team members once were in low socioeconomic neighborhoods or have otherwise experienced what it is like to be an underprivileged individual. These team members are crucial to our effort to adapt our services to best benefit our target demographic, as they can tell us what the statistics is; they can describe to us firsthand the problems disadvantaged girls have and the solutions they wish they had and that we can now give. Perhaps the one thing all the Real-Women team members have in common is leadership skill. Most of our current Real-Woman team was selected because we had significant leadership experience. We are versatile– anyone on the project team has the ability to work alone, a project follower, or a project leader. Most importantly, we take initiative.

Where should this idea be implemented?

This idea will be directed towards developing countries. There is mounting global evidence about interventions that improve women condition, but one important gap that has yet to be filled is a deeper understanding of “implementation research,” with specific consideration of how to deliver these interventions quickly, affordably, and in a way that makes women more likely to seek more empowering opportunities. RWIH team’s commitment to continuous improvement will equip us well for implementation research, and we will be partnering with top academic institutions such as the Covenant University to measure our impact in a scientifically rigorous way. We think that impact begins with knowing our clients. With this in mind, we will use outreach strategies in low-income communities across Abeokuta South Local Government area to learn about the empowerment-seeking behavior of our clients. Interviews, focus groups, and follow-up surveys will tell us which service clients’ value, how much they’re willing to be part of our network. With this information, we can cater the service we provide to meet their needs in the long run. We believe that our greatest opportunity for social change comes from ruthlessly measuring our outcomes and operations, documenting how we reached them and disseminating findings so that private and public providers can replicate what we learn. Collecting metrics such as liveihood outcomes, and utilization, will not only help us improve, but also will allow us to share best practices with the broader OpenIdeo community. Tracking our experimentation with new technology such as mobile phones and an online client database will improve our ability to collect client information, document impact and outcomes, and get real-time feedback on our services.

How might you prototype this idea and test some of the assumptions behind it?

Phase 1 (first year) – Phase 1 is seen as a pilot program and will be divided into 1st and 2nd six months. The first six month will be targeted at putting all resource needed for our pilots together and in the same period we will concentrate on testing our model and assumptions of developing women owned enterprises with at least 10-15 women with viable entrepreneurial ideas within the low income urban center. The lesson learned during this period will be documented and will be used to forge our path ahead of the secondly six months. During the secondly six months, we will build on the lesson learned in the first quarter and we will also feature another 10-15 women with viable business idea for another six month. In addition to this, we will also test our microwork outsourcing model during this second period with at least 30-50 women and girls to see how this two services can work simultaneously and we will run this program in the low income urban Communities of Abeokuta South Local Government area of Ogun state Nigeria as our pilot point. Phase 2 (year 2) - Phase 2 will build on the experience of Phase 1 by extending the incubation service to all remaining interested partnerships. It is anticipated that some RWIH Partnerships will have ambitions to establish business incubation facilities and they will be supported in this development. -Introduction of the microwork outsourcing service into the community fully for women and girls. Phase 3 (years 3 - 5) – A move from pilot to mainstream activity with a focus on establishing a sustainable business incubation service across Nigeria, and other West Africa countries offering all four stages of business incubation which meets the needs of all network members. -development of the microwork outsourcing service to full scale, partnering with international organizations such as IBM, Google, Facebook, Microflower, Samasource etc. The above outlines the development of the service within RWIH but it is crucial that links are forged with other local authorities undertaking similar developments. With this in mind, we will reach women through local NGO's and other organizations in different countries in West Africa. Our first pilot in Nigeria via the Youth Innovation Hub Project proved that the interest of women is huge, over 200 women signed up for our first pilot within few days. We will make affordable technology available to those who need it by using tablets. We will also work with governments in Nigeria and other West African countries to make this idea viable in the long term.

What might a day in the life of a community member interacting with your idea look like?

The incubation/accelerator service is a pro-active provision that will consist of a cocktail of support activities, including training and education and business support, offered by network members which will link the development of social enterprise to regeneration programmes. With access to knowledge, funding and collaborative networks and technologies, women entrepreneurs will have opportunities to innovate in their local community, adding value to local goods and making family business more competitive in regional markets. They will be able to implement small industries in their communities, using wisely and efficiently the natural resources, managing environmental challenges and processing raw materials and primary products that are already made by their families (for instance, to process cassava, providing high quality flour to markets). They can also organize marketing arrangements to sell their products with more competitive and fair prices, without middlemen. Women and girls will be empowered to take part in local governance, participating in the decision-making process in their communities, associations and in regional forums, where strategic agendas and public policies are built. Those outcomes will impact women, raising their incomes. And will create conditions so women and girls will build future perspectives, staying in their communities and contributing to their development.

Evaluation results

6 evaluations so far

1. Does this idea have the potential to impact the lives of low-income women and girls living in urban areas?

Yes, the idea clearly targets low-income women and girls living in urban areas. - 83.3%

The idea targets women and girls but isn’t necessarily focused on those living in low-income urban areas. - 16.7%

The idea targets people living in low-income urban areas but doesn’t seem to benefit women and girls specifically. - 0%

2. Does this idea describe a set of next steps and a timeline to accomplish them?

The idea clearly outlines next steps, the resources and team needed to execute them and a timeline to accomplish this. - 83.3%

The idea gives a broad explanation of what it hopes to accomplish but there is no clear timeline or activities to reach its desired goal. - 16.7%

The idea has not clearly articulated what the next steps are. - 0%

3. How feasible would it be to implement a pilot of this idea in the next 12-18 months?

Very feasible – the next steps described in the contribution seem achievable in this time period. - 83.3%

A pilot appears feasible but more work needs to be done to figure out how it would be executed. - 16.7%

The idea is not ready to be piloted yet – the concept needs several more months of user feedback and prototyping to be ready for a pilot. - 0%

4. Does this idea bring a new and fresh approach to the city or region in which it’s set?

Yes, this idea appears to be new and innovative! I’m not aware of other ideas in this city or region that address this need using a similar approach. - 66.7%

There are other initiatives doing similar work in this area – but this idea targets a new group or has an updated approach. - 33.3%

I can think of many initiatives addressing the same need using a similar approach in the same region. - 0%

5. How scalable is this idea across regions and cultures?

This is an idea that could help women and girls in many different cities. I can see it being implemented across multiple regions and cultures. - 100%

Maybe but I’d imagine it would need very significant changes. - 0%

The idea is really only suited for one specific region / population. - 0%

6. Overall, how do you feel about this concept?

I love this idea! - 83.3%

I liked it but preferred others. - 16.7%

It didn't get me so excited. - 0%

50 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of porn vx
Team

hi i visit your site realy great and cool and Your posts are awesome Thank you
http://indiansexvideo.org/

View all comments