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Urban Food Hubs Solution

Urban food hubs concept in urban slums to address food security demands, by utilizing bio-intensive, aquaponic, and hydroponic production.

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

This idea solves the problem of food insecurity in urban slums through high efficiency food production sites that utilizes bio-intensive, aquaponic, and hydroponic production methods. With extreme climate changes, food security is a major issue that needs to be addressed in order to have food to feed the millions of people in urban slums during major climatic changes.
This idea hopes to replicate UDC's Urban Food Hub's concept which focuses on water management, waste reduction, and reuse through composting, food security, and minimizing pressure on urban land and infrastructure systems.
UDC can provide the technology, training and expertise to locals/private sector on how to build these models, and slum dwellers can provide the labor which addresses job creation.
Hydroponics is a method of growing large amounts of vegetables/plants in water with no soil, in limited space and reduced growing time. An aquaponics system allows the growth of tilapia and vegetables in a self-sustaining closed loop system. Using a aquaponics systems eliminates the need for commercial fertilizers (harmful to the environment) because fish tank water is used as fertilizer. It also uses only 10% of the water used to grow plants in soil. The use of a solar well pump creates self-sufficiency by generating its own power for irrigation and fertigation.
All slum dwellers will be able to register to purchase food through a food plan depending on the household size. Credit options could be offered.

WHO BENEFITS?

The urban slum dwellers benefit from food security, job creation, economic development and environmental sustainability. The environment is protected by the use of solar energy, and organic compost instead of chemicals. This idea can be implemented in areas that have pockets of urban slum dwellings, many in second and third tier cities in Kenya, where there is some space. This will sustain agricultural farming in urban cities as opposed to relying on rural farming, and engage young people.

HOW DOES YOUR IDEA TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE CONTEXT OF URBAN SLUMS AND CLIMATE CHANGE?

(12/17/15 Update) Using sustainable agricultural methodologies like Urban Food Hubs focuses on techniques to increase food productivity in smaller, urban land areas, while limiting the use of commercial chemical fertilizers and toxic chemicals for pest control which can have harmful effects on the environment and human health.
If we can utilize the resources provided by agencies such as USTDA to provide feasibility studies and pilot projects, and USAID's Feed the Future program in partnership with local private sector, local NGO's and local government can help ensure food security given the scarcity of resources and changing climate. By utilizing the technology and expertise from UDC's Muirkirk Research Farm to help replicate this concept in Kenya and once successful, it will address the most basic need for families and individuals to have a reliable source of quality food for consumption.
This idea also takes into account the context of low-income settlement areas allowing for the possibility of farming in the city, solar water management, food security, and job creation in the urban slums.
Once proven, this concept could also engage nearby colleges/universities specializing in agriculture, by incorporating it as part of their academic curriculum, and to get hands on practice on real urban farming as is done at UDC.
Engaging local communities who identify with sustaining urban agriculture such as NGO's to facilitate the management and implementation, and the private sector including churches and social groups can provide the market and labor and buy in.

IN-COUNTRY EXPERIENCE

  • Yes, for two or more years

EXPERTISE

  • I’ve worked in a sector related to my idea for at least two years

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS

  • Yes

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

Global Development Consulting Professional, with an MBA in Global Management & MA in Global Affairs
Specialties: Agribusiness, Economic development, Social Entrepreneur.
Eastern Africa Diaspora Business Council, Associate
www.kaptea.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/ckenduywa
www.eadiaspora.org

IS THIS A NEW OR RECENT IDEA FOR YOU OR YOUR ORGANIZATION? HOW DOES IT DIFFER FROM WHAT YOU ARE ALREADY DOING?

(12/17/15 Update) This is a new idea for me, although it adds to a few other ideas I have to improve socio-economic development in Africa. There is proof of this concept currently implemented by UDC in their Muirkirk Research Farm. UDC has signed a few agreements with African leaders through USDA-ARS to develop a leadership curricula and provide training through PPPs. Additionally, I have been involved with agribusiness, promoting Kenyan tea products in the global marketplace for 4 yrs now (www.kaptea.com). So naturally, when I took a tour of the Muirkirk farm, I was immediately drawn to it and thought about the idea of replicating it in places in Africa that could really benefit from growing Urban food hubs to tackle food shortages in Urban cities.
I currently do pro-bono consulting for global development and volunteer with EADBC to engage diaspora resources to promote trade and investment btw the US and East African countries. So I am fully committed to this project and scaling it.

