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Motivations Interactive Guide [Updated 8 Feb 2015]

Our idea is an interactive worksheet that tackles the challenge of designing renewable energy projects that effectively motivate whole communities by teaching project leaders to assemble a wider range of motivations for their communities.

Photo of Nathan Lucy

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What’s the big idea?

Our project is all about teaching leaders to identify the right motivations to leverage for their renewable energy projects to succeed. Before diving into how our idea does this job, let us explain the psychology behind it.
 

Motivation

A motivation is a reason for acting or behaving in a particular way. Our idea frames motivations as transactions between different players whom we label “Givers” and “Receivers”. The currency of the transaction is an “Incentive”. 

Don’t let our fancy language intimidate you. You’re already an expert on motivation. Think about how you might encourage a child to sit still during an important but uncomfortable medical examination. You could offer to reward them for complying with a trip to see sea lions at the zoo afterwards. (And for closure, imagine that it works, and soon the child is laughing at those funny mammals, having forgotten the procedure entirely.) In this example, you’re the Giver. You give the child an Incentive—the promise of seeing the sea lions, and the child is then the Receiver. If you’re successful, Motivation has happened: You gave the child an effective reason to endure the procedure. This is how Motivation works: Sales Executives (Givers) create milestone bonuses (Incentives) for their Salespeople (Receivers) to encourage sales (Motivation); A group of nations (Givers) offers to remove sanctions (Incentive) from an offending nation (Receiver) to encourage it to treat its citizens more humanely (Motivation). We summarize the relationship between the different parts of a Motivation with this formula:

    Motivation = Giver ⨉ Receiver ⨉ Incentive (M = GRI)

But you don’t have to be good at math to use this tool. Remember, you already know how motivation works. We’re just going to apply it in a new context, community-based renewable energy projects.
 

Relationships

In communities, there are lots of players: governments, businesses, households, energy companies—even the “community” at large. All are Givers and Receivers of different kinds of Incentives. For example, businesses generating their own power can receive access to the electric grid from energy companies, and businesses can give the community education by offering tours of their energy production system. There are all kinds of ways to motivate renewable energy adoption.
 

Incentives

Not only are there many possible Giver-Receiver relationships, but there are also many kinds of Incentives. Our tool highlights the following categories of Incentives.


 

  1. Practical :: People who want electricity in areas that are off the grid have a reason to invest in renewables. Otherwise, they'll be hauling fuel and burning it in a generator. For example, in this Research post, an off-the-grid island village community gave themselves energy independence by installing renewable energy generators on their island.
     
  2. Financial :: Stipends are a strong incentive, especially for businesses and families who are asking, Is this financially responsible? How long will it be before I see a return on my investment? (The unpopular side of financial incentives is taxation—dis-incentivizing dependence upon non-renewable energy sources by levying taxes.) For example, in this Research post, a utility company gave a business a stipend to help them pay for their solar array. 
     
  3. Social :: Whether it's the approval of a parent of the applause of colleagues or public thanks from a community leader, people love recognition. It might not be material, but don't discount it. It's meaningful, and it’s usually free!
     
  4. Emotional :: We all want to feel good about ourselves. Many people who believe that investing in renewable energy is the right thing to do—for themselves, their family, humanity, and the world. So when they invest in renewable energy, they get a boost to their self-image. For example, in this Research post, a business owner who installed a solar array at his manufacturing plant says, "It's just the right thing do!" 
 

What can users do with this tool?

User Journey

Before we dive into specific features, let’s begin with user's journey. Our tool was developed to assist users in the design/planning phase of RE projects. This first image shows where that phase occurs in the larger context of a RE project.

The following series of images details the user’s experience with our tool. [Images added 8 Feb 2015.]
  1. User begins RE project’s design phase.


     
  2. User feels need for more knowledge about motivating stakeholders in their community to adopt RE. 


     
  3. User visits Online Interactive Grid. User gains new knowledge and idea.


     
  4. User prints Printable Worksheet. Inspired by the examples in the Guide, they fill in their own ideas. (User is synthesizing their local expertise with the wide range of ideas in the Guide.)


