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Let's raise boys and men to end violence and discrimination against women and girls. (Updated on May 26)

This idea aims to provide young men an opportunity to study and practise gender equitable behaviour. It provides them with knowledge, skills, peer support and leadership so that they can end violence and discrimination against women in their lives and communities. The focus is on prevention rather than post intervention. Also, most importantly the idea aims to move beyond attitude change and focus on behaviour change, so that these young men are equipped to take personal and collective action. The objective here is to create leadership in the form of young men who would work with different community members so that men are raised differently by the community as a whole. The pilot is being implemented & we are looking to scale it.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
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Provide a short description of your idea

Our idea is a behaviour change programme model that engages adolescent men. It tackles the problem of violence and discrimination against women and girls. It aims at creating systemic change in a community, where the participants of the programme end their violent and discriminatory behaviour; and the community as a whole supports and raises men to be gender equitable.

Get a user's perspective on your idea.

(Experience map uploaded in the form of 7 steps alongwith the photographs)

Show us what implementation might look like.

(Implementation timeline uploaded alongwith the photographs)

The Action for Equality programme primarily focuses on men in the age group of 14-17 years from low-income communities. It trains mentors to engage successive generations of men; and through partnership places them into low-income communities. Mentors deliver a unique and attractive programme where adolescent men uncover the pivotal role of women in their lives.

The programme is designed to provide men with knowledge, skills, peer support and leadership.

Action for Equality Programme (AFE) is divided into three parts – Graduate Programme and Alumni Programme and Leadership Programme.
AFE Graduate programme
The AFE Graduate programme forms the foundation and lasts for 15 weeks.  The curriculum that has been designed specifically for this programme covers topics such as: Equity, equality, patriarchy, what is discrimination, violence on self and on women, sexual and reproductive health, human rights and so on. Men who participate in the training are also coached through a process of personal behaviour change towards women using bespoke tools that help them manage their behaviour over time and how to apply them in real life situations. At the end of each cycle, men take collective action to support women in their community.
AFE Alumni Programme
In order to reinforce and sustain the positive behaviour change in men demonstrated by them at the end of AFE Graduate Programme, continued opportunities must be provided for them to practise the new found pattern of behaviour. The Alumni Programme builds on this insight and provides volunteering opportunities for graduates on a weekly basis to develop, prepare and deliver interactive and multimedia community activities on issues that focus on violence and discrimination against women. This not only reinforces the behaviour change in the graduates but also increases their capacity to plan and implement the activities. This also benefits the women in the community who receive awareness information and practical advice on tackling daily life discriminations and violence. This is an ongoing activity and is conducted year-round.
AFE Leadership Programme
The AFE Leadership Programme builds on the Alumni Programme. Most active volunteers are nominated to be leaders. They receive training on how they can gradually take complete ownership of the programme and the core objective in their communities. As a pilot in one community, these leaders have formed a committee of community members and are facilitating a dialogue to identify problems and relevant solutions to address the issue of violence and discrimination against women. Safety of women and girls is a primary topic of discussions. The objective here is for the leaders to take complete ownership so that an organisation like ECF is no longer needed in these communities.

Outcomes:
Till date:
  • Over 2791 men have enrolled on Action for Equality Programme
  • 1216 men have graduated from Action for Equality Programme from 20 communities across Pune
  • Over 440 men continue to take action every week to support women in their communities
  • Over 2000 men and women have benefited from the programme. 
  • Figures till date demonstrate that 61% of women who live with the graduates of the Action for Equality programme report a reduction in experience of violence or discrimination.

Future plans:

Over the next 5 years we want to:

  • Sustain: Continue to implement and further improve Action for Equality Programme and conduct robust monitoring and evaluation.

  • Expand: We have identified ‘partnerships’ as a key element to expansion. We are currently conceptualising a programme to provide incubation support to organisations that wish to start working with boys and men through their existing work. By end of 2014, we aim to start the pilot. We will provide basic structure to the partner organisations (based on Action for Equality), provide seed-funding for the selected few and coach them in adopting the principles of AfE to the context of their work. So, the communities we reach out to will be where the partner organisations are already working. Our preference would be to begin low-income urban communities. We will be open to working with organisations across India. In this manner, we aim to work with 100 organisations over the next 5 years.

