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Shopping cart provokes healthier purchases

A multi compartment shopping cart, where the compartments represent a healthy balance of food, such as 50% of all food having to be fruit & vegetables. So families and kids automatically shop "the right way".

Photo of DeletedUser
39 160

Written by DeletedUser

It's based on a very cool experiment they did, which had great impact. Check it out here: http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s1690079.shtml?cat=504

Age of kids. The solutions to changing kids’ eating behaviors will vary depending on their age. What works for a toddler won’t necessarily fly for a teenager, although we suspect some concepts might be appropriate for all ages—even adults! Which age bracket does your concept address (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Elementary (Kids) 5-10
  • Middle school (Tweens) 11-13
  • High school (Teens) 14 -18
  • Young adults 18-21

Hurdles to success. Helping kids make smarter food choices comes with a variety of hurdles that have to be addressed in order for a design solution to be successful, which of these do you think that your Concept overcomes (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Expense and Convenience
  • Lack of Knowledge

Evaluation results

7 evaluations so far

1. Food Knowledge - To what extent is this concept teaching people about food knowledge?

It's teaching people a great deal about food knowledge - 14.3%

It's teaching people a moderate deal about food knowledge - 42.9%

It's teaching people a little about food knowledge - 42.9%

It's not focused on food knowledge - 0%

2. Cooking - Is this concept focused on getting people to cook?

It's all about getting people to cook - 14.3%

It's moderately about getting people to cook - 28.6%

It's getting people to cook a little - 42.9%

It's not focused on cooking at all - 14.3%

3. Originality - How original is this idea?

This idea is extremely original - 57.1%

This idea is somewhat original - 28.6%

This idea has some originality about it - 14.3%

I have seen this idea before - 0%

4. Scalability - How scalable is this idea across communities and geographies?

This idea can be scaled across many communities and places - 42.9%

This idea can be scaled but needs some work - 28.6%

This idea will take a fair bit of work to scale - 28.6%

This idea cannot scale at all - 0%

39 comments

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Photo of Chandra Shekhar

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Photo of Jeannie Llewellyn

I love this idea! Can we make it for adults, too? Ha ha! And a smaller shopping cart - for single adults or elderly

Photo of Christopher

Fantastic idea!

Photo of Jack Meakins

Great idea! Just might need a few more compartments in the shopping cart.

Photo of Shuting Zeng

Ok this really reminds me of an early IDEO design! A great design. An Asian show about children education had an episode, in which kids were asked to go to supermarket to do shopping and then cook for their parents! And yes how disproportionate their purchase had been :) Wish they could use your carts.

Photo of Eric Tucker

I like the visual aspect of the apportioned cart, but there are other things bought at the grocery store besides groceries.

Photo of Fei Xin

This idea is really interesting. As we know, parents eating habits will directly affect children how to choose healthy food. Therefore, a multi compartment shopping cart can provides "the right way" to teach people how to buy fresh fruit and vegetables. In order to have a healthy lifestyle, people should eat healthy foods everyday.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I love it! it has this elegant "Nudge" factor... why just educate kids, educate everyone!

Photo of Minh Tran

I just realized that the mass production of this cart would be costly and it would make it harder for food markets to want to spend the money. If it's possible I think it would be cool to have the same concept but it would be attachable to existing shopping carts on wither the left side or right side. Also that way the children would stay next to their parents. This way you use less platics and you save a lot of money on the wheels so it would cut costs.

Photo of Minh Tran

You know this is a great concept. I have seen shopping carts that have a little passenger seat with a TV in it. Instead they should spend 1/20 of that cost to have a little side tray that attaches to shopping carts that has your concept. So variety of foods can be put in portions.

Photo of An Old Friend

This would work for any age kid, but I can just picture young kids with a mini-sized version of this cart walking through the grocery aisle with their parents.

Someone submitted an inspiration to reserve the lower shelves for kid items. If we combine that idea, and the idea of a colored compartmental cart for different fruit group items, I think the grocery space would be a lot more kid-friendly. This would be a great start for forming a good shopping habit for fresh foods.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

When you do your groceries, you also shop for drinks, right?

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I see a great potential on this concept, however the flaws are around a realistic everyday shopping experience:

- To what extent are kids involved in the supermarket shopping scenario to learn from it? Aren't parents mostly relying on online shopping or possibly doing it on breaks without the kids going along with them?