     
  5. User incorporates their motivation ideas into their project design.


     
  6. User executes RE project.


     
  7. User shares their learnings with the editors of the Motivation Guide by email (Versions 1.0 - 1.3) or by direct input online (Version 1.4 and up).


     
  8. User evaluates the Motivations they implemented by voting on the website (Version 1.4 and up).


As the User Journey implies, our tool has two parts: an online interactive grid and a printable worksheet.

 

The Online Interactive Grid

The online guide is where the user will learn about Motivations. In Part 3 of the user experience outlined above, the user interacts with the online guide. This section will walk through the functionality step by step.

(Note: All of these features will be implemented in Version 1.0, except where indicated. For details about versions, see the Product Requirements Document linked from the functionality section below.)

Step 1 :: The empty Interactive Grid awaits user input.



Step 2 :: The user sets the Region and chooses a Receiver type from the drop-down menu. This step enables the user, who is likely a renewable energy project leader for a given community, to find the most relevant content for their community and project. (Note: This filtering feature would be implemented in version 1.2.)


Step 3 :: The Grid displays a range of Incentives for Givers and Receivers color-coded by Incentive Type—Emotional, Practical, Financial or Social. To find out more, the user chooses a particular combination of Giver and Receiver by selecting a Giver column, a Receiver row, and clicking/touching the cell at their intersection. In our example, the user is interested in how their utility companies can help incentivize local businesses.


Step 4 :: The available Incentives populate in the sidebar on the right. In our example, the user is interested in the Financial Incentives, so they select the Income Incentive.


Step 5 ::
The Incentive box opens up to display a list of links for further reading. In Version 1.0, these will all be external web links. In Version 1.1, we will begin adding user-generated content. (As users generate new content, we will have more ideas for the user in Step 3.)

 

Printable Worksheet

This worksheet corresponds to Parts 4 and 5 of the user experience outlined above. The user prints the worksheet. Then they fill in their own ideas inspired by what they've discovered in the Online Interactive Grid, applying it to their own context. In the very earliest version, users access the worksheet here.

What functionality does this tool have?

This tool has several features that fall into (4) main functional categories. Each category relates to knowledge, i.e., ideas and anecdotes on motivating different stakeholders.The categories are sharing, using, gathering, and curating knowledge. Gathering and curation were not covered above, because we plan to implement these functions later. Our Product Requirements Document—a fancy name for the development plan we came up with together—details the full proposed feature set in the human-centric terms of “user stories”. Please open it now, noting that it contains 2 sheets.
 

Knowledge-Sharing

We’re presenting the user with a lot of knowledge, and we plan to gather much more knowledge as we iterate our design. In order to make this knowledge accessible, we designed the online interactive grid.

 

Knowledge-Using

Not only will we share knowledge with the user, but we will also give them a tool to capture their own ideas inspired by the knowledge they’ve gained. We have designed a printable worksheet for the user to capture inspiring ideas they gain from the Motivations Interactive Guide. We left a lot of room for the user to generate their own ideas inspired by what they’ve learned. These worksheets will be valuable tools for individual project leaders as well as workshops with their project stakeholders.
......
 

Knowledge-Gathering

Users will be invited to share their success stories and cautionary tales with the editors of the Motivations Interactive Guide. (At first, through email. Later, through a web interface. See the PRD for proposed development sequence.) This input means the content will grow in detail and in quantity. Our editors currently document Motivations (which each have one Giver, Receiver, and Incentive) in our Content spreadsheet. We’ll introduce a more robust content management system in Version 1.1.

 

Knowledge-Curation

Not only do we want to grow the content in detail and quantity, but we also want to optimize its value. Knowledge gathered from users will be curated by an editor (Versions 1.1 - 1.3). In a later version, voting input from the community will surface the best motivations (Version 1.4 and on).


 

What’s the vision for this tool?

Our Team’s Commitment

We’re committed and capable of developing this tool through Version 1.2, and we’re open to going farther.
 

Resources and Partnerships

  • Resources :: Our team has the design and development talent needed to take this idea forward.
  • Partnerships :: We need to forge partnerships with community-based renewable energy project leaders and with communities interested in adopting renewable energy.
 