HOW IS YOUR IDEA DIFFERENT FROM OTHER SIMILAR INITIATIVES? WHAT ARE YOU DOING DIFFERENTLY? WHAT UNIQUE ADVANTAGES DO YOU HAVE?

(12/20/15 Update) The unique advantage is that this idea has a proof of concept that is thriving and successful at UDC. This concept also tackles multiple development challenges all at the same time. That includes mass production of food crops and fish in minimal spaces. This concept utilizes water very efficiently, and therefore very little amount of water is used for maximum production. This entails reusing the water bi-product from the fish tanks to fertilize the plants as illustrated in the aquaponic loop system drawing. Because the plant loop and fish loop are connected manually, it allows for the flexibility of growing a wider variety of healthy food plants for consumption. This flexibility in the system also reduces energy use and operating costs. The flow bed system can produce 1500 pounds of fish in two 500 gallon tanks, and 10,000 pounds of vegetables. This idea also provides an opportunity for job creation for the local slum dwellers, because they are able to provide labor needed to maintain the greenhouses. This idea is unique because it creates a sustainable ecosystem that generates food and jobs for the community as well as sustaining agricultural farming technigues.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR UNANSWERED QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR IDEA?

12/20/15 Update) Some of the unanswered questions are:
-Can this concept be scaled to cover many low income settlements in the region?
-Can this be scaled to the point of franchising/licensing to other regions?

One answer is to start small, and apply agile techniques as we progress along the way.

WHY DO YOU THINK THE PROBLEM YOUR IDEA SOLVES FOR HASN'T BEEN SOLVED YET?

(12/20/15 Update) This concept of greenhouses exists but not in an urban community context. Most greenhouses are built by private farmers in their own estates/land, but not for community development in low-income settlements. This would be a new concept, and one that can be scaled up and could produce abundance of food and jobs for dwellers transitioning into the job market as they gain useful and transferrable skills. Engaging the community especially the youth in technical colleges/universities and churches as stakeholders will create sustainability because of their vested interest in engaging young people in urban agricultural techniques that is essential as cities become more populated.

HOW HAS YOUR IDEA CHANGED BASED ON FEEDBACK FROM YOUR COMMUNITY?

Based on feedback from team & Kenyan locals, there has been some changes to the initial plan. We came to understand that slums are transitional homes for people migrating into urban cities, as they look for jobs. So most people who live in slums tend to live there for 6 months - 1 year, and as their financial situation gets better, they move into better low income settlements (which are still slums). So there are different types of slums, ones that are really basic, to those that have some amenities like piped water. Because these low-income settlements (slums) are clustered around affluent neighborhoods, we decided that the Food Hub project will be located offsite at a location that is central enough to employ the slum dwellers. This will be explained in further detail in the implementation stage.
We also learned that there existing greenhouses springing up and that this could be a good opportunity to learn from their best practices, or perhaps even partner up. The fact that there are such projects that have successfully built greenhouses, shows that this project can in fact be implemented, but with a social impact aspect to it as well as the use of different and advanced technology and underserved community engagement. These communities include training youth who have the highest population in urban cities, to engage in urban agricultural farming, include transitioning slum dwellers looking to get trade skills, and local church groups who are eager to volunteer.

WHAT WOULD YOU ULTIMATELY LIKE TO ACHIEVE WITH THIS IDEA? WHAT IS YOUR NEXT STEP TO GET THERE?

Next step is to seek partnership with UDC research Farm's expertise and resources to replicate their concept. The longview is to create a self-sustaining urban agriculture ecosystem in some of the urban cities in Kenya. To dispel the notion that farming only takes place in rural areas, and not cities. And considering that many young people reside in urban cities while the older population in rural areas practice farming is unsustainable, because we need to get the youth/young involved in agriculture by introducing urban farming.
Ultimately, I would like this idea to engage underserved communities in urban cities in sustainable urban farming and not depend on rural agriculture farming.

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Please see reply to Chuomo's question about feedback from the experts. This will give more details on the implementation of this project.

How does your idea connect to the broader system of the city where you plan to implement?