Explain your idea in one sentence.

Create constructive safe spaces for men in the age-group of 14-17 to provide them an opportunity to study and practise gender equitable, so that they can take personal and collective action to end violence and discrimination against women.

We are already implementing this idea across 20 low-income communities in Pune, India for more than 3 years. We are now looking to scale this model and inspire other organisations to adopt the approach of raising boys and men.

What is the need you are trying to solve?

There are 230 million men under 18 in India. As they witness other men's violence against women being systematically unchallenged, they can become abusive too. (Extrapolated UN data suggests that 116 million of these men will have perpetrated violence against a partner and 79 million will have perpetrated sexual violence against anyone.)

Women's empowerment, the traditional approach to addressing this issue, unfairly places the burden of change on women. This approach does not tackle discrimination at its root and is alone not delivering the anticipated or required results in reducing inequality and violence. Women shoulder the burden of the empowerment process; whereas men, whose attitudes and behaviour sit at the root of the problem are absent from the solution.

We believe that unless we embrace the approach of engaging boys and men; irrespective of the resources that are mobilised to support women directly, women will continue to face violence and discrimination.

Who will benefit from this idea and how would you monitor its success?

A) Action for Equality (is and) will impact:
1. Boys in the age group of 14-17
2. The women and girls in the communities where they live.
3. The peers of the boys and the other men in the communities

The programme is currently being monitored through four elements:
1. Participation data and inputs of the programme
2. Behaviour assessment of the participants at the beginning and at the end of AFE Graduate Programme
3. Outcome assessment interviews with the women associated with the graduates of the programme.
4. Research to understand the factors that influence men's behaviours in these communities.

B) The programme at scale:
1. 100 community-based organisations working on women's empowerment
2. Communities and the men and women they work with.

Who would be best equipped to implement this idea in the real world? You? Your organisation? Another organisation or entity?

ECF has been successfully implementing the Action for Equality programme in the 20 communities in Pune, India. We are partnering with 4 community based women's empowerment organisations in this implementation.
 
 
  We are currently looking for resources, experts and partners to:
- conduct third party evaluation of AfE
- provide financial support to sustain existing program across 20 communities
- provide strategic advice in the areas of: Incubation support and Knowledge Transfer
- provide non-financial and financial support for overall communications activities required for expansion
- provide financial support for funding the different phases of the expansion program: concept and program development, scouting and selection, coaching and seed-funding for the partners.

Where should this idea be implemented?

It is currently being implemented across 20 low-income communities in Pune, India.

With minor adaptation, this idea/programme can be implemented in low-income urban communities across India.

How might you prototype this idea and test some of the assumptions behind it?

Evidence and details regarding Action for Equality are given above.

What might a day in the life of a community member interacting with your idea look like?

An experience map has been uploaded to give a better idea.






















Within a community on a long term basis, we expect that:
- Women and girls will experience a reduction in the violence and discrimination they face at the hands of men within their families and the wider community.
- Young boys will be raised to respect women and their rights.
- Male advocates will stand up for the rights of women in the community.
- Male advocates will take active role in facilitating dialogue where they identify problems and solutions to end violence and discrimination against women in their communities.

Evaluation results

49 evaluations so far

1. Does this idea have the potential to impact the lives of low-income women and girls living in urban areas?

Yes, the idea clearly targets low-income women and girls living in urban areas. - 89.8%

The idea targets women and girls but isn’t necessarily focused on those living in low-income urban areas. - 10.2%

The idea targets people living in low-income urban areas but doesn’t seem to benefit women and girls specifically. - 0%

2. Does this idea describe a set of next steps and a timeline to accomplish them?

The idea clearly outlines next steps, the resources and team needed to execute them and a timeline to accomplish this. - 89.6%

The idea gives a broad explanation of what it hopes to accomplish but there is no clear timeline or activities to reach its desired goal. - 10.4%