Future Functionality

Ultimately, it’s up to the community of users, but we’ve got some big ideas and an ambitious feature set and roadmap outlined in our PRD. We see the following opportunities (which we’ve also listed in the PRD):

  • a points system for contributing like on OpenIDEO, or points for upvotes like on Stack Exchange sites
  • could be used as part of the system that tracks the progress of the project and the delivery of the rewards themselves
  • could even become its own social network: a LinkedIn for humanitarian and voluntary work
  • could link people together that could help each other by profiling its users, what they need and what they can give (like FounderDating.com)


 

How do we evaluate our idea?

Comparative Analysis

We conducted inexhaustive research on other existing efforts in the space and came across a detailed guide written about renewable energy incentives in Germany. The audience of this guide appears to be investors, policy analysts, and/or businesses in the energy industry, not community-based project leaders. As a result, the content is not optimized for our audience, nor is it presented in an accessible way. Our guide might be able to make use of some of the research in this guide.
 

User Feedback

Our initial user feedback yielded two primary takeaways:

  • This tool has real potential, and is a unique solution because it offers a different kind of value proposition: understand how to motivate others.
  • The original prototype was confusing. Users didn’t understand how to use it. (To address this issue, we added instructions to the printable worksheet and re-designed the interactive portion.)


Since getting this user feedback, we’ve re-designed the interface and doubled down on clarifying the knowledge it is intended to communicate.
 

Success and Potential Challenges

Success can be measured in many ways, and we want to make sure that we look at not only the success of our users, but also at the success of the tool.

The primary success is when:
 

  • ...a community uses the guide and manages to implement incentives that motivate the community to adopt renewable energy.
  • ...a renewable energy project leader is inspired by the guide to implement incentives they may not have otherwise thought of when designing a community-based project.


Renewable adoption also depends on people knowing about renewable energy, and therefore there is a need to communicate about it. A secondary goal is therefore when:
 

  • ...the Motivations Interactive Guide makes people talk about renewable energy.


To make this a tool that is usable in the long-term, the tool needs to evolve with the needs and maturity of the community. In that sense we also say that we are successful when:
 

  • ...the guide itself become a viable product and therefore can continue to live on and evolve
  • ...the content of the guide increases in quantity and quality through curated user input.


Potential challenges are
 

  • ...getting communities to use the guide.
  • ...proving that the renewable energy adoption rate for communities will improve when using the guide as decision support for incentives.
  • ...designing a guide that can cater to diverse communities (including translation).
  • ...making the guide viable in the long-term.



Note: In the PDF attached above, we’ve shared the old version of our idea to highlight our iterative process. 


 

What community does this idea benefit and who are the main players?

This idea will benefit all kinds of communities. One thing that stays the same across the diverse communities that will adopt renewables is human psychology. Since knowledge about psychology is the core of our idea, we believe that our idea addresses a need in every community. We’ll know more once we’ve tested it in a broad array of communities. The main players are the people tasked with their community's renewable energy project. They will benefit from using this tool during the planning/design phase of their project. [Updated 7 Feb 2015]

How does your idea specifically help your community rapidly transition to renewables?

It equips change agents and community leaders with a deeper understanding of how motivation works, teaching them to assemble a wider range of motivations for their communities to adopt renewables. [Updated 4 Feb 2015]

What early, lightweight experiment can you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

Ask friends and RE enthusiasts to imagine planning a community-based RE project with the help of our tool. [Updated 4 Feb 2015]

What skills, input or guidance are you keen to connect with from the OpenIDEO community to help you build out or refine your idea further?

We want to partner with RE project leaders to get their feedback on our idea. [Updated 7 Feb 2015]

Please indicate which type of energy is most relevant to this post:

  • My post doesn't mention a specific type of energy

This idea emerged from:

  • A Group Brainstorm

73 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Dear evaluators, just now I edited this post by cutting out all the old stuff and pasting in the PDF linked above. No content has been altered since the end of the Refinement phase. The post is just a bit more readable know.

