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Experiential Installation x Urban Marketplace

Art and shared experiences create a universal language that will bind a humanitarian effort to deliver climate change awareness.

Photo of Dominique Narciso
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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

Our proposal seeks to capitalize upon existing outdoor marketplaces which are the center of slum communities. These established areas for exchange, already provide an amicable venue for development of temporary pop-ups in public spaces to foster community engagement and curiosity. The concept is to design an open-air, interactive space at urban slum marketplaces that can engage the community with an experience related to climate change and resilience. Based on the popularity of tactical urbanism interventions, these are spaces to nurture conversations and dialogue, contain exhibits and information about resiliency, spark creativity, and play games. The outdoor installation design will incorporate elements of light, water, shade, and seating, built with sustainable materials and can be constructed with local labor. The site will be in the vicinity of booths at local markets selling goods, but in a large enough space to hold groups meandering through. The greatest impact on learning is experience, and in this space, participants will be surrounded by materials, tools, and sights related to resilience and climate change awareness. The installation will provide a multi-dimensional, multi-generational space allowing participants to learn at their own pace and engage in experiential education rather than a structured, educational info session.

WHO BENEFITS?

This project will benefit anyone in the community who is open to exploring, learning, and engaging with the pop-up space. This idea can be implemented in any community that has an existing marketplace and open space to create an installation. Different areas will require different designs, but the concept could be anywhere there is a community to serve. For a community, an installation could serve as a platform for future coordination of existing resources and hub for collaboration.

HOW DOES YOUR IDEA TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE CONTEXT OF URBAN SLUMS AND CLIMATE CHANGE?

The goal is to spark community participation in a spatial installation at local marketplaces and bring awareness to resiliency and climate change. Well-designed large-scale installations will create an experience where education will come naturally. Rather than creating something new, the installation takes existing innovative ideas and experiential knowledge and designs a space for generative and personal conversations to take place. This idea capitalizes on existing services, programs, people, and organizations by creating a gathering space. By bringing a variety of players into the same space, it is a chance to assess what is already out there, where there is room for growth and innovation, and offers the opportunity to forge and strengthen social capital. It is flexible enough to be adaptable in any community. These are not static spaces and can evolve throughout the several month lifespan of a project. Hopefully, by creating a space to strengthen social infrastructure, conversations will continue once the pop-up comes down, and some newly developed alliances, programs, and strategies will be formed. This project thrives on community input and participation. By creating a buzz around a marketplace installation, this will encourage community pride and promote community resilience.

IN-COUNTRY EXPERIENCE

  • Yes, for two or more years

EXPERTISE

  • I’ve worked in a sector related to my idea for at least two years

GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS

  • Yes

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

Our team is comprised of creative individuals with experience in system design, grassroots community development, international development, resiliency and sustainability design, architecture, and government housing and federal emergency management.

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