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Vetiver plants with deep root systems

Making ground moisture to collect rainwater

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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

During Typhoon season, people experience to wether hazards and disasters such as mudslide and flood. The major problem is ground cannot fully collect rainwater because there is nothing to slow them. The study of His Majesty the King, Thailand, the 'vetiver plants' is a special features to help prevent the flood and mudslide. Vetiver, a very fast growing grass and until very recently a relatively unknown plant, possesses some unique features of both grasses and trees by having profusely grown, deep penetrating root system that can offer both erosion prevention and control of shallow movement of surfacial earth mass. When planted in row, vetiver plants will form thick hedges and with their stiff stems these hedges can stand up to at least 0.6m, forming a living barrier which slows and spreads runoff water. Appropriately laid out these hedges can act as very effective diversion structures spreading and diverting runoff water to stable areas or proper drains. Some special characteristics of vetiver grass; 1. Extremely deep and massive finely structured root system, capable of reaching down to two to three metres in the first year. This extensive and thick root system binds the soil and at the same time makes it very difficult to be dislodged and extremely tolerant to drought. 2. New roots are developed from nodes when buried by trapped sediment. Vetiver will continue to grow with the new ground level eventually forming terraces, if trapped sediment is not removed.

WHO BENEFITS?

People in a community will get a big benefit, as they are local people who live in the area and experiences the result of growing vetiver plants to prevent flood and collecting rainwater from the ground.

HOW DOES YOUR IDEA TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE CONTEXT OF URBAN SLUMS AND CLIMATE CHANGE?

Grow vetiver plants far from surrounding urban area, to stop rainfall in to the city. For example, growing vetiver plants on the mountain because plants prevent soil erosion and help keep moisture in the soil as well. The cultivation of steep slopes and along the diagonal of the channel. In the very high rainfall areas, to reduce this potentially negative effect of vetiver grass technology on steep slopes, as an extra protection, vetiver hedges could be planted on a gradient of about 0.5% as in graded contour terraces to divert the extra water to stable drainage outlets. This practice has been very successfully used in Thailand, Malaysia, and other countries in South East Asia.

IN-COUNTRY EXPERIENCE

  • Not yet

EXPERTISE

  • I do not have experience working in a sector related to my idea

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS

  • This idea is meant to inspire - I hope someone else takes it on!

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

My name is Ekkachai (Henry), I am MBA study from University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) I am Thai, and this is a study of His Majesty the King to conduct a study on the vetiver grass to prevent rainfall.

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Team

Hi Henry,

Our proposal shares common interest regarding the attributes of vegetation and deep root systems to stabilize steep land often found in spontaneous settlements. Your proposal is interesting because of the technical input given regarding appropriate root systems. We believe your project can provide useful information respective the selection of the suitable trees and root systems.

For further information about our idea:
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/urban-resilience/ideas/r4r-recycling-for-resilience-by-waste-pickers/

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