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Community Garden

Imagine a place where you can plant a fruit, vegetable, or flower garden that accommodates the modern lifestyle.

Photo of DeletedUser
5 2

Written by DeletedUser

A community garden is a public garden in which you choose a plot of a publicly owned garden, and plant anything you want. Then, you choose the maintenance plan that you want for your plot. This kind of community garden intends to address two main problems of gardening: lack of space and lack of time.

The level of maintenance that you want to choose depends on the time that you can dedicate to the garden. Three tiers of help can be provided:
1) "Farmer Frank": You are fully responsible for planting, maintaining, and harvesting. Ideal for people who have the time and passion to work on their gardens regularly.
2) "Weekend Warrior": You are responsible for planting and major maintenance work, likely every week or two. A public gardener checks on your garden every two days to water and care for the plants, and sends you a text/message if produce is ready to be harvested. Harvesting is your responsibility unless you are unavailable (e.g. out of town), in which you can arrange to have the public gardener do so for you. Ideal for those who enjoy gardening but will only have time on some weekends to tend to the garden.
3) "Busy Betsy": Public gardeners will take full responsibility for your garden, including planting, maintaining, and harvesting. You responsibility is to design the garden and commit to picking up the harvested produce in a timely manner.

The price for individuals using the garden would depend on their size of plot and the amount of help required. However, it is likely that because of economies of scale it will be cheaper than individual private gardens. Best practices of organic farming (e.g. availability of community compost) or best-in-class technology (e.g. drip irrigation) can be better implemented for a group of people. Moreover, the garden will be a place to socialize and trade harvested goods.

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Photo of Katlin Farrell

I have loved the idea of a community garden since I first heard of the idea, especially in more urban areas. I live in an apartment community myself and have no space for more than some herbs and potentially some shade loving plants (which is really limiting). In fact, if anyone in the Owings MIlls, Maryland area would like to start something like this, let me know!

Photo of Meena Kadri

Newspaper Personals Ad: I'm a Busy Betsy looking for a Farmer Frank!
[but don't tell my boyfriend, who's a Hard-working Hank]

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DeletedUser

Meena - Great idea. The community garden could also promote social matches :)

Photo of Vincent Cheng

Hi Salvador. I like where you are taking this to bring growing to people who may lack space or time. And, good thinking about tiering to account for different levels of needs (and with such catchy alliterative names) I think this could definitely ease the transition for more people to utilize community gardens. *Applause*

I also posted a related concept earlier for people or organizations that have space, but may lack the time, knowledge, or skills, called "Food Landscaping" ( http://bit.ly/hwYYVM ). Would love to hear if you had any thoughts on this.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Hi Vincent,

Thank you for the link. The concept that you posted is very interesting, and extremely relevant to mine.

I think both our concepts try to address the lack of time for gardening Yet, I believe the main difference that is that your concept focuses on people who already have a piece of land that can be turn into a garden. Whereas mine attempts to bring a social aspect into farming and also a space for people who do not own a piece of land to be turned into a garden.

Nonetheless, I think our concepts could build on each other. Maybe some of the private properties that you propose to be transformed into beautiful gardens by the "Food Landscapers" and used as community gardens.
 
Thanks for the feedback. It was great to see your idea. Please let me know what you think.

Cheers,
Salvador