As shown in our illustration, this project will engage different stakeholders in the urban communities, including low income settlements, social groups, NGO's, technical/educational institutions, and the private sector. How they are engaged is as follows;
The project located offsite (a site near a cluster of low-income settlements) will employ slum dwellers who are looking for work, and need transferable skills. Because theses settlements tend to be transitional for most dwellers until they get better jobs and move to proper housing, this will provide a platform for them. Engaging youth from colleges to learn and sustain agricultural farming methods will ensure food security for urban cities and not just rural areas. Engaging local communities and NGO's creates a support system for this concept, and will open up ways to scale the project. The private sector will also provide the market for the food products produced that is healthy and produce in an eco-friendly environment.
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Team (5)

wekesa's profile
wekesa zab

Role added on team:

"A key member of this team, a product designer based in Bungoma - Nairobi , Kenya. Cofounder of a food startup working in the informal food economy, JibondeFresh. He brings indepth knowledge of Kenyan urban cities environment and has experience in human-centered design and implementation. He is also the OpenIDEO community captain for Nairobi."

Caroline's profile
OpenIDEO's profile
OpenIDEO

Role added on team:

"Provide the resources and support to bring this idea to fruition."

Evonne's profile
Tom's profile
Tom Cornish

Role added on team:

"Welcome aboard Tom!!"

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Attachments (3)

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Experience maps

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Experience maps

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Experience Maps

35 comments

Join the conversation:

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Photo of Simone Alexander
Team

Love this idea! This is exactly what we our long-term aim in Kathmandu. Well done and good luck. It's the future of food:)

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Thanks for your comment. We are still looking for options to mobilize this idea. So I'd be happy to hear how your project is taking shape. 

Photo of Simone Alexander
Team

It is great to hear we can share together. In fact, we have just implemented a biogas system that originates from Kenya! We will pilot this system at Herb Nepal and already has success in Africa - so hopefully it will make a success in this region. It is great we can learn from each other, adapt to local environments and grow together to a better, efficient and more sustainable world! Maybe we can organise a global on-line meet-up?

Photo of Simone Alexander
Team

It is great to hear we can share together. In fact, we have just implemented a biogas system that originates from Kenya! We will pilot this system at Herb Nepal and already has success in Africa - so hopefully it will make a success in this region. It is great we can learn from each other, adapt to local environments and grow together to a better, efficient and more sustainable world! Maybe we can organise a global on-line meet-up?

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Caroline!
Below is some feedback from our experts. We look forward to reading your responses!

Help us understand about how specifically you will transfer this idea to new circumstances. How do you plan to implement this idea? Do you have a team assembled? What was learned in the UDC project and how might you do things differently? 

Why is this concept replicable in Kenyan slums? Can this concept be scaled to cover many slums in the region? Can this become a self-sustaining and profitable business for slum dwellers? If so, how do you envision that?

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

After doing much research, it's important to recognize that slum dwellers are not permanently tied to these informal setups in the slums. How it works is that slum dwellers initially settle in the poorest/lowest class of the slums, this is the shanties that are made of basic temporary structures, and thats because these are the cheapest ones available. Then when they are in a better financial situation, they move to a better slum with better structure, and community amenities like centrally locates water tap. And so this means that there are different levels of informal setups, that vary based on affordability, and most dwellers transition from one to another until they find a steady job which will enable them to move out of the slums. So with the notion that slum dwellings are transitional settlements for people who are trying to transform their livelihoods to a better one, we reevaluated the site location for our Food Hub facility. Our team decided to identify possible areas in Nairobi and its vicinity which is  centrally located not too far from these informal settlements and set up operations there. This will allow for slum dwellers living in different slums to access the site. This would also address the fact that there isn't much space within the slums for a site location, but once this pilot project is implemented, it will allow for scaling up for other sites in the future. There are plausible options to purchase or lease a parcel of land within the suburbs of Nairobi where these informal settlements are located. Once we have formalized our partnership with UDC to replicate their model in Kenya, then we will have their experts come in to train our team as well and the local manpower on how to set up the greenhouse and hydro/aquaponics at the site. Setting up these structures will not be a challenge because the  greenhouse technology is not new to Kenya. In fact, this could be an opportunity to explore partnerships with other greenhouse companies/orgs and learn from their best practices in terms of building and construction supplies. 
We shall then use the slum dwellers as the manpower to setting up the hydro/aquaponics structures and offer them an opportunity to acquire transferable skills that they can use when they transition out of the slums. The deployment of labor can be done in cohorts or by function, such as irrigation, mulching, sowing, seedling, planting harvesting, and sales and distribution. Once operations have began, we will create a marketing campaign to get buy-in from the local community about our work, products, technology, etc. Engaging schools, and other community institutions, for tours and labs. This will also give us an opportunity to establish our supply chain and market for our products. One aspect of distribution will be to set up vegetable food trucks with the company logo/signage, and these will be mobile sales spots for our vegetables. These could be located anywhere depending on the demand. We shall also have the harvest trucks in the various slums where slum dwellers can purchase (perhaps at a cheaper rate or through a voucher system). Once profitable and self-sustaining, we believe that this project could successfully be deployed in other urban cities in Kenya, such as Nakuru, Kisumu, Machakos, Kiambu etc. This could also offer an opportunity to franchise/license the business model to other private sector players. 
Our team is comprised of myself, Wekesa, Tom, and Evo. We also have a couple of advisors whom we have access to for advise. The entire team comes from the consulting, engineering background, product design, human centered design, international development, finance, agriculture, entrepreneurship, sales and marketing. We all bring a wide set of skills and can work well together. We are open to adding other team members that can add value to our project. I and some of my team members are ready to hit the ground running and lead the implementation of this project as possible. We can start to engage the stakeholders as soon we get the project award. 

