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Let Vapp suggest

Mobile devices and apps enable different processes of voting using their multiple ways of input and output. But how can a poll clerk decide which method fits who?

Photo of Cansu Akarsu
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Vapp

Using mobile devices, especially smart phones and tablets/pads, has been discussed a lot during the ideation phase. The main benefit that can be gained using these devices is to combine their different ways of input and output and suggesting different methods of voting for people with particular needs.

For instance, when a visually impaired voter needs to use his hearing sense to be guided, and is able to use his/her hands to touch control the app, another might be able to see the device but not use his/her hands. The possibilities of various disabilities voters have, require a flexible system.

When we think of all the sensors and the number of possibilities to combine different ways of input and output, it gives an opportunity to address each individual case. To make use of this technology, we need a clear and simple app interface: Vapp.

Vapp is originally designed to be operated by the poll clerks in order to easily suggest the method of voting for particular cases. (such as Mikkel who just broke his both arms)

Throughout the concepting phase, the feedbacks and personas showed a demand for allowing conscious voters and/or their assistants use Vapp to set their voting method manually. (such as Tasha who has been blind since birth)

In the end of both cases, voters use Vapp by themselves, to go through the voting process suggested for their needs.

Vapp is used by different audiences:

A. Poll clerks– to fill in voter profile at the voting poll

B. Voters and/or assistants - to set voting preferences before elections

C. Voters– to vote self sufficiently

There are variations in the user interface for each audience, including the phases they go through. For each of them, the app requires a ‘National ID number login’ or a ‘National ID card snapshot’ to start.

A. Helping a poll clerk at the voting poll

A poll clerk cannot always guess which method of voting, what kind of input and output, is convenient for which voter. In order to predict this, Vapp lets the poll clerk fill in a voter profile according to the voter’s sensory, physical and cognitive disabilities.

The combination of sensory and physical disabilities a voter might have can be very unpredicted. Luckily, the obstacles in different parts of the body are visible to the poll clerk. To enable logging in this kind of information, a body interface is used to click and select the impaired organs and senses.

There are alsoinvisible disabilities, like fatigue, reading and other cognitive disabilities which can be kind of observed, and further understood by going through a checklist of asking a couple of ‘yes/no’ questions to the voter or to his assistant. To find these out, Vapp guides the poll clerk step by step, enabling him to select ‘yes/no’ options as the voter answers.

After creating the voter profile with this interface, Vapp suggests the most convenient voting method, a combination of input and output, addressing the voter’s needs.

To be used in express scenarios, a quick menu can be created for commonly used voter profiles, such as ‘wheelchair user’, ‘visually impaired’, ‘age above 60’, etc.

A manual voting methodcan also enable the poll clerk log in a specific input and output type for voters who show a clear need of a certain device. (for instance if Angela demands on using a keyboard)

B. Addressing a conscious voter and/or assistant

Conscious voters and/or their assistants who have been dealing with their obstacles for years know exactly what they need. Allowing the app to run on a website beforehand addresses these people to login profile information to the system and save time at the voting polls. Even if a voter is not able to login his/her information alone, a caretaker or a family member can assist the person in need. The system will save the preferred voting method, which will allow a voter vote alone when the election time comes.

When using Vapp, the voter and/or the assistant can select among ways of input and output listed in the website. They can combine the two according to their needs, watch a preview video of how the voter will be guided to vote, and confirm to save.

When the voter comes to the voting poll, the poll clerk can just scan his National ID to access the voting method that is already created. The voter also knows how he will be guided through the voting process; a big amount of time and energy is saved.

C. Letting everyone vote individually

After creating a the voter profile, either with the help of the poll clerks or the assistants beforehand, the most convenient voting process is set for each particular case. Every voter has the right to vote self sufficiently, regardless of needing to share own candidate information.

How will this concept improve election accessibility for everyone?

All a voter needs is a national ID

Every citizen already has a National ID Card. The poll clerk can check a voter’s national ID card and mark the person as ‘VOTED’ on the digital system when letting him use Vapp. Using a smart device enables new fast ID verification methods:

Creating a hardware device to scan and verify National ID Cards has two negative requirements: 1. Every citizen’s National ID Card has to be electronic, 2. These devices have to be manufactured. By developing a scanning software, any National ID Card can be verified with a snapshot. Instead of using to the option of typing a voters National ID name/number manually, a poll clerk might prefer take a photo of the card. The technology is already used by several apps on smart phones for reading business cards and saving contact information. By integrating an effective and fast ID verification, Vapp becomes useful for non-disabled citizens as well.