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Awesome idea Nathan! Really pertinent to this challenge!
Synthesizing this information for groups who are marketing RE is a great idea. There seems to be much work going on in the field of behavioral psychology and energy at the moment. Here are some links with interesting insights. Maybe they can help as you develop the guide?

Seems that Social factors are very important!
http://environment.yale.edu/news/article/why-solar-adoption-can-be-contagious
http://e360.yale.edu/feature/using_peer_pressure_as_a_tool__to_promote_greener_choices/2141/
Are you familiar with the studies on hotel guests and towel use? Seems to also support the importance of Social factors in environmental behavior change.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00224545.2013.855623#.VM_hyCjuu70

Understanding the value of energy in tangible terms is important. – Financial motivation. (I really like this one. For me energy units are abstract and invisible.) http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/01/29/americans-are-this-close-to-finally-understanding-their-electricity-bills/ “A variety of studies in the growing field of behavioral studies of energy use hint at the answer. They suggest you must not only provide people with real time information (ie; smart meters) about their electricity use in the home, but also show how that translates into dollars and cents.”

Other cool stuff:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/01/22/the-next-energy-revolution-wont-be-in-wind-or-solar-it-will-be-in-our-brains/
Behavior Energy and Climate Change Conference
http://beccconference.org/

Excited to hear what feedback you get from potential users!

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Wow, thanks Bettina! What a wealth of resources!!!

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Sure! I am learning loads from reading posts/links on this challenge, as well as doing some googling. I am really interested in behavior change research and it's applications. Happy to share!

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

Dear Bettina, so nice to see you here! Yes tons of useful resources! I just came up with an app that is very simple and visual. Let me explain it to you here:

This is how the proposed app works: a user can come to our app for either submitting their incentives or browsing our incentives Before-After Pictures/Visual juxtaposition. These before-after contrasts will include social, economic, environmental and even emotional differences before and after we install RE: such as the differences of the utilities bill we will get in 3 years, the natural landscape in 10 years, residents' mood, and a rural area's development. Before a user is taken into browsing these simple before-after picture pairs, he or she will answer one simple question:

How do you Feel about RE?
Options range from: resistant, skeptical, ignorant/neutral, interested, excited..


The user can choose to browse our before-after pic pairs as much as he/she wants. When he/she ends the browsing, the user will be asked to answer this question again. And this app will encourage the user to research RE in his community, and then submit his (community's) RE before-after pic pairs with simple but powerful descriptions. So it is going to be open-source and engaging.

Yet there may be a problem: will it simplify the incentives data? It is simple so users would not mind using and reading it. Yet it may greatly simplify the incentives and fail to integrate all different factors into a case. But if we going to put the whole cases up on an app, it may intimidate or bore some readers. If we can going to set up a simple platform for RE users to submit their incentives, it may be interesting but it will be hard to attract people who are not originally interested in RE... What do you think?!

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Shuting.
I think an App is a good idea as it will make this Guide widely available. Using simple visual information is a great idea. I am confused though about who the intended user is for the App you are describing.
My understanding of the Guide was to help Change Agents in their work to create new products and marketing campaigns, to help them influence uptake of RE by customers by compiling a list of customer motivations, which can in turn be used to create incentives for folk to switch to RE. Are you also proposing that the Guide is for RE customers themselves? In what way will they use it and why? (apologies if I misunderstood what you are proposing above or in the app..... looking forward to learning more... Are you thinking of a variety of target groups as users for the Guide?)

I love the spirit of the graphics above. Will you continue to prototype this as well?

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

Hello Bettina,

Great question and point of view. This app idea was intended to motivate anyone to know and love RE, which is different from what this project intends to do - to give community incentives guidance to especially community leaders. Yes so this app does not meet that requirement. We have decided not to consider it at all. Your understanding is definitely correct. Later in our meeting, we talked about it and decided to go with the original plan, which is help change agents plan better with their RE movement.

So what later came up is Passion Planner again. We want to build a Passion Planner for RE leaders! Not only will we incorporate different factors as categories, but this planner has a timeline. This idea is inspired by this:

http://www.passionplanner.com/

To make more, better, personal incentives, maybe it will be helpful to set up this "if this, then, that" gadget within the planner too. What do you think?

