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Introducing the No-Bake Sale! A "farmer's market" fundaiser run by the whole school

Combine healthy locally-grown food with education and business that's good for the community, and you might get a Farmer's Market style table, stand, or even store that sells healthy produce and similar things that kids and teachers and parents have grown, collected, and made in classrooms and schoolyards.

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The goal of a solution is to be sustainable, so it should bring in resources as well as spending them. And a school farmer's market, no-bake sale type event or store will indeed bring in resources by providing something that people spend money on anyway, while being the incentive for kids, parents, and teachers to collaborate on finding practical ways to teach kids about growing their own healthy, whole, organic food, wherever they happen to live. Growing the food can be integrated into pretty much any curriculum and classroom, since food is major part of social studies and science, and can be used to study math, literature, and even languages. And kids can learn about money and the economy by helping run the school farmer's market store, stand, or No-Bake Sale table.


A website could be set up to help schools and communities organize these programs, with ideas being exchanged, sample curriculum available, and a downloadable No-Bake Sale kit with predesigned posters, sample press releases, and other useful tools for holding a successful event or starting a stand or store.


For an idea of what schools could sell, imagine an urban classroom where the class is growing things like fresh sprouts to make into sprout mixes, wheatgrass for juicing or cleaning your teeth, and vegetable and herb seedlings, and occasionally makes and creatively packages simple, healthy trail mixes to sell, using bulk ingredients from a health food store, or building and using a bicycle powered blender to make green smoothies! And then imagine that schools with more land building gardens, fruit tree groves, and greenhouses to grow lots of produce and seedlings to sell, as we as using the produce to make simple, healthy snacks and other food (salads, party platters, pickles, dried fruit and veggie mixes, etc.) to sell to students, parents, teachers, and the community at large. And more rural schools can even harvest wild foods, from mushrooms, to wild berries, to maple syrup to sell!


And finally imagine that schools eventually start partnering up with, or even starting up their own, restaurants, grocery stores, and other businesses to sell their produce and healthy creations. So that schools become not just a place for kids to learn about things in books and on chalkboards and computers, but also a place that allows kids to actively contribute to the health of their community, while enjoying themselves, and getting hands on experience with something that everyone needs to know, how to eat exceptionally well.

Age of kids. The solutions to changing kids’ eating behaviors will vary depending on their age. What works for a toddler won’t necessarily fly for a teenager, although we suspect some concepts might be appropriate for all ages—even adults! Which age bracket does your concept address (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Pre-school (Tots) 2-4
  • Elementary (Kids) 5-10
  • Middle school (Tweens) 11-13
  • High school (Teens) 14 -18
  • Young adults 18-21

Hurdles to success. Helping kids make smarter food choices comes with a variety of hurdles that have to be addressed in order for a design solution to be successful, which of these do you think that your Concept overcomes (tick all relevant boxes)?

  • Expense and Convenience
  • Peer Pressure
  • Lack of Knowledge

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DeletedUser

What a good idea!

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DeletedUser

It's usually not a great idea to define yourself in opposition to something, since it's literally a negative connotation, and because it poorly frames what you ARE, but in this case, it seemed reasonable and amusingly descriptive. :-)

Eventually, I imagine that people would have more positive names for these things, such as "young farmer's market" or school market or (name of school) fresh market, or something. But starting off small, and playing on the ever-popular, but not at all health-promoting bake sale concept seems like it could be a real winner.

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DeletedUser

One of the best ways to develop a brand is to say what you're not -- in this case a non-bake sale says WAY more than a au-naturale sale. Awesome!

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DeletedUser

Thanks thanks! :-)
I'm thinking of doing this for my own project, as a fundraiser. Though we already have some schools that have a booth at the Farmer's Market here, which is awesome!

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DeletedUser

A great plan!

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DeletedUser

A great plan!