Use mobile devices, have mobile poll clerks!

Using light-weight mobile devices and flexible voting processes enable poll clerks to be mobile as well. Voters who are not able to move out of the house, such as people in hospitals, people who have physical disabilities or people who need to stay home with their sick kid can benefit from a service where the poll clerks visit these places carrying a tablet/ipad. In that case, the biggest challenge is to maintain the privacy at all times. A portable voting booth is design in progress to be embedded into the system ensuring privacy in mobile scenarios.

(collaboration opportunity with ‘Voting Vans’ concept: http://bit.ly/xT83hO)

How well does this concept adapt to the changing needs of different voter communities?

The concept is based on a personalized voting process, suggested automatically or set manually according to the needs of different voters. The challenge is to make this process not confusing or time consuming. Vapp solves this problem with an easy interface.

Please check the above video or the attached pdf showing seven scenarios where different voters are guided through different voting processes. These are mostly suggested by Vapp according to the voter profile filled in by the poll clerk. Some characters are taken from the personas created by OpenIDEO: http://bit.ly/vote_personas

How about voters who are not disabled?

As mentioned above, Vapp can include a fast and effective National ID verification. In that case, whether disabled or not, any voter would first approach to a poll clerk with his ID. After the poll clerk uses Vapp to verify the person, then he would either continue filling in voter profile or editing different voting settings for special needs, or he would immediately set ‘standard voting’ and let the non disabled voter vote. The new standard digitalized voting and counting system would improve the elections for everyone.

(Check the ‘When the solutions for disabled becomes the new standard’ inspiration: http://bit.ly/z8FbEd)

What kinds of resources – whether time, money, people, partnerships, technology or otherwise – will be needed to get this concept off the ground?

The following teams go through a design process to develop Vapp

Creative team: interaction designers, anthropologists, software developers

Experts team: organizers of elections, doctors & nurses

Users team: poll clerks, representatives of voter personas, assistants of voters

Analogous team: people working in places requiring public interaction: banks, call centers

Following the design process, the implementation starts in a pilot areato test Vapp and to make any changes before executing in the coming elections. After the success, the poll clerks are trained by using Vapp. Partnerships with institutions using mobile devices can be made in order to borrow their resources. Think of all the laptops, tablets and pads that can be touched and played with at digital device stores and technology fairs. If these resources are used for elections, then it is a great social responsibility project and a sales technique for these brands. If a mother sees that her autistic son can vote with an iPad, then she would be motivated to buy it to communicate with him.


(( I just stumbled upon a news from New York Times that Oregon was the first state to allow disabled people vote with iPads! 

'One woman, who has impaired vision, was able to enlarge the print on her ballot so that she could see the names of candidates. A man with arthritis who could not hold a pen was able to touch the screen with his finger and mark his ballot.'

'The goal was to make voting accessible and convenient for voters with disabilities, and the iPad does exactly that,” said Kate Brown, Oregon’s secretary of state. ))

The concept apparently suggests a high tech solution to enable personal assistance on voting. However, the app can be developed in a more primitive version to run on any computer or ATM with a keyboard, a mouse, a microphone and speakers. For instance, instead of 'tapping the screen 3 times,' the voter can be asked to 'click 3 times with the mouse.' In that case, the mobility of the process is restricted, but the cost is lowered down. Local banks, schools and other governmental offices can let their computers be used during the elections.

(Collaboration opportunity with ‘Votin via ATM Network ’: http://bit.ly/FOVPPz)

The capital is mostly spent on the initial phase of research and development of the app. The biggest benefit of developing a Voting App is that it can always be updated with new features (such as a new language, updates on candidates, etc) in a very cost efficient way.

Opportunities for further improvement

Vapp can grow to be used by voters throughout the elections. It can involve information on the candidates, polling places, asking for a personal assistant beforehand, etc. Keeping the same interface, Vapp can be used in any internet browser or smart phone. In case a voter is looking for the polling place, Vapp can direct him to the nearest location using GPS technology.