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Thank you for the response Caroline! It's great that many of you are ready to hit the ground running with this idea - is everyone also working elsewhere in Nairobi? Happy holidays and new year to you and your team! 

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Chioma, Happy holidays to you!! Wekesa is currently located in Nairobi. I have two other team members that I recently recruited who are also in Kenya. Tom Cornish currently works for a project on Indian slums, and is open to considering relocation after his assignment  comes to an end in September 2016. However he is happy to work with us remotely prior to then, so he is a valued member of the team. I also have a colleague who has worked with one of the big 4 consulting companies who is able to add value to our team. He is currently located in Bermuda, however makes frequent trips to Kenya. 
Another valuable member is Dr. Temba A, with Temba engineering services. He toured the farm with me and we both had an interest in teaming up to take this idea to Africa. 

Photo of Tom Cornish
Team

Hey Chiome - I'm just going to add a few comments to Caroline's (hers being the primary for sure).

Firstly, for scaleability, the system should be modular and be able to operate on many size factors. This will also reduce the cost barrier with a smaller system and prototype being set up just for local people. We should be able to change the size of the system based on the requirements in the area and land required. Further, a small modular prototype is the fastest and most efficient way to test this product in the communities - a fundamental for human centred design and achieving the best product and iterating before commencing larger scale operations. A small modular structure could also allow different shapes and layout based on the slums structure, and water drainage dynamics/elevations. A modular structure will also allow it to be PORTABLE, a very important factor when considering impermanent and moving communities. We wouldn't want our first site to be stranded with fixed infrastructure only for it to become redundant as development progresses and the slum dwellers are kicked off their land (unless they are permanent, legal slums as our target market). 

If we start small and grow big this will also reduce the need to transport trucks in the first stages of design. 

Another consideration as Caroline mentions is the transient nature of these slums and their dwellers - and the often illegal land they sit on. A barrier to entry of improved houses here in the Indian slums is that they can't look "permanent". As soon as a landowner thinks that a permanent structure is being created they are not so happy.  They much prefer them to feel impermanent so they can take them over at a moments notice. If we buy our own land this won't be a problem, but buying land in cities is not the cheapest way to infiltrate our market.

I believe there will be a suitable slum with adequate land within the city (based on my experience mapping 3 tier two cities in India and over 1300 slums). We just have to find it. It would be important to map the slums and gain data and insights of our target market before we look to spend too much money on products. The consumers know best.

There is a lot more we need to define of course, this will come in time.
Thanks,
Tom. 

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Chioma, 

In addition to what our team have already stated, I would like to underscore the potential for this project to lift people out of poverty or out of the urban slums/temporary settlements. Part of the business model to make it possible to achieve this goal, is by employing the low income/urban settlers, they gain some for of equity in the system and once they put in their time and sweat, they not only gain transferrable technical skills but they also gain equity in which they continue to have profit share or even capped residual income after they have completed their employment assignment at the facility. This is all dependent on a profitable business model which we hope will create capacity to expand to other locations/regions/countries. 

