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Taste and rate

Get social influence inside the house with 'Taste and rate'. Every time you taste new (healthy) food as a child you can add it at your 'taste collection' and indicate if you liked it. The more you collect and the more you like, the more points you get. With a certain amount of points they can get a free mysterious product at the supermarket. The height of ranking and amount of free mysterious products, will be compared with friends and stimulate to eat more varied, healthy and to taste more.

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Written by DeletedUser

This supermarket campaign will make eating for families and children feel like a challenging discover adventure like 'learning how to ride a bike'. Sometimes it is difficult but you always try it again, because you know you will finally be able to do it and every time you try it, you improve. As a child you also get the reward of rising in stature among other children.


Every time you taste new (healthy) food as a child you can add it at your taste collection and indicate if you liked it. The more you collect the more points you get. Every time children taste something that they did not like before, their rating also raises. The purpose of this is to stimulate parents to let children taste again, because children sometimes need to taste things up to 10 times before they like it. If they finally like it, they even get more points. Also your ranking raises when you eat something that not a lot of other children ate. With a certain amount of points they can get a free mysterious product at the supermarket. This product becomes more challenging overtime
The height of ranking and amount of free mysterious products, will be compared with friends and stimulate tasting.


Supermarkets have the power to reach families and make this campaign a rage. Children and parents will be in this way convinced to eat more varied, healthy and taste everything. The concept can be digital or physical and should be used together by parents and children, it is connected to real fresh food you buy at the supermarket.


"At this moment I am doing my (Design for interaction) graduation project about: encouraging families with young children (4-6) to eat frequently more varied. After doing literature research and context study of dutch families eating behaviour (with the use of cultural probes, let them self document, generative techniques, expert interviews and joining them for dinner) I found out that during dinner a lot of families eat unvaried and unhealthy, but also that they do not enjoy the dinner ritual because of the struggle at the table. While families find it important, therefore you need to focus on both parents and children for a solution. If parents will not enjoy varied cooking,children do not enjoy varied eating and the other way around. Therefore it is important for both that it becomes social, rewarding and intuitive. For parents the solution should be convenient and persuasive, for children joyful and explorative.
I want children and parents to enjoy together healthy varied eating at the dinner table. The next step of the project will be to develop the concept further and test it with families "

Age of kids. The solutions to changing kids’ eating behaviors will vary depending on their age. What works for a toddler won’t necessarily fly for a teenager, although we suspect some concepts might be appropriate for all ages—even adults! Which age bracket does your concept address (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Elementary (Kids) 5-10

Hurdles to success. Helping kids make smarter food choices comes with a variety of hurdles that have to be addressed in order for a design solution to be successful, which of these do you think that your Concept overcomes (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Expense and Convenience
  • Peer Pressure
  • Lack of Knowledge

Evaluation results

8 evaluations so far

1. Food Knowledge - To what extent is this concept teaching people about food knowledge?

It's teaching people a great deal about food knowledge - 12.5%

It's teaching people a moderate deal about food knowledge - 62.5%

It's teaching people a little about food knowledge - 25%

It's not focused on food knowledge - 0%

2. Cooking - Is this concept focused on getting people to cook?

It's all about getting people to cook - 0%

It's moderately about getting people to cook - 62.5%

It's getting people to cook a little - 12.5%

It's not focused on cooking at all - 25%

3. Originality - How original is this idea?

This idea is extremely original - 62.5%

This idea is somewhat original - 37.5%

This idea has some originality about it - 0%

I have seen this idea before - 0%

4. Scalability - How scalable is this idea across communities and geographies?

This idea can be scaled across many communities and places - 37.5%

This idea can be scaled but needs some work - 12.5%

This idea will take a fair bit of work to scale - 50%

This idea cannot scale at all - 0%

12 comments

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DeletedUser

I like this idea! Specifically, I think it does a very good job of addressing a core issue when it comes to healthy eating, which is developing a tendency to try new foods. And we know that kids do have quite a different palette than adults, and that they might not adapt to different foods initially, but developing a habit of being comfortable trying new foods might allow a palette to develop more quickly over time.

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I like how this is tackling the "my kids wont try new foods" problem, and I like the game/competition/reward elements.

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DeletedUser

Exactly, I think that food rating shouldn't be done afterwards. It should be established before. Eating healthy should give tyhe user a good score. Eating junk shouldn't. And I think that all participants here agree that eating vegetables and drinking milk should be well rewarded in points. A happy meal should generate a poor score. This wil help everyone, but especialy children to avoid nocive items. It's like the tobacco tax.

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DeletedUser

I think it'll be important with this idea to make sure that the system doesn't accidentally backfire and make kids avoid the foods that other kids didn't like, and also that the supermarkets don't just end up using it as market research to decide which products to get rid of.
I like the reward system, though, and the incentive to try something new.

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DeletedUser

What I also love about this idea is that it delivers knowledge in the real world (as opposed to other posts that try to deliver knowledge through virtual applications)
Again, it's a really great idea.

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DeletedUser

Very good idea, I love it!
I think it should be pushed more towards the gaming side, meaning that collected points will allow each child to a privilege (treat, access more options, purchase an ugrade etc...) This way, the child would be motivated to eat more healthy, (since his cup of milk could be worth 100 points but the candy could only give him 5 points...)

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DeletedUser

Great idea! Combining what kids like (surprises, presents, friendly competition) with their 'fear' of healthy food. Repetition also very important. Did you think about how physical activities increases how kids value the taste of food? When your body demands nutrition, food always tastes better! It might help kids to succeed better at winning points.
But kids also like to cheat at games. How now to make it such that it doesn't become too complicated with rules. The ideal would be if the first incentive to participate is the mysterious prize, but then the game takes over and keeps kids captivated and eager to try more interesting food types.
Good luck with this cool idea!

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DeletedUser

I like it, the supermarkets will be join this campaign, they impulse garbage products, if they change the route would be very helpull.

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DeletedUser

Going further along the lines of having kids rate the new foods, we should break it down into taste and texture. For example, I do not mind the taste of lima beans, but hate the texture, unless they are ground into pea soup. Having the chance to rate why they like or do not like something should appeal to just about everyone and thus extend the appeal to more than just smaller kids.

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DeletedUser

Now if the entire school had their "mystery food of the week" program, all the kids could compare notes. When the majority like the taste of UMMPA's they will request more of them.

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DeletedUser

Like the idea, but broccoli is broccoli. It does not even sound good! We might call the new food treats by different names to let kids go in open-minded to see if they like the "Mystery food for the week" before deciding that they hate it.

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DeletedUser

I really like that it encouraged kids to taste and receive positive input through higher ratings, etc.