OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign up, Login or Learn more

Subsidies and the "True Cost of Food"

The divide between farmer and consumer is widened when government subsidies favor large corporate farm businesses and mono-cropping. The excess produced is shipped around the world, reducing the ability of small, unsubsidized farmers to survive.

Photo of DeletedUser
3 7

Written by DeletedUser

The divide between farmer and consumer is widened when government subsidies favor large corporate farm businesses and mono-cropping. The excess produced is shipped around the world, reducing the ability of small, unsubsidized farmers to survive.



The Sierra Club did a great video on the True Cost of Food. It covers a range of issues including factory farming, the loss of local farms, taxpayer subsidies and mono-cropping, and health.



http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7929268648728632575#



Large farms receive a disproportionate share of subsides, not the family farm. According to the Environmental Working Group, “Just ten percent of America's largest and richest farms collect almost three-fourths of federal farm subsidies – cash payments that too often promote harmful environmental practices.”



Particular crops such as corn, wheat, and cotton receive disproportionate relative to other more nutritious vegetables. From 1995 to 2009, corn received $73 billion, wheat $30 billion, and cotton $30 billion. This creates incentives to produce only the highly subsidized crops and mono-cropping. Some of these crops are further processed into non-perishable packaged food products, unrecognizable and disassociated from the origins as a vegetables. Turning corn into corn syrup is an example of this.



Here’s their database of subsidies: http://farm.ewg.org/





3 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

HI Juliet, This is a great video and you've concisely and clearly linked subsidies to food disassociation which is incontestable. Thank you.

View all comments