- Where would tuna/bean cans be placed in the cart for example? Frozen ready veggie ready meals? Wouldn't shoppers consider their choices as 'healthy' when they can place them in the vegetable compartment even if they are not fresh products?

One way to tackle this could be by inspiring people with simple recipes while doing their shopping (e.g. on a small screen embedded on the cart) always based on fresh-seasonal products and possibly also on offer.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I just came across this article on an experiment from Wholefoods on a grocery cart, different concept but based on the idea of helping you make the right choices while shopping:
http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/29/whole-foods-experimenting-with-kinect-powered-shopping-carts/

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I love this idea! It focuses on behavior change instead of learning to change, which is great if we are targeting young kids. Most food psychology books state that we don't really make conscious choices on what or how much we eat; most it those choices, rather, are made by what we see visually. If we can adopt this shopping cart for kids, it will teach them the behavior of buying foods by food group, and the repitition of the action will create eventual behavioral change.

Photo of Demian Repucci

Good idea with a lot of potential! I think Teresa's comment below is interesting. Since food companies would probably lobby against it's use at typical markets, maybe this type of cart would simply target the stores that the food companies compete to get into such as Wal-Mart, Whole Foods and Trader Joes. Those stores can probably dictate terms more than others. Not to mention that it could reinforce each store's health conscious brand identity.
What if the cart could also scan the items that were going into it and then send information to the shoppers smart phone or iPad? Put in a chicken, some parsley and fava beans and the cart would then send a list of possible recipes that could be made with these ingredients. The shopper would then save the ones that were interesting and continue on, adding the other needed ingredients and building meals for the week. Sort of like a shopping list on the fly. The cart could also give nutritional information. Drop in some carrots and it could tell you about the vitamins it has, growing season, where the carrots were sourced from, best preparations, etc. Also, as it scans, the cart could keep a running tally of price, price per lb./g, total calorie content, etc. and give suggestions on how to nutritionally balance what is being bought. I guess I am thinking of the cart as health and nutrition translator and coach for the shopper.
Lots of fun directions to develop this.
Thanks for the concept!

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

This is a good match to the plate concept. Perhaps the categories should be more open, to address vegetarians or other sorts of food restrictions/preferences. One suggestion would be using other terminology, such as Proteins (which would encompass meat, eggs, fish, soy protein and other suitable substitutes).

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Great concept. I think in isolation this concept will not achieve what we are set out to achieve. However, this should definitely be an add on to some of the other proposed concepts.

Good stuff.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Ok, I know the “Built On This” time is over (I found out of the page today) but this idea came to my mind. Finally parents buy the food, let give them a glimpse of the future. What the cart should do is to portray in the front of it or the side of eat, in a little screen, how would a child of average age 10 will look like if it ate for 15 years the type of food that is inside the cart. Finally, the blow to your mind, when you get your ticket in the cashier, at the back of it, you will find printed the image of your virtual child that ate for the next 15 years exactly what you bought for that week.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Great idea. I am wondering if goverment and corporations are as concerned as they say or just as concerned as they should be. A cool way to implement this is to add some bonus for the buyer. Having a full veggie section gives you a discount on the overall expense of your grocerys. That way you add better food to your diet simply to get a reward.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

It would be great to have slogans on shopping carts added to motivate shoppers. Something from Michael Pollen perhaps: "Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly Plants."

Or what if you could set your cart to help you shop according to specific diet? The stores would benefit in drawing shoppers who are on a fad diet and at the same time the shoppers would get the extra help they may need. In addition to fad diets the cart could help with healthier choices.

I really like the idea of reminding people about wiser choices at time of purchase.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Cool idea! Keeping it simple and visual!