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Sounds interesting. Will this be digital and on paper? Looking forward to seeing some mock ups to better understand this tool!

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

Hello Bettina, thats what we were discussing. Now Patrik designed an interactive model and we all look forward to making this digital since it may be handy to use that way!

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Nathan, Shuting and Team,
Awesome updates and great presentation guys! This is exciting!
I love the Products Requirement Document as a planning tool.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thanks, Bettina. It's kind of you to say so. I'm proud of everyone's work. Hopefully we've got a prototype that RE project leaders can partner with us to test. If you know any, please put them in contact with me. Thanks again for your encouragement along the way!

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Great refinements, guys! Really like that you've sought feedback and iterated around it. Keep that approach up as you continue to develop this exciting initiative further.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thanks, Meena! We're hoping to partner with RE project leaders to get feedback and further refine this idea.

Photo of Andreas Karelas
Team

Great idea Nathan! I wonder how I might be able to use this tool with the communities we work with. Any suggestions? Check out our campaign page and let me know at https://openideo.com/challenge/renewable-energy/refinement/a-revolving-fund-for-solar-energy

Thanks!
Andreas

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Andreas, I've got a few ideas off the top of my head—which I'll share on your post—more than anything, I'd be interested in partnering with you. We need continual user feedback from RE project leaders like you as we continue iterating our design. Would you be interested in testing our tool?

Photo of Jason Rissman
Team

Hi Nathan,
We've been enjoying your prototypes and the evolution of your idea. Nice work! We hope you're able to identify some potential users and see how thinking about their needs might impact your design. It'd be fantastic to show them your prototypes and hear their feedback. Keep going!
Jason

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hi Jason,

Thank you for the support! ShuTing and I are both attending the event in San Francisco tonight and are going to show the prototype to other OpenIDEOtors to gather up some feedback before and after the event. We will post an update by the end of the week with the results of our survey and hopefully our new and improved prototype. Again, thank you for the support!

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

Thank you for your support Jason. We are also working on an interactive prototype of the guide where we also will incorporate feedback from user testing.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Jason, thanks for encouraging us to get some user feedback. We've done so, although we hope to do more in the coming months, once we identify partners who are RE project leaders.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Wow, major revision is complete! Many, many thanks to Natalie, Nay, Patrik, and ShuTing for collaborating with me to make this idea so much better for the leaders we're seeking to assist!

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Not sure if it's been discussed here already – but what format do you imagine this will take? When you say 'brochure' – do you mean a printed one? Might there also be a digital version or associated website given our focus on 'rapidly' helping folks convert to renewables? I guess more of this might become clear as you develop your User Experience Map and think about how different kinds of users will access, digest, disseminate and use this info. We're excited to see where things head...

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Good prodding, Meena. Yes, with a billion smartphone users worldwide, a mobile website might be a faster way to share this information than a printed trifold brochure.

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

Hello Meena, thanks for the question. I actually just drew a rough UX map for an RE Incentives app and look forward to getting feedbacks from teammates.

This is how the proposed app works: a user can come to our app for either submitting their incentives or browsing our incentives Before-After Pictures/Visual juxtaposition. These before-after contrasts will include social, economic, environmental and even emotional differences before and after we install RE: such as the differences of the utilities bill we will get in 3 years, the natural landscape in 10 years, residents' mood, and a rural area's development. Before a user is taken into browsing these simple before-after picture pairs, he or she will answer one simple question:

How do you Feel about RE?
Options range from: resistant, skeptical, ignorant/neutral, interested, excited..


The user can choose to browse our before-after pic pairs as much as he/she wants. When he/she ends the browsing, the user will be asked to answer this question again. And this app will encourage the user to research RE in his community, and then submit his (community's) RE before-after pic pairs with simple but powerful descriptions. So it is going to be open-source and engaging. This is very rough and needs work. Look forward to your feedback.

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Sounds like you're all doing lots of great thinking here! As you refine further and finalise decisions as a team, be sure to update your Summary section (text above the image gallery) by the time that our Refinement phase closes – to encapsulate what your idea actually entails briefly and clearly.

Here's a template if you need some help, though feel free to come up with your own clarifying sentence structure.