The idea has not clearly articulated what the next steps are. - 0%

3. How feasible would it be to implement a pilot of this idea in the next 12-18 months?

Very feasible – the next steps described in the contribution seem achievable in this time period. - 87.5%

A pilot appears feasible but more work needs to be done to figure out how it would be executed. - 12.5%

The idea is not ready to be piloted yet – the concept needs several more months of user feedback and prototyping to be ready for a pilot. - 0%

4. Does this idea bring a new and fresh approach to the city or region in which it’s set?

Yes, this idea appears to be new and innovative! I’m not aware of other ideas in this city or region that address this need using a similar approach. - 81.6%

There are other initiatives doing similar work in this area – but this idea targets a new group or has an updated approach. - 16.3%

I can think of many initiatives addressing the same need using a similar approach in the same region. - 2%

5. How scalable is this idea across regions and cultures?

This is an idea that could help women and girls in many different cities. I can see it being implemented across multiple regions and cultures. - 89.8%

Maybe but I’d imagine it would need very significant changes. - 8.2%

The idea is really only suited for one specific region / population. - 2%

6. Overall, how do you feel about this concept?

I love this idea! - 93.9%

I liked it but preferred others. - 2%

It didn't get me so excited. - 4.1%

76 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of David Neisinger
Team

Fantastic, full support for this!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thanks David. We are excited about the potential this idea has if more and more organisations adopt the approach.

Photo of Karolle Rabarison
Team

Hey Rujuta — Had a couple of quick question about the plans to scale AFE across India. What's the best way to reach you?

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Karolle,

You can contact me via email. My email id is: rujuta(dot)teredesai@ecf.org.in

I look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks,
Rujuta

Photo of Guy Viner
Team

Hi Rujuta- thanks so much for sharing this innovative idea. An all-male group is scaling a similar concept at the University of Pennsylvania. Perhaps some of their work may be relevant to your research and prototyping! Glad to facilitate an introduction, should you be interested. Looking forward to seeing how others contribute to and refine your concept.

https://www.facebook.com/upennoneinfour

Photo of Will Muir
Team

@guy, please do connect us. Rujuta.teredesai@ecf.org.in and will.muir@ecf.org.in
thank you!

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Guy,
this is a really interesting initiative. You might want to check the blog created by a high school boy in NY http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/
to discuss gender equality. It is the prototype of his idea for this challenge (which was selected for refinement): https://openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/ideas/their-problem-is-ours-too
Feel free to share with the group the blog.

Will,
Melchior had been in touch with Rujuta and I know he would love to have an opportunity to collaborate with your team.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Anne,

We started the conversation with Melchior. We will been soon contributing stories to his idea. We really liked his idea.

Rujuta

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Thanks Rujuta! I know Melchior was waiting for your colleague Prashanti to get in touch. Looking forward to reading your comments and stories! Your program is great and it'd be wonderful to have some of the boys involved in your program engage in the conversation Melchior is trying to start.

Photo of Guy Viner
Team

Hi @Will and @Rujuta- please look out for an email connecting you to my colleague Dylan. Hopefully he'll have some helpful insights!

Photo of My Hanh Tran
Team

Great idea, this is thinking outside of the box!
A shift of mind where "adolescent men uncover the pivotal role of women in their lives."

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thank you!

Photo of Melchior Tamisier-Fayard
Team

Hi Rujuta,

Congratulations for making it to the refinement phase!
This is a great idea and what you are trying to achieve is very important. I have posted about similar initiatives: http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/2014/05/changing-views-jagriti-youth.html

As part of this challenge, I posted an idea http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/ideas/their-problem-is-ours-too
In a sentence, my idea is to get children and teenagers, girls and boys, around the world to participate in a conversation about gender issues, and how to solve them. I believe that sharing experiences across different countries will allow us to see both similarities and differences, and hopefully come up with ways of reducing gender split and violence around the world.

I would love to have some of the kids involved in the AFE program to join the conversation I am trying to create and share their views and experiences on the blog. If you are interested, I can create an account/authorship (With your email) so that you can post directly on the blog. If it is easier for you, you can also send me the content you want me to post on your behalf. Hopefully, you are interested in collaborating with me during refinement.