(Collaboration opportunity with ‘Accessibility Map’: http://bit.ly/zd0MS6)

(Collaboration opportunity with ‘Disperse the Queue ’: http://bit.ly/y5fpTw)

Challenges of Vapp:

Requiring people to feel comfortable with electronic devices

Assuming that all the communities of the country is developed in technology

Requiring a big investment in research in the initial phases of development

Benefits of Vapp:

Helping people different roles and duties: poll clerks, voters, and/or their assistants

Creating a convenient voting process differing for each person with particular needs

Supporting the right to vote self sufficiently, not needing to share own candidate information

Making full use of existing and growing technology in our lives

Being a long term IT investment, allowing to be updated with new features in a cost effective way

Concept Presentation Video: http://vimeo.com/38933647
Scenarios Video: http://vimeo.com/38933647

Prezi Presentation Link: http://prezi.com/qvrfabopndfa/vapp/

My Virtual Team

Vincent Cheng · Ashley Jablow · Paul Reader · Jiangxuan Wu · Jakob Uhlin · Meena Kadri · Nymphaea Notschaele · Sarah Norell · Florian Villaumé · Whitney Quesenbery · Christian Johnson Thank you for all the feedbacks throughout the concepting phase. During the refinement, it is important to record the stakeholder feedback, which might as well be yours! So if you can comment on the following questions with a sentence or two, and include your role in voting (voter/assistant/poll clerk) and your profession/background below, I can use it to create a stakeholder feedback map. What opportunities would investing in this concept bring, for whom? What might be some challenges and ways to solve them? Please share the questions with any voter, poll clerk, investor, candidate, whoever you think can give feedback.

Evaluation results

13 evaluations so far

1. How well does this concept address the needs of voters who might be excluded from elections today because of a disability, difficulty with languages or reading, limited mobility or other conditions?

Really well: this concept clearly addresses the needs of voters with different abilities or limitations. - 61.5%

Pretty well: this concept addresses some of the needs of voters with different abilities or limitations. - 30.8%

Not well: this concept doesn't at all address the needs of voters with different abilities or limitations. - 7.7%

2. Thinking about the resources needed to implement this concept, how feasible is this concept for your community? (Hint: resources might be money, time, partnerships, or other inputs needed for implementation)

This concept is definitely feasible for my community to implement; the resources needed wouldn't be an issue. - 15.4%

This concept might be feasible for my community to implement, as long as we could find assistance with some of our resource constraints. - 61.5%

This concept is not feasible for my community to implement; it's just too resource-intensive. - 23.1%

3. How much of an impact would this concept make on you or your community?

This concept would clearly have a positive impact on me or my community. - 61.5%

This concept might have a positive impact on me or my community, but it's not clear exactly how. - 38.5%

This concept would not have a positive impact on me or my community. - 0%

4. Overall, how do you feel about this concept?

It rocked my world. - 53.8%

I liked it but preferred others. - 38.5%

It didn't get me overly excited. - 7.7%

64 comments

Join the conversation:

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Photo of Edmund Ng

This is something that will definitely help those who are visually impaired or physically challenged in any way. By choosing the most appropriate way to vote, it will definitely make voting less of a hassle.

I think one of the things I hate most is the long queues and I hope this would be able to help address that. I think with clear planning and everybody knowing what to expect, e.g. how many physically challenged voters, resources could be well planned and thus reduce the waiting time.


Edmund Ng
http://www.ceoconnectz.com

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

It has been so much fun and educating to participate in the challenge. Love my virtual team and this platform!

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Vapp is updated with a video explaining the concept. Sorry for my horrible voice and accent:)

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Photo of mamta gautam

Hey Cansu, some how i likeeeee your accent ; P

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

haha :) thanks!

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Hi Cansu - love the concept and organizing the voting process. One item that could be added would be around privacy. There are some disabilities that would require voice prompts and others that would require people to speak (i.e. cannot see screen). Might need to consider ways to facilitate the privacy issues in the design of booths or some other such way of providing a barrier to the voice/acknowledgement of actions.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Thanks Erika, you are so right. For now, I am not focusing on that due to lack of time, but for sure a portable booth needs to be designed within the concept.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Guess what? I just stumbled upon a news from NewYork Times that Oregon teamed up with Apple to be the first state to allow disabled people vote with iPads!