Our idea is a_________________ [campaign/app/service/program/online platform/toolkit/social enterprise/etc.] that tackles the problem of _____________[the issue being addressed ] by __________[what your idea looks like in practice].

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Meena, we've crafted an updated summary and the team really appreciate its focus. Great MadLib.

Photo of Meena Kadri
Team

Nice one. Really feels like a much stronger lead in to the idea for newcomers here!

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hey Nathan,

Can we post the slack and GoogleDoc links here so that if OpenIDEOtors want to participate on those they can as well. Thank you! :)

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

I'd love to bring more great minds on board, but with the limited time left in this phase, let's keep our team where it is. However, I'm checking this comments section regularly—as are several of our team—so we'll be able to benefit from others' insights posted here. When we move forward into the Impact stage of this challenge, I'd like to revisit your idea of growing the team.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

As I noted above, one need this idea has is for Graphic Design expertise. (This project is an information design project.) I've reached out to the Graphic Design community on Stack Exchange for input on designing the guide.

http://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/46313/design-problem-creating-a-guide-to-incentives

Photo of Nathan Gaydhani
Team

Hi Nathan, as a graphic and information designer I can help draft the guide in the most organised and simple way. Let me know if you still need help on this.

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hi Nathan,

We'd love to have you on the team! we were talking about the need for a designer :) can you send me your email address and I will add you to the google drive and the slack? We look forward to collaborating with you!

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

Excited to see where this collaboration goes! Thanks for offering your expertise, Nathan.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Yes! Welcome aboard, Nathan!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congratulations on making it to the Renewable Energy Challenge Refinement list, Nathan! We love the originality and passion behind your idea. It has been a powerful force in bringing together members of the OpenIDEO community and clearly strikes a chord with how to rapidly transition to renewables. The psychology focus is unique and we think has a lot of potential in affecting peoples’ energy decisions. The learnings from this project will have the ability to go on and affect many other ideas down the road, and we’re inspired by that ripple effect.

Looking ahead to the next 12 days of Refinement our team – along with the 11th Hour Project and the advisory panel – has a few questions that may help move your idea forward. We’re loving your rough prototype. Have you had the chance to put it in front of anyone yet? If not, this week is the perfect time. Since this guide is intended for such a wide range of communities, the greater the variety of people you’re able to get it in front of the better. With a motivated team involved, we’re excited about the amount of feedback you’ll all be able to synthesize in the upcoming week. And we can’t wait to see the iterations and provocations that come about as a result! Since you all are keeping in touch outside of OpenIDEO, just be sure to keep you idea updated.

We can’t wait to see this idea continue to develop. Check out more tips for Refinement on our blog: http://bit.ly/oi-refine and http://ideo.pn/rr-refinetips

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thanks!!!

User testing will be a big part of our Refinement phase.

It sounds like the unique value this idea brings to the project is guiding other innovators to ground their ideas in psychology. Ultimately, transitioning to renewables is about behavior change, so an understanding of *how* people change behavior will help other designers creating renewable energy solutions. Is that a fair interpretation of your feedback?

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

Can't wait for the user testing. The psychology angle is a unique one, and we'd love to see how focusing on that element could specifically lead to behavior change that would inspire a rapid transition to renewables. A lot to tackle, but I think you'll gain information from user testing that will get you closer to discovering how to do that.

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hey Nathan!

Do you think you could post a link to the video from the Stanford professor here? I thought that video was super interesting and helpful! Thank you!

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

Here is the link to the video http://bcove.me/ub9t0yfv

Photo of Oriol Segarra
Team

Great video! Thanks for sharing!

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thanks for the link, Patrik!

Photo of Laurie Shults
Team

The diversity of communities was mentioned previously. Because of that, it might be helpful to think about different ways individuals and communities consume information and in turn are motivated. I would think different motivations would resonate more strongly with different individuals and different communities, and at different times. An interactive matrix might help users/communities more easily access the motivations/incentives most immediately relevant and applicable to that user.