Based on your experience working with boys and men on this issue, it'd be amazing to have your feedback on my idea. I'd like to know if you think it would be of interest for the boys you are working with to share their experience as well as hear about others' experiences. I am also curious to know what are the issues you can foresee in terms of access to computers and the internet. It was an issue that several people mentioned in their comments to my idea. I therefore developed some offline conversation starters http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/p/how-to-run-offline-conversation.html
Can you imagine using them or a variation of them in your workshops?
Any other suggestions on how to help participation to the blog.
Thanks in advance for your feedback.

You should also check Bea's idea as it is very complementary to yours: http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/refinement/engaging-men-in-the-fight-against-gender-based-violence-in-urban-slums
as it also aims to engage boys and men in creating a change.

Thanks,
Melchior

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Melchior,

Thank you so much for sharing your idea with us. We will be more than happy to collaborate.

We recognise that it is really important to share stories - because these stories will inspire others.

It is definitely something some of our team members and participants of the programme can contribute towards. I think best would be if we send you the contributions to begin with. Can you please share your email ID with us?

Also, we do have something similar to your offline conversation format that we are using in curriculum and monitoring and evaluation. It is currently being revised. However, I can share the draft with you.

Thanks ,
Rujuta

Photo of Melchior Tamisier-Fayard
Team

Dear Rujuta,
Thank you for your positive response! I'm looking forward to collaborate with you and your team. I'm more than happy to post on your behalf.
My email is mtamisier-fayard@brooklynprospect.com
Please send me any content you would like me to put up.

It is exciting to know you are using a similar offline conversation format. I would love to see your draft. Maybe once you had a final version, it could be something we could share with others. (If it is okay with you.)

Last, if you have any description from you offline conversation to share, it would be amazing!
Thanks and looking forward to your reply!
Melchior

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Melchior, My colleague Prashanti will be in touch with you.

Photo of Melchior Tamisier-Fayard
Team

Hi Rujuta,

I'm looking forward to be contacted by your colleague Prashanti.

I thought that it might be useful to see the kind of participation I had in mind. Here are 2 examples from my collaboration with Pushpa from the Bakhtapur Youth Club in Nepal:

http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/2014/05/interview-with-pushpa-joshi-from.html

http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/2014/05/educating-youths-regarding-their-sexual.html

Thanks!

Photo of Melchior Tamisier-Fayard
Team

Rujuta,
if you give me an email, I can send you an invitation to the blog. I can also send you 4-5 questions (as I did with Pushpa) to interview you for your post on the blog.
 In my current update, I was thinking of trying to develop strong relationships with 2 organizations which would choose and mentor 2 young people to be ambassadors on the blog. Check my updates: http://www.openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/ideas/their-problem-is-ours-too
What do you think of this idea? Could you imagine having 2 boys involved in your program being ambassadors on the blog?
Looking forward to hearing from you.

Photo of Melchior Tamisier-Fayard
Team

Rujuta,

please ask your colleague Prashanti to contact me so that I can create an account so that he can post some of the views from the boys you are working with. Here is my email again mtamisier-fayard@brooklynprospect.com

There's been a very lively conversation with a post from the Bhaktapur club in Nepal: http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/2014/05/offline-conversation-from-bhaktapur.html
 I'd love to see something similar with AFE.

If you know one or 2 alumni or boys currently involved in your program who would be interested to be ambassadors for AFE on the platform, that would be great.

Thank you!

Photo of Madhumita Das
Team

It is important to challenge the norms early both among boys and girls. Transformation among boys at an early age through challenging negative masculinity norms is the need of the hour. We at ICRW believes and works for this. Our full support to ECF for such an important initiative.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Madhumita, you are so right on the importance to challenge norms from an early age. It's great to know that your work at ICRW also aims to these changes in behaviors. It is only a drop but you might want to check this blog this blog http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/ created by Melchior, a high school boy in NY based on his participation to this challenge: https://openideo.com/challenge/womens-safety/ideas/their-problem-is-ours-too

Check for example this post: http://theirproblemisours.blogspot.com/2014/05/changing-views-jagriti-youth.html

Feel free to comment on Melchior's blog and share your views.