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Today I had an exploratory meeting with the Dean of UDC's Research Farm, and gained some valuable feedback. Here is a summary:
- UDC currently has an MOU with Malawi to develop a similar project in Malawi. This means that UDC is open to building partnerships to replicate their technology in Africa. This would also allow us to learn from their best practices. 
-Getting buy in from the local communities such as church organizations, academic institutions, local governments and NGO's is very crucial for the project/idea to become sustainable and successful. 
-This is how our partnership would be implemented with UDC; Ideally, a team of 5-6 members of our team are invited to UDC for a 10 day training course on how to set up, run and operate the system. Then she will send her team of 3 experts to go and assist with the set up in Kenya.
-The capital costs involved are cost to purchase and set up the system (fish farm patented technology) as well training costs for our team. Other costs ofcourse will involve freight logistics, land purchase/lease, operating and overhead cost.  Once in operation, the system requires no maintenance, but just runs on 1 horsepower pump. So this means that there are no major recurring maintenance costs. 

That was just a high level summary of what our project would look like to get it off the ground. It will require us to create relationships with our main stakeholders, and reaching out especially to those that can pave the way and embrace this kind of development. 
Since I already have an existing relationship with the Kenyan Embassy here in Washington DC, I will reach out to them with a proposal. The same applies to academic institutions and local organizations in Kenya. 
This insight can be used to set expectations on the project implementation stages, and depending on the award, can be modified accordingly. Comments??


@Chioma Ume
  Tom Cornish Wekesa Zablon   

Photo of Brittany Johnson
Team

I think this is great and so important to address both the nutritional and employment challenges! Two questions come to mind. You mention that the greenhouses can provide employment to low income residents. Who/what organization would be in charge of managing operations over the long term?

Also, given the complexity of low income circumstances, you've planned for employment to provide skills that staff can use to transition to new circumstances. What are the jobs that these greenhouse alumns could plan on transitioning to?

All the best in moving forward with your work!

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Brittany, 
Great questions!! In terms of who will run/manage operations over the long term, since this is a project that is new and starting from scratch, my team and I are dedicated to manage the operation of the project. I have experience in business management and operations, and team brings valuable skills in the the business. One is a human centered project designer, and another is currently working with slums in India. We shall definitely add more team members as the project unfolds.  
In terms of labor, we shall recruit from the low income settlements, perhaps in cohorts in order to accommodate larger volume. We plan to have a structured process so that those that we recruit will not only learn agricultural skills, like mulching, seedling, composting etc, but also general trade and technical skills, like building, transportation, sales, food handling etc. And once they have gained those skills they will be more marketable when they move on to look for other jobs. They will also benefit from having our project on their resume. More details on implementing this will be fleshed out as the project unfolds. This is just a high level response to your questions, and we welcome other ideas on how to ensure knowledge transfer. 

Photo of Tom Cornish
Team

Hey Brittany thank you so much for your comment and questions.

We would have to facilitate a wider discussion with the project team, so please take this response as my own thoughts based on my experience operating in similar environments in India and empowering locals.

Who would manage operations in the long term? The best outcome is to empower the local people themselves from the communities involved. While there is a high cost of capital depending on the system size, this can be paid off in produce - until the locals have fully paid for the system themselves. After they have paid for the system and our team has trained them to run/operate/maintain the system they can continue to service it themselves with local materials. In the short term we would provide the finance and the training to the locals until the can self sustain the model. They can then help us expand into new territories and become advocates for other systems.

What are the jobs they can transition to? Well there are many! Of course this experience will contribute to their CV and be applicable across many other jobs if they choose to shift. Otherwise they can continue with operations and management of the system themselves - or expand into offering servicing and other systems. The aim is to educate, train and empower the people so they make better business and financial decisions within their own lives and give them a taste of entrepreneurship so they can continue with their own ideas. (also at the heart of human centred design). 

Good questions and I hope we can flesh them out in later stages of the project a little more than my brief explanations here!

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Great response and insights Tom!! 

Photo of Rafael Machado
Team

I like the idea. My question will be how to apply this in high dense cities where empty space doesn´t exist. probably the roofs couls be an option

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Rafael, 
That's a great question, and hence the reason why it would be a great idea to implement this idea in slums 2nd tier cities, where there is a bit of extra land. Once proven, then this could be replicated in the larger slum cities, by either using rooftops, or even coordinating with the government to lend a piece of land within or surrounding the slums for the project. The slums are located on government land, so creating a PPP with government might be a solution. 