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

I love that you include "emotional" in the incentives :) We studied how emotion can become political, social and economic power back in grad school. Different from traditional performance studies, our emotion studies focused on how emotion, money and politics are dynamically inter-influencing each other. For example, money can buy emotion and emotion leads to political opinion (public speaking tactics or racism propaganda especially).

What if we think about the inter-active nature of all the elements you mention? How will that change our way to define and present incentives? I am just curious! I look forward to more updates from this interesting idea! :)

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thank you, Shuting. How would you think about the interactive nature of the different elements? Could you share an example of what you're imagining?

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

Hi Nathan thank you for asking the question! Back in school, I studied environmental photography. One of my favorite modern photographers is Edward Burtnysky. Instead of following the typical "atrocity aesthetics" which is to show environmental violence very bloodily, Burtynsky shows the BEAUTY of Pollution! How strange and disturbing is that! Yes this is the way Burtynsky shows people's environmental hypocrisy -- it makes people emotional:confused, shocked, angry, and yet in the end some will realize part of that bizarre beauty comes from their irresponsible environmental behavior. And then the audience gets educated about environmentalism- and they will change. This is Burtynsky's website in case you are interested:

http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/

I think examples of emotion, politics and money affecting each other are abundant. I love Jeff Buckley so I am gonna spend money building his CD. Jackson loves Lucy and Lucy loves nature, so Jackson may want to get environmental because of her ... I hope to share a few things I learn from maximizing the power of emotion in our environmental efforts:

1) emotion from intellectualism: like the Burtynsky photography, contrast, surprise and controversy is always great to make people start to feel and the think!

2) emotion from social pressure: ah my neighbor is celebrating their 5th anniversary with solar panel! And I would be excluded from that party if I still don't get anything on my rooftop.

3) emotion from other emotions: I dont want to see my favorite animal (either panda or penguin) dying so I am gonna fight for them and get green!

4) emotion from senses: let me touch, feel, smell, walk around the eco- houses and then I FEEL something new...

.... I am sure there are many other ways we generate emotions! Any ideas here?


Again, it is really a great idea to make incentive references guide for people! Imagine how nice it would be when people have confusion, and then refer to your guidebook. Do you have new ideas about how to organize these great ideas on incentives? For example, will it be case studies on different communities' characteristics, incentives and process of getting green? Or will you organize different incentives like a diagnose-prescription thing? Or a dictionary? Or following the main categories you listed in this initiative such as social and emotional? I am really excited about this project and see how invaluable it will be for all of us! Please keep me updated!

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Shuting, thanks for your detailed post! Very thought-provoking. I see what you mean: emotion can drive us to do all sorts of things. And many different things can produce emotion within us. We are in the process of prototyping the format the guide will take. You're welcome to contribute ideas by emailing me at nmlucy@gmail.com. (Teams are limited to 3 participants, or I'd add you right now!)

I'm loving Edward Burtynsky, by the way! Thanks for telling me about him.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Oops! Turns out I *can* add you!!! Just did. Let me know if you'd rather not be on the team ;)

Photo of Shuting Zeng
Team

I am glad you think they are thought-provoking Nathan! Yes I would like to join the team and help compile the incentives! I also got your email so let's keep talking here and on gmail too :) Isn't Burtynsky amazing? I am glad you like him :)

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

I feel that this idea could be focused by establishing its purpose: Who's it for? How will the user benefit? I've tried doing this, but now I'd like to be more concrete, and I'd like to ask for input. I'd like to frame the "job to be done" by this idea as a Point-of-View Madlib: "[USER] needs to [USER’S NEED] because [SURPRISING INSIGHT]". Check out how to come up with one here: http://dschool.stanford.edu/wp-content/themes/dschool/method-cards/point-of-view-madlib.pdf.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Honestly, my idea's weakness is that I don't know who its user is...

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

The user is the community I would say. "A community need to understand incentive structures/background/... because all communities are not the same"

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hey guys how would we feel about a GoogleVideo meet and chat. (It also has a whiteboard function so we can do this POV madlib.) I did it with another team and found it immensely useful to hash out details about the plan and refine it. I'd agree that the user is the community but as Patrik pointed out, this is a complex user. I also thought that we were making this as a reference guide for users like OpenIDEOers, who are trying to make a community based designs? If you guys are interested, I can make a Doodle to figure out when we can chat and then I can make a google invite to the chat :)

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Yes Natalie, great idea. Let's switch to email to schedule something. Email me at nmlucy@gmail.com and I'll contact both of you. (I already have Patrik's email but don't have permission to post it here.) Thanks for cross-pollinating collaboration techniques across teams!