Thanks!

Photo of Orla Kelly
Team

Best of luck with the next phase Rujuta. It is a great initiative and you deserve to progress.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thank you Orla!

Photo of Will Muir
Team

@orla, how about that! Great to have your support. Thank you so much! How are you and what are you up to?

Photo of Karolle Rabarison
Team

Congrats on making it this far, ECF!

Photo of Gurudas Pilankar
Team

Congratualtions!! Now that you are commencing evaluation phase, my best wishes are with you and your team to make this idea come to reality. Definitely it is and will be helping to develop gender sensitivity amongst young men and bring end to gender violence and dicrimination against women. Good Luck!!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thank you Gurudas for your continued support.

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Here's a friendly tip: update your OpenIDEO profile so folks can see who they're collaborating with here. Think skills, experience, passions & more!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Done! Thanks.

Photo of Will Muir
Team

@meena thanks for the tip!

Photo of John-Paul Hamilton
Team

I love what you're doing and wish you the very best of luck

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thanks John!

Photo of Will Muir
Team

@John, thank you so much mate!

Photo of Rushil Prakash
Team

Extremely impressed by your approach of addressing men. Good luck!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thanks Rushil

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thanks Rushil

Photo of Will Muir
Team

@rushil, thanks for your comments. Where do you work?

Photo of leonorawwynne
Team

Amazing work.

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Rujuta,

I really like this idea and have a few questions to add to the mix! For example, how are you attracting the young men into the program? (schools? word of mouth?) Who is conducting the trainings? (people from ECF? alumni of the program).

I think it's great that you've outlined ways that our community can support your work. It leads me to my last question - how are you currently supporting your activities? (e.g. donations? volunteers?)

Good luck!!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Chioma, appreciate your interest in this idea...

There are things we do to attact the men into the program:
1. We spend some time in the community to interact with key stakeholders including: parents of adolescent men, youth groups, local community based organisations, etc and inform them about the work.
2. Old graduates and current volunteers are most influential in attracting new participants in the programme.
3. The events conducted through AFE Alumni Program also become a platform for attracting men into the program.
4. The format of the events and the curriculum is designed in way that allows maximum interaction, fun activities such as role plays, disruptive theatre, debate, games and so on. Also, we don't ask the participants to join sign up for all 15 weeks + alumni program in one go - but what our mentors do is ask them to join for the "next few sessions" and then follow up with them.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Chioma,

Regarding your other two questions....

1. As of now, the training is conducted by ECF mentors. We see a participant moving from being an Observer to-----> Advocate of change------>Volunteer------>Leader------ > to a Mentor. There is group of volunteer leaders, who can become mentors. We are in the process of understanding how best to utilise their skills and interest.

2. We are currently supporting our work through donations from individuals as well as grants from foundations and trusts.
3. We have a strong team of 18 people working on this idea. In addition, at any given time we do have 2 volunteers who are assigned specific tasks. They can be based in Pune or any other part of the world.


Thanks again.

Rujuta

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Rujuta,

Thank you for your comprehensive answers! I love the idea of encouraging the boys to come to the 'next few sessions' rather than enrol in what could be a daunting 15 weeks. I also think that the fact that the training is already leading to graduates that want to volunteer as mentors is a great sign and testimony to the careful thought your group has put into this project.

The user experience journey was really helpful to look at. What kinds of resources do you think you will need to expand this activity beyond the 20 communities?

Chioma

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Chioma,

In the expansion phase, we will need support through resources, experts and partners to:

- provide financial support to sustain existing program across 20 communities (this is our top priority and foundation of all our work)
- provide strategic advice in the areas of: Incubation support and Knowledge Transfer
- provide non-financial and financial support for overall communications activities required for expansion
- provide financial support for funding the different phases of the expansion program: concept and program development, scouting and selection, coaching and seed-funding for the partners.

I have tried to incorporate this response in the entry.
Rujuta

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Thanks Rujuta! Great idea to consolidate your answers to some of the key questions our community has been asking you - reading through them right now!