'One woman, who has impaired vision, was able to enlarge the print on her ballot so that she could see the names of candidates. A man with arthritis who could not hold a pen was able to touch the screen with his finger and mark his ballot.'

http://nyti.ms/uHwNbW

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hi everyone, thank you for all the feedbacks throughout the concepting phase. During the refinement, it is important to record the stakeholder feedback, which might as well be yours! So if you can comment to the following questions with a sentence or two, and include your role in voting + your profession/background below, I can use it to create a stakeholder feedback map. Please also share it with any voter with or without needs/caretakers and relatives/poll clerks/candidates you know!

What opportunities would investing in this concept bring, for whom? What might be some challenges and ways to solve them?

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

A lot updates have been made, a lot to read. You read and and give me feedback to help me create a stakeholder feedback map.

And do not worry, a video presentation is under construction!

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Sorry for the misspelling, should have been: you can read and give me feedback on the material:)

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

This is a great idea but why not have the voter fill out his/her own profile rather than leave it to the poll clerk? To ensure that the voter preferences are clear, accurate and explicitly stated and understood, I suggest incorporating some of the thinking from the January workshop. I am especially thinking of the Remote or Express voter profile mechanisms that came from that work. http://elections.itif.org/projects/design-workshops/concept-express-voting/

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hello Sharron, wow the concept and the Remote or Express voter profile fit perfectly! I guess you are right that they have the right to chose, but we can only see it if we do some role playing.

As far as I understood, the Remote case is when the voter fills in the profile beforehand. This means that all the voters, especially the ones with obstacles, already have access to using internet with/without help. This phase is feasible because there is no need for privacy, and they can be assisted by their family or care takers.

In the express voting scenario, choosing among one of the already set up ballots (Large print, Braille, Audio, HTML link, Different language, or Personal Assistant) would definitely make things fast. The problem is when we have look at the personas, we see that people have various obstacles; take a look at Minjun. If we are rethinking voting, and if we digitalize the process, then we have so many possible combinations that will address to there different needs of some special cases. In that poll of combinations of input and output, we need a very easy to use interface not to scare voters and show it like a complicated process. For the express voting there can be a 'quick menu' with commonly used voting processes, such as 'only braille.' It could be the voter or the poll clerk filling in the voter profile, I guess this also depends on the needs and it can be decided later on.

Please check our conversation with Whitney Quesenbery below where we discuss about similar issues.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I agree that there is room for both:

Some voters will know just what they need, and can indicate this on their own.

But poll workers will still benefit from an easy, consistent way to make suggestions to support voters at the polling place.

Even better if both were consistent. Two views of the same data, all based on good accessibility practice, and what's available in each jurisdiction.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hi Whitney and Sharron, can I ask you to check my latest reply to OpenIDEO? I would really appreciate your feedback to do some updates.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

You might also want to think about how the app could help with "invisible" disabilities - fatigue, hearing, reading and other cognitive disabilities - that are both not easily apparent, and not easy to identify by pointing to a body part.

Could the app also suggest ways to tactfully ask questions, suggesting appropriate and effective ways to communicate?

Or have icons for things like a chair indicating someone who can't stand in a line for a long time?

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Hi Cansu, I specially like your concept for the adaptability and coverage features. One additional feature could be to record each voter’s profile once they use the app. The next time a voter attends an election, the app is able to recognize the voter’s settings from previous elections and suggest the same voting method or similar methods. The voter’s profile could also allow the app to identify which of the voter’s conditions are temporary or permanent. For example, Mikkel’s broken arms will be tagged as temporary and he may not need voice voting for the next election.
In order to remedy privacy issues, the data of a voter’s profile can be disabled for sharing purposes. However, one advantage of sharing this voter’s profile could be that other civic agencies could also improve their services.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hi Eduardo, great input with the saving idea. It can immediately pop up in the coming election 'Do you want to load previous election setting?'

I do not think that voter's profile is a very valuable information for research and development purposes, and is not very secret when all the insurance companies know it all:) However, I will not go into that at this point.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I agree that this concept could be used with access to a persistent profile, but it's not where you need to focus.

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Photo of Dan Tang

Very well executed concept and I applaud the use of several personas to demonstrate how this system would work amongst a wide range of people. Well done!

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Thank you:)

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I love the idea. If the voters were able to enter their information before they even go to the voting polls that could save a lot of time.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Thanks Christian, that is exactly what is going to be improved;)

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Photo of Priyanka Kodikal

Great concept! I love how well it fits the different personas!