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Hi Nathan, interesting post! Any chance you could find an image to go along with it? Images help grab attention and tell a story with higher impact. You should be able to use the Update Entry button on the right of your post and follow the instructions to add images from there. We know occasionally people have issues uploading images so let us know by hitting the Feedback button at the bottom of most pages of our site if you face any problems. Looking forward to seeing more of your inspiring insights on OpenIDEO.

And here's some tips on adding visual goodness to your idea: http://ideo.pn/vis-uals plus more on evolving your thought-starter: http://ideo.pn/oi-evolve

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

You're right, it does need something. I wish I'd had time to do more. I've given it a basic illustration now.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

And now a more advanced illustration. Hoorah!

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

Do you think we should also add the personal relationships, e.g., Community Member -> Community, Community Member -> Community Member, Community Member -> Itself?

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Patrik, who's the "Itself" here? Is this like my relationship to myself? An intra-personal relationship?

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Patrik, I added several new relationships in the scanned paper above. See if this addressed your suggestion.

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Nathan, the sketch looks amazing! Welcome back! Also, we were updating things in GoogleDocs for awhile but we have not updated much in awhile. Perhaps we can start coordinating this again. Here is a link to the google drive folder :)

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B_g4eIckUiYQc3ZDS3FtMzNwRGs&usp=drive_web

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Thanks, Natalie! So do we need to finalize something by the end of the Ideas phase in 32 hours?

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

And yes, I'm on board with coordinating again. What's a good next step?

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

With itself I mean when the incentive is clearly for your own gain, e.g., the simple incentive of getting lower energy bills when installing solar power, i.e., I do this for me, not for someone else. I think you have captured it.

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Team

Cheers!

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

Looking at my sketch and your makes me think we might need to do several matrices, as I believe different people and communities will think differently. Maybe they have an idea of incentive and want to find out if it fits for their project/community/etc, or maybe they need inspiration to find incentives, but have a good grip on other parts.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Good point. We can prototype several, then get them in front of users, and assess their feedback.

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

I wrote in my idea that this built on "I think we should focus on the concrete idea that Nathan built from this idea, instead of spreading thin on two fronts? What do you think? "

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Agreed. I like the idea of doing several matrices because there is a huge diversity of communities. On each one, we may also, want to leave part of the matrix blank so communities can fill in parts where they have different ideas?

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

I thought all team members could add to an idea, but I can find nowhere to add to it? I have a drawing I would like to add to the idea.

Photo of Natalie Lake
Team

Hi Patrik,

Yeah apparently team members cannot edit the post. We may want to exchange emails with Nathan. That is how ShuTing and I have been coordinating updates.

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

Sorry for the inconvenience - unfortunately only the original contributor can continue to edit the idea. It's something we're working on fixing! Exchanging emails is a good idea, just be sure to keep the OpenIDEO community updates with your discoveries and learnings.

Photo of Nathan Lucy
Team

Patrik, feel free to contact me at nathan@nathanlucy.com with updates!

Photo of Patrik Malmberg
Team

Excellent chart you uploaded. I have sent you my chart in an e-mail, and you can also find it on Google. They are similar, but we have used different axis, let's see how we can merge them together in a good way. I focused on project type and typ e of community as main selectors, with community maturity as a minor selector.

Photo of Oriol Segarra
Team

Hi Nathan! Thanks for this post, Natalie linked to me here! It will help a lot in developing further the idea we are trying to push forward along with Shuting and the other OpenIdeors!

Please give us your feedback in our ideas, you look like having experience in building non traditional business relationships between many different agent types!

https://openideo.com/challenge/renewable-energy/ideas/using-p2p-micro-finance-for-powering-up-renewable-energy-more-evenly

https://openideo.com/challenge/renewable-energy/ideas/clean-energy-angels