Photo of wekesa zab
Team

Think of integrating this with the urban planning departments in Cities or town. Most of this regions are quickly urbanising and even access to public spaces it a challenge. Maybe the even the only available spaces might be schools, or religious institution's owned spaces. These are the places that might to secure to host and sustainably manage these farms.

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Great point Wekesa!!

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Instead of using rooftops, we will implement this idea offsite, a location that can be accessed by the slum dwellers, and to be able to scale this sustainably, we need the space.

Photo of Tom Cornish
Team

Green WALLS are also a good option for vertical farming Rafael, and could provide much needed insulation to these often impermanent structures. Food for thought...

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

http://nairobiplanninginnovations.com/2015/12/23/the-case-for-more-urban-farming-in-nairobi/

Here is a great article shared by team member Wekesa . The article builds a case for the need for urban farming not only in urban slums but in regular up and coming neighbourhoods in Kenya like Nyayo estate. Our urban food hubs idea would address many of the issues she raised about food contamination and so on. It will also address the idea of commercialising urban farming. 

Photo of Evonne Heyning
Team

Let's talk more about collaboration! I run a game company teaching people how to grow food together @GrowGames and my idea for this challenge is here: https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/urban-resilience/ideas/living-learning-labs-container-gardens-from-sea-to-city/

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Evo,

Thank you for your note and invitation to collaborate. Did you make it to the feedback stage? Let's explore the idea of collaboration and how we can put ideas together. I can be reached at carolkenns@gmail.com

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Evo, 
I welcome your collaboration. Please get in touch with me via carolkenns@gmail.com. Thanks!!

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Evo, 

Happy holidays!! I wanted to circle back with you regarding your interest in collaborating with our team. I think you could add great value to our team. Please email me at carolkenns@gmail.com.

Photo of wekesa zab
Team

Hi Caroline .thanks for adding me to the team. Saw a this post http://blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/road-greener-future?cid=EXT_WBBlogSocialShare_D_EXT thought it might be of value to this idea.. 
All the best,
Wekesa

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

I love it!! Thats great!! Thanks for sharing.

Photo of wekesa zab
Team

Hallo Caroline,
 I am Interested in this, can we do a bi-lateral on the same.. Any Luck you are able to join us for our weekly openIDEO meet ups in Nairobi,Fridays from 2pm at PAWA254.

( https://novoed.com/prototyping-fall-2015?referral_token=PACU00086 )

Thanks
Wekesa
Wekesa

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Wekesa,

Unfortunately, I cannot join the meet ups in Nairobi because I reside in Washington DC. Thanks for your support. Let's make it happen.

Photo of wekesa zab
Team

That's Great,
openIDEO has meetups globally am sure of one in DC. It might also be of use to factor in the social economics of the highlighted areas of deployment. How the people in the region are dealing with the challenges they face now and any possible touch points towards realization on this concept to the targeted beneficiaries.
Lets keep the conversations moving , UDC is doing a good job in this space with Muirkirk Research Farm, am curious to Know their exist local partnerships in Kenya to offer context support.

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Hi Wekesa,

You raised a good question about if there is an existing project similar to this. That would be a good question to raise during your meet ups in NBI. Lets communicate via email carolkenns@gmail.com, and we can chart out how to get this idea to move forward. Feel free to bring in a team that can add value to this. Looking forward to hearing from you. Thanks!!

Photo of Norbert Pap
Team

Well I believe it is a great idea which would not only ensure that the urban communities are resilient to climate change but would ensure that climate change problem is addressed to a certain extent since the idea itself ensures environmental sustainability while providing economic gains for the slum dwellers. I believe in developing countries it is imperative that the government should actively promote this model as this could provide an alternate development model while also being environment friendly.

Photo of Caroline Kenduywa
Team

Thanks for your comment Nobert. I'm open to any feedback or critique on the idea. Please feel free to chip in. Thanks!!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congrats on making it to the Feedback Phase Caroline! We would love it if you can take some time to answer the new Refinement questions that we've added to your original idea submission form. To answer the new questions, hit the Edit Contribution button at the top of your post. Scroll down to the entry fields of the new Refinement questions. Hit Save when you are done editing.

Also, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 11/16" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!