Photo of Lisa di Liberto
Team

Congratulations Rujuta for making it to the refinement stage! Excellent work! I agree with you 100% that in order to end violence against women and girls, men and boys must be engaged. I have some questions to throw in the mix after reading about your impressive efforts. Once the boys become mentors, are they placed within targeted areas within their communities to focus on? For example, would there be a program designed for them to reach out to younger boys before they reach 14 years of age? Since public toilets are a violent environment for women and girls to be in, is there a program designed for multiple mentors to implement in these physical locations?

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Lisa,

In principle that is the objective- the graduates of the programme to mentor the younger boys in the communities. We don't have a formal structure for it in place as yet. However, there are numerous anecdotes where we see this is already happening.

Also, as a part of the AfE leadership programme the main goal is that the young boys are raised to be gender equitable through the support of the volunteers, leaders and the wider community.

I didn't quite understand your question - 'ince public toilets are a violent environment for women and girls to be in, is there a program designed for multiple mentors to implement in these physical locations?'' can you please explain?

Thanks,
Rujuta

Photo of Lisa di Liberto
Team

Hi Rujuta,
My apologies for not wording that question more clearly. Will some of the mentors specifically focus on teaching other boys how to make the public toilets a safer environment for women and girls to enter?

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Lisa, Got you! Through the AfE Alumni Programme and AfE Leadership Programme volunteers and leaders do address such issues. We haven't talked about toilets specifically but have talked about making general public spaces safer for women.

Our aim will be to reduce our (including mentors) involvement and gradually equip these leaders to take ownership along with their community members to take this up. I will admit that we have just started this process and trying to understand the role of leaders and community members; and the format and level of engagement.

Photo of Ezra Mbogori
Team

Rujuta - really good project idea - I was just made aware of it and I can see in it aspects of the things we would like to undertake in our efforts to make sanitary facilities more accessible to slum dwellers. It gives us good ideas for how to promote voluntary action and at the same time reorient the minds of younger men (boys included) around how to interact with girls and women. Good to see the idea has been tested and we will certainly want to borrow from some of your experiences.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thank you Ezra. We will be more than happy to share our experiences. Also, as mentioned in our description we are looking to scale our work by building capacity of organisations to engage boys and men. We will be launching the pilot phase of this 'knowledge transfer' later this year. As we are building this phase, we have realised that the approach of working with boys and men and the principles can be applied to various fields: Health and sanitation, anti-sex trafficking, education, preventing child marriage and so on.

Do have a look at some of the reports we will be releasing over the next few months, in which we also share more information on initiatives that engage boys and men across India.

Also, if you have specific questions please feel free to get in touch with us.

Rujuta

Photo of Vanessa Dubyn
Team

Dear Rujuta. Your project and ours (Women for Afghan Women) have important similarities, especially the central concept. We would be interested in talking to you about sharing ideas, information, etc. As you will see from our proposal, we are interested in starting a men's movement in Afghanistan. The time seems right. Perhaps you have ideas about this. Anyway, let's email each other.
   I have briefly taken over from Vanessa Dubyn because our gala is on Thursday (the 29th) and she is swamped. You can email me at efhyneman@aol.com. congratulations for an excellent plan. Very intelligent and cogent. Esther

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

We're very excited at the notion of folks collaborating on this challenge continuing to collaborate offline! If this eventually leads to increased impact for your respective initiatives – please do let us know.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Esther,

Thank you for getting in touch. We would love to speak to you. As you mentioned, there are a lot of similarities in our work (even in the model).

I have just dropped you an email. I look forward to hearing from you.

Rujuta

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

@Meena,

....we will definitely let you know.

Rujuta

Photo of Karan Gopalani
Team

Some lovely work there Rujuta and Team. Well done for making it to the refinement stage. Would absolutely love to see such a campaign in India where the youth are seemingly becoming more interested in social and political issues. Kudos!

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Karan, Thank you for your comments. We are already implementing this programme. Now, we are looking at taking it to the next level.