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DeletedUser

Most of what has been presented can somehow be accomplished here. Great level of abstraction. Great strategic and generic thinking in my view.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I really like how well the interface adapts to different needs.
The only thing I would say this concept is missing though is the fact that it tackles accessibility focusing only in the election day interaction between the system and voter, leaving many other external factors aside (essentially time and trust)

I think there's a lot of good ideas in this two other concepts that could help solve those issues
1) Extending time: http://www.openideo.com/open/voting/concepting/polling-day-s-every-day.-vote-when-you-can-when-you-want-during-any-period-of-an-election-term./

2) Fostering trust: http://www.openideo.com/open/voting/concepting/use-your-bank-or-doctors/

I think they are both great examples of thinking of other reasons why people are deprived from access to voting. Time may clearly play a huge role (think of isolated people that can't make it to the place of voting in time or who are simply not available on that day). And (dis)trust is an issue that many countries are facing: be it because of corruption, disaffection, etc.

Overall, yours is a great contribution to the challenge and it could be a valid winning candidate as it is right now! Congrats for the effort :)

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hello Borja, thanks for the examples. It is true that the concept focuses only on the voting moment, and should be combined with several other concepts. I tried to enhance the overall voting experience in my other concept: http://bit.ly/xVIw29 which turns the voting into a festival, and I did not combine the two ideas because they can also grow up independently. There is also another festival example: http://bit.ly/AjmGH0 which suggests to extend the time! So many of us have similar ideas in mind and I am sure these will merge an become a whole system by the end of the challenge. Fostering trust, I guess focuses more on the poll clerks. In fact, that same concept can also enable the computers in the hospitals and banks to be used for voting.

To be honest, above all, the first challenge to solve in this concept is to design the portable ballot which will enable privacy.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I completely agree that portability and adaptability to personal conditions and abilities is the key to improve privacy and independence. Hope to see this challenge evolve among the top finalist soon in the refinement phase!

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Photo of Vincent Cheng

An intuitive, easy-to-use guide for polling clerks to meet diverse voter needs...brilliant.

Loving your concept's core idea Cansu!

I'm also thinking there's an opportunity to make an analog form of this as well (whether a visual chart, or a choose-your-own-adventure/identify-this-guide type of flipbook).

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Photo of Vincent Cheng

Hi Cansu. By analog form, I mean your idea may also work well on physical paper in cases where higher tech solutions are not feasible, such as an easy-to-use flip book that guides you through a series of simple questions & visual charts.

For example, look at this page from a book used to identify trees: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v31/kbaumle/Blog%20Phoyos/what%20tree%20is%20that/page45.jpg

In terms of high tech vs. low tech solutions, I agree it depends on the situation. In the US at least, where the challenge partner (Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk) is based, there's certainly possibility for mobile/online solutions like ours ;)

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Photo of Vincent Cheng

Oh, here's another example of an analog/paper-based form: those classic Choose Your Own Adventure children's books http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_W_4MyIMHk-Y/TCpMXOpciyI/AAAAAAAAAoc/_5sSqG3gdvw/s1600/PyramidX_6-7-small.jpg

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Photo of Paul Reader

Agreed Vincent - as in your book on identifying trees both paper and computer-based expert systems are well suited to this task, as are informal flow-charts.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Ok I see:) For instance, in a low cost solution, instead of having a single app guiding you on how to vote, you would have a paper guide with different kind of paths on how you vote. Could we also include more 'activities,' such as watching a video of all the parties before voting, sticking an 'I voted' sticker' (included in the back of the paper guide), etc. As I see, there is a definite need to create a low-cost version of the idea of 'having a different voting process for people with different needs.'

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Photo of Ashley Jablow

Makes me think a bit of Tristan's Mother Mati flip book concept from our Maternal Health Challenge! http://bit.ly/lAip66

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Wow yea they made a great link between the digital and analogue means of giving information. This is so smart! Ashley, I am also a bit confused, are we also looking into the low-income communities? What is the evaluation criteria?

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Photo of Ashley Jablow

Good question Cansu - in general, low-income communities are not specifically being considered as a focus for this challenge, but that's not to say that their needs won't match up with many of the other accessibility needs we're designing for (language, literacy, mobility, disability etc). Check out our Guiding Principles for more http://bit.ly/AiJnLW as well as our Concepting Tips http://bit.ly/AdbEH2 for insight into evaluation criteria.