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

My daughter who is 3, only wants to go shopping with me if we go to the Trader Joe's that has mini-carts for her to be the shopper. She feels so proud pushing it through the aisles and filling it up. I agree that this concept would be perfect for this kind of mini kid shopping cart. 3 year olds love to categorize almost as much as they love feeling like they are in charge:).
I also know of some parents who bring their own mini shopping cart (purchased at any toy store) to grocery stores that don't have them. You could sell this version at a toy store. Could a grocery store possibly stop you from bringing it in? I doubt they would.
Combine this idea with the kid sized grocery store (or section of a grocery store) and my daughter would be in heaven, and taking ownership of her already pretty good eating habits.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I really like this idea. It's simple and may be just the nudge people need. However, I'm concerned about how it fits with the economics of a grocery store. A grocer like Whole Foods might use it, but the big chains likely make large margins on junk food, not to mention the advertising dollars / product placement throughout the store. Part of the reason why we eat the way we do, is because junk food providers spend way more $ on advertising than fresh food providers.

Maybe this could be sold as an insert, that a health-conscious shopper could buy, to use in any cart at any store. Bring your own bags, bring your own cart divider. If you want to get really fancy, people could design their own inserts based on their dietary goals.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

A nice idea, but what about dairy, fats and oils? Protein rich foods tend to be denser than fruit and veg so they need less space, whilst grains, breads etc, tend to be bulkier. The real challenge is not getting the right stuff into the trolley but making sure that the food is eaten when it reaches home.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

A nice idea, but what about dairy, fats and oils? Protein rich foods tend to be denser than fruit and veg so they need less space, whilst grains, breads etc, tend to be bulkier. The real challenge is not getting the right stuff into the trolley but making sure that the food is eaten when it reaches home.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

The great thing about this idea is that it should quite effectively help aid behavioural change. Most of the time people just need a small reminder to change their ways, but sometimes it's not present. I'll be interested to see if this works over a wider population of people.

Photo of Amy Bonsall

This is great. Maybe we could even work with supermarkets to color code stuff so that little kids could easily find the right "color" stuff to put into the carts. It could become a game in the supermarket.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Great idea... I can already picture the kids telling the parents off as they try to put a packet of buiscuits in the trolley!

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Love the idea but I'd find it intrusive, as if I put some crisps in the wrong box I'd get a dodgy look at the counter.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I like how visual and simple this is. This could be implemented right now.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I like the visual/spatial/tactile process of filling the cart, plate, etc.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

wow! I think this is a great idea because it recognizes the large influence parent's choices have in shaping kid's behaviors over time. By promoting healthier eating at home, I would expect kids to become familiar (and developed less resistance) to all food groups. It starts at home, kids tend to imitate what adults do, that's how they learn pretty much everything.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

How about a more universally accepted version (that will work for every healthy diet), where there is 3/4 of a cart for fresh produce, and just 1/4 for everything else?

Because, for example, I don't eat grains or animal products, and I would definitely not want to promote the idea to kids that they are supposed to, since they are not a necessity for health.

The overall idea is kind of neat though. Giving people a visual sense of how much whole, fresh foods they might want to get is a good way to go about it. Though I imagine that you might have some conflicts of interest with the stores, since they tend to earn more money on the heavily processed foods, and get incentives from corporations to have high profile product placements for junk food, and they might not want to jeopardize their profit margins just to keep people healthy.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Great idea.

Have a look at Nicola's final design, similar to yours except being a plate.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_nuIO6IH8heA/SKhBUKBM5EI/AAAAAAAAAO0/CWm6bZNfjQE/s1600-h/DSCF8384.JPG

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

This is cool. The first thing that came to mind was the nutritional pyramid we all love from grade school. Somehow that idea could inspire the look of the cart. Plus each section could have a handle and be removed for easy shopping.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I think this a great idea. It would not only work for children but for adults as well. Could we also assigned a section of unhealthy food section on the trolley? Imagine standing next to someone at the check out with a trolley full of junk and unhealthy foods. What would the person next to you think? And would you want to be seen as an healthy person by a shopping trolley full of items in the junk food section of your trolley.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

Great idea! Would be cool if a handheld device was added in which kids could use it to take pictures of " qr codes" and learn more about foods they are putting in cart!

Photo of Vincent Cheng

This is great! Visual Feedback/Nudging integrated into people's regular grocery shopping routine. In addition to a brand new multi-compartment cart, perhaps a cheaper compartment kit could be sold/distributed to grocery stores, enabling them to retrofit their existing carts (more palatable than the >$100/new cart price tag). What other things could be done to encourage grocery stores to adopt and scale this idea? For "Whole Foods", it might fit with the brand/reputation they are trying to convey. How about other grocery stores?