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congratulations on making it to the Women's Safety Challenge Refinement list, Rujuta! Thank you for submitting your idea to this challenge. We were really impressed by your approach and your focus on working with men and boys in particular. We’d like you to answer a few questions so we can consider how we might take this idea forward with you. How will you build on or change your existing programme – where will you expand first? Which communities could you reach out to and how? You’ve explained your curriculum very clearly and your approach is very impressive – can you tell us more about how you deliver the curriculum? What kind of tools do you use to make the training memorable and to reach as many young men as possible? Is the training classroom based or does it incorporate activities, like sport? How might you consult with young men to co-design your curriculum? Could you interview a target trainee? What about the views of girls – is there a way you could incorporate these? For more tips for this Refinement phase, check out http://ideo.pn/ws-refine-tips and catch our Tools for Refinement at http://openideo.com/content/tools-for-the-womens-safety-challenge-refinement-phase.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi, Thank you for your comments and questions. I have tried to incorporate the response in the entry as well.

1. How will you build on or change your existing programme – where will you expand first? Which communities could you reach out to and how?
We have identified ‘partnerships’ as a key element to expansion. We are currently conceptualising a programme to provide incubation support to organisations that wish to start working with boys and men through their existing work. By end of 2014, we aim to start the pilot. The knowledge that we share at this stage will be entirely based on Action for Equality Programme. We will provide basic structure to the partner organisations, provide seed-funding for the selected few and coach them in adapting the principles of AfE to the context of their work. So, the communities we reach out to will be where the partner organisations are already working. Our preference would be to begin low-income urban communities. We will be open to working with organisations across India.

2. Is the training classroom based or does it incorporate activities, like sport?
The training is classroom based and is conducted in the community centres. However, it includes a series of activities and games so that the participants have fun and don’t feel like they are back in school!

3. How might you consult with young men to co-design your curriculum? Could you interview a target trainee?
We conduct focus group discussions and interviews with the participants of the program. Their feedback is taken into consideration while designing modules. However, I would say that this is one of the weaknesses of the programme. The team is currently trying to figure out ways we can involve the participants of the programme in curriculum design especially for Alumni Programme and Leadership Program in a more structured manner. We will be testing these solutions July 2014 onwards.

4. What about the views of girls – is there a way you could incorporate these?
Girls and women’s inputs are collected through focussed group discussions (FGDs) and outcome assessment surveys, discussion during stakeholder engagement. Right now, the discussion during stakeholder engagement is not being captured effectively. Each mentor makes their own notes but that information is not utilised effectively. Information from FGDs and outcome assessment is captured and utilised effectively.

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Awesome User Experience Map uploads! These really helped me understand your idea through a human centred lens.

Photo of Sandiip Saravanan
Team

Great initiative and best wishes to the team. Has there been an attempt to partner with corporates to scale up the initiative and multiply its reach? I would imagine brands targeting teens (from Gillette, Head&Shoulders to your Coke, Adidas, etc) could find this a great rural marketing initiative + differentiating CSR.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Sandiip,

Thanks for your support. We have partnered with corporates but on a very small level. It is definitely worth exploring and if you have any specific suggestions/contacts, please do share.

At the same time we have to be careful as some of the brands you mentioned have released ads that are completely against the principles of our work - they promote false concept of masculinity, promote 'protectionist' attitude amongst men and further enforce gender sterotypes.

However, there are many others we can contact ...so definitely worth exploring.

Photo of Kavita Gonsalves
Team

Hi Rujuta, I was wondering if you had a look at 'Bystander Intervention' programme and whether it can be relevant to your goals.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Thanks Kavita!

Photo of Kavita Gonsalves
Team

Here it is: http://wiki.preventconnect.org/Bystander+Intervention
http://www.nsvrc.org/projects/engaging-bystanders-sexual-violence-prevention

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Some of the elements are embedded in the programme. I will share the links with the team. The resources and ideas shared can be really useful for community events that the participants organise.

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Team

Congrats on making it to refinement!