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Photo of Ashley Jablow

Great points Cansu. The analog idea is just one suggested direction this concept could take. If you think there's another concept in there, go ahead and upload it – we'd love to see it! But be sure to act fast as Concepting ends after this weekend.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Ashley, I updated the concept again adding a fast way of National ID verification. It can be linked with this concept since it suggests a the use of a mobile app, but it can also be developed separately. Now I do not know if I should add it as a new concept..

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Photo of Ashley Jablow

Wow Cansu, I'm really excited about the updates you've made! I think it's really your choice if you'd like to separate out the two ideas – you're right: they do work together but they could also exist separately. Either way they're great, so it's your choice. Great job!

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Cansu, I love the way you have built out this idea and nice use of the personas to think through the scenarios. The scenario with Angela where she asks for one interface, but the app is able to suggest an alternative she didn't know about is a powerful example.

I could also see this being used for poll worker training, building their ability to recognize alternatives.

Could the core of this concept also be an online app that voters could use to think about which voting method they prefer? I could see it connecting to one of the concepts like the Accessibility Map, so voters could check the location and hours of the nearest vote center (for early voting) or polling place (for election day).

It could be flexible enough to fit in many places in elections. It would be great to have a consistent way of answering these questions.

I also love the way the basic idea could be high tech (tablet or online), low tech (simple PC application) or even non-tech (as in Vincent's suggestion).

One other thought: would you be able to either add a voice-over to your video, or put the text into the description so that everyone can read it?

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Hi Whitney, thank you for the comments:) The format can definitely be used for poll clerk training. I am sure the complicated training they have to go through can be turned into a much more interactive and easy to use process!

Building a public online app is a good idea. It can involve info on the candidates, polling places, asking for a personal assistant beforehand, etc. Keeping the same interface, the app can be developed to be used any internet browser, or be implemented to smart phones. The Accessibility Map is brilliant! Imagine that a voter is looking for the polling place and the app directs him to the nearest location using the GPS system.

I am a bit worried about letting voters decide on which method of voting they prefer. The core purpose of the app is to help select the most appropriate way of voting for a particular person in a fast and not troublesome way. Why would the voter bother to learn about all the different voting methods and try to figure out which fits him most? Imagine a person with no obstacles, why would that person spend time on this beforehand? Plus, how many different voting options should be there for people with no obstacles? In case there is an option to chose, then there should be sufficient number of options..

Well, now a question with an assumption..in case choosing your own voting method is important, then, how can it be attractive to people, even to the ones who neglect voting in the first place? To chose 'the voting method that fits you', a voter can be given a psychological quiz like in girls magazines: 'Which animal are you?' or 'What celebrity do you match with.' Now it sounds very lame, but the test could be fun and useful; it can analyze if the voter understands more text based information, audial, or visual..

However, I still think the voting process should be kept simple. Instead of giving the time and energy on deciding on the best method of voting, a voter can be given more interesting information on the candidates. The app can decide on the voting method if one logs in the necessary information. Also, some things can not be predicted beforehand. May be Amy did not if the environment required her to carry her kid in her arm.

I really want to use some post its in our conversation:) We need to suggest this to open IDEO:))

Thanks for the final input, the voice over and text description are coming asap.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

brilliant idea! by using this, voters really don't have to worry about location or traffic! and a big investment of time and tech...well i think it is worthwhile!

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Thanks Jiangxuan (how do you pronounce your name?)
I also find it worthwhile to invest in a long term system and temporary solutions.

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Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Hi Cansu, great illustrations, I would actually suggest that the clerks will be able to guide the disabled to the right workstation without this beautiful iPad/paper guide, if such variety of workstation existed. I think a guide/check-list inspired by your thinking could help building voting workstations for the different scenarios when setting up the voting centre though.

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Photo of Meena Kadri

Interesting thoughts Jakob. One thing that an app/paper guide would help with would be to support independent voting which is a central focus we've listed on our tips for Concepting: http://bit.ly/vote_tips We welcome all ideas & discussion which suggest ways to do this – including for different scenarios as you suggest. Especially thinking about our recently posted personas: http://bit.ly/vote_personas Looking forward to ongoing conversations and concepts from all of you!

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DeletedUser

Agree, this guide seems very useful if the voters can access it themselves and see that there is many possibilities for them to vote, and that people do care if they do!