I really love this idea because it places the onus for changing a problematic behavior on the actor responsible for exhibiting that behavior in the first place. In the long run, I can see that success could be measured by a decrease in the volume of crimes against women/or a change in women's perceptions about how safe it is in their neighborhoods. In the short-term, however, it seems like it may be really challenging to measure the effect of AFE's interventions.

Beyond measuring numbers of participants in the program, I'm curious what kinds of "actions to support women" are you measuring among participants? How much time is there between when you do the first benchmark of men's behavior and the later assessment of their behavior?

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Lauren, Thank you for your interest and your support.

Measuring behaviour change is a challenge, especially because it is gradual; the time taken and level of change differs from person to person.

You are right, after a few years we should measure -women's perceptions about how safe it is in their neighbourhood.

We think the process indicators are equally important as the outcome indicators. So, things that we are currently measuring are:
1. Attendance, participation and retention levels (when we say participation we are talking about active participation including things such as how many are taking action in their personal lives as well as in the communities)
2. Outcome assessment interviews are conducted with women who are associated with the graduates of the programme. This exercise is conducted a month after graduation cycle.
3. Using a tool designed by us, our mentors conduct behaviour assessment at the beginning of 15 weeks and at the end. We want to extend this to the AFE Alumni Programme as well.

Also, an important factor to consider here is we work with the participants for 3-5 hours a week. Rest of the time they get influenced by various factors in the communities. It is important to understand these influences so that we can adapt the content to address the issues in a relevant manner. This year, we started a mentor research project, where three research assignments are conducted to understand the enabling environment.

Something our team is excited about: We are in the process of developing a system using the Salesforce platform where we can track progress in a participant from multiple variables right from enrolment till the time he continues or even after he discontinues. Once tested this tool will be made open source for others to adapt and use.

Photo of Lauren Williams
Team

Thanks for the response, Rujuta!

It's cool to hear you're using Salesforce - I've seen it work really well for nonprofit organizations in the States using it to manage administrative data and track long-term client outcomes. I look forward to hearing how everything turns out!

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Interesting stuff, Rujuta! We'd love it if you might consider helping people better grasp how this idea could play out by describing some example scenarios which illustrate user journeys through some of the proposed activities you've outlined. Check this example: http://www.openideo.com/open/e-waste/concepting/neighbourhood-e-waste-champion/ where a few simple scenarios were created in an attempt to explain the goodness on the idea. (You can update your post at any time by hitting the Update Entry button up there on the right.) Through doing this we'll be able appreciate your idea through the lens of people in low-income communities.

We also hope you'll join in on discussion on others people's ideas here at OpenIDEO. Your perspectives would certainly enrich our conversations and collaboration...

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Meena, We will definitely updatethe content using soome of your tips.

Photo of Manash Samaddar
Team

Hi Rujuta,

Great initiative!! One of the possible ways of bringing about this change might be to launch an extensive and aggressive campaign which mocks and ridicules men who live in localities where women feel unsafe, forcing them to intervene just to protect their "pride". Too extreme...your thoughts ?

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

@Manash Samaddar: My personal opinion is mocking and ridiculing wouldn't really help....and doesn't seem like a constructive solution. However, I do agree that we need to make violence and discrimination against women socially unacceptable.

Photo of Teng Zhang
Team

I definitely agree with you. The best way to solve this problem is "Let's raise boys and men to end violence and discrimination against women and girls". Schools and parents are actually teaching boys into that way. There are a lot of expert are studying this issue, and they have a lot of ways to help solve this problem. However, why we still have this problem? I think we are still in the process of solving this problem.

Photo of Ruta Barve
Team

Rujuta, Great work. Really appreciate the root cause analysis your team has done and the actions planned to resolve the root cause. Your team has shown sustained improvement. Keep up the good work. Would like to be part of this initiative in or other way.

Photo of Kavita Gonsalves
Team

Rujuta,
Your proposal reminds me of the work of Harish Sadani in Mumbai.
http://www.mavaindia.org/

I would be happy to connect you both to collaborate.

Photo of Rujuta Teredesai
Team

Hi Kavita,
We are aware of MAVA's work. We have collaborated with them in the past for certain events and knowledge and will continue to do so.

Thanks for your support on this approach.