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Meena, the personas are just perfect! I am planning to draw a scenario for each persona and see if the system can fit all. It will look fun now that we have names for each character:)

Jakob, the reason I left the mobility part open is because the clerks can actually move to the voter as well. The concept focuses on the app, while it is open to be completed with the optimum

A. Booth that ensures privacy (working on that)

B. Scenario where poll clerks can go to the voter (such as http://www.openideo.com/open/voting/concepting/super-clerks/)

What you said actually makes a lot of sense for the scenario A. Why would the units be mobile if they are used in a specific voting place, right?

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DeletedUser

I am wondering if the poll worker will be visiting voters, how will fraud be prevented?
How can you make sure only registered voters vote. Maybe it needs to be connected to ID-reader, or other identification system (weather that is credit card of social security number or tax contribution based).
It would be cool if it where as easy as Login using Facebook ;)

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

That is one of the main challenges. Hm, no matter what obstacles a voter has, for sure he/she has a face, so may be taking a photo using the phone cam, and recognizing the person would be the most optimistic and fast scenario. I guess this concept is growing to be high tech, but if we are designing long lasting in the coming years, then it is possible..

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Making it as easy as logging in to Facebook is not particularly difficult if the principles of public/private key encryption are employed. However, facial recognition could be employed if sufficiently cost-effective.

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Facial recognition was just not good..And linking facebook with a national id might not be something everyone wants.

Since the poll clerk is with the voter in the beginning, 'logging in' could be viewed by him as the voter is helped to put his/her national id number in. When the number is put, the name and a photo of the voter can appear, the clerk would know that it is the correct person, and then leave the phone to the voter. Is it actually faster or slower than just showing your id card..?

Or, the 'logging in' can be completely separate! A voter can lend his/her id card to the poll clerk to take the phone and vote privately. Meanwhile, the poll clerk can register that this person came and voted, not relating the logging in process to his vote at all. When the voting is complete, the voter can take his is id back and give the phone back to the clerk.

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DeletedUser

I like it
I this solution could be expanded to sign language, other written languages or pictos.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

wow I should definitely sketch some scenarios using sign language!

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Congrats on this post being today's Featured Concept!

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Yes its so exciting:)

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DeletedUser

I love the idea of providing multiple options for different type of people. I think it would also be important to allow voters to have a say in the options they are provided. It can be difficult to asses what a voter needs in a matter of seconds. Each individual of any ability is an expert in their own needs. Maybe there is a way to include the voter's voice in the process like asking the voter what they need and then providing them with options.

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Thank you for your comment. This is so true! May be the poll clerk can ask the voter and have the freedom to set the input and output method in the beginning of the app. If he does not know what to do, then he can let the app suggest the most convenient method.

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Great start to the concepting phase!
This concept highlights that this challenge demand multiple solutions.
In order to make solutions as universal as possible we will need solutions that address three levels of participation:
High end participation through leading edge technology (e.g.. smartphones, tablets, on-line);
Majority participation depending on jurisdiction (e.g. better access to existing facilities, redesign of ballots, using ordinary mobile phones); and
Marginalised participation (e.g. marble voting, other creative ways for non-literate voters, educational and language support).
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Thanks Paul. Can this concept address the majority participation as well? The 'app' can be developed in a more primitive version, and can be used with an old computer, a webcam, headphones and a microphone. For instance, instead of 'tapping the screen 3 times,' the voter can be asked to 'click 3 times with the mouse.' In that case, the mobility of the process is restricted, but the cost is lowered down.

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DeletedUser

We could also use vocal recognition systems to increase people who can use the service as well security (we could use voice to secure voters as an additional way to do it).
Then smartphone\computers will propose voting options that are visual and audio.

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Photo of Cansu Akarsu

Exactly! We can create so many different voting methods using all the sensors and possibilities. You can see the second scenario, the final images display one person with two broken arms, voting by voice recognition.

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Cansu, I love how you've incorporated some scenarios to help us visualize how this concept would work! As you get feedback (like Sarah's great points below) be sure to update your entry to incorporate any builds and suggestions you'd like. Ideas evolve throughout the Concepting phase so keep the updates coming!

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Thanks for the support! I added one where the poll clerk asks the voter if she has a preference to vote. Hope to get more comments and make more changes:)

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You might also want to update and give your thoughts on the optional fields about resources, adaptability, etc. within the Concepting form. This all helps others evaluate your concept against various criteria we are focusing on – especially if you make it through to the Evaluation phase shortlist ;^) You can check out more guidelines here: http://bit.ly/vote_tips