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Jamie Oliver won the TED Prize wish last year. His wish was to create a Food Revolution in America, to change the way kids eat by teaching them how to cook and what fresh food can do for them. This is all in the effort to help fight to obesity, one of the largest health issues in the United States. OpenIDEO is all about getting a broader group of people to solve some of the world’s most difficult challenges, and this seemed like a great one to kick off with. Click on the active phase in the timeline above to participate.

If you have seen Jamie’s Food Revolution program, you may have seen the episode where he’s testing kids in a kindergarten to see if they know where food comes from. The children couldn’t identify a tomato. This highlighted a real issue of fresh food, the lack of knowledge, and how easy it could be to develop cooking skills for kids of all ages and skills. The kick-off OpenIDEO challenge is to explore, how we might raise kid’s awareness of the benefits of fresh food so they can make better choices. Better choices about the food they eat, the skills to cook it, and the knowledge to make these choices.


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Photo of roney patil

http://technewsreviews.strikingly.com/blog/skype-push-to-talk

Photo of roney patil

http://travisnhylk.dsiblogger.com/7728940/the-2-minute-rule-for-windows-and-mac-keyboard
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http://click-here-now36924.blogocial.com/Not-known-Facts-About-microsoft-keyboard-for-mac-17404504
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http://clickoverhere36491.tinyblogging.com/5-Simple-Statements-About-mac-keyboard-for-windows-10-Explained-16103419

Photo of roney patil

http://waylonkjezt.jiliblog.com/16146280/5-essential-elements-for-windows-r-on-mac
http://checkoverhere93691.blog2learn.com/16042647/examine-this-report-on-press-to-talk
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http://go-right-here38269.blog5.net/16331623/short-key-for-windows-10-no-further-a-mystery
http://check-here31851.fitnell.com/16197188/mac-keyboard-for-windows-10-an-overview
http://clickoverherenow63466.full-design.com/5-Essential-Elements-For-push-to-talk-computer-microphone-17232507
http://click-this-site42839.xzblogs.com/7951324/mac-keyboard-for-windows-10-an-overview
http://clickthisoverherenow03698.dbblog.net/7904112/5-tips-about-windows-mac-keyboard-you-can-use-today
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http://clickthissite38257.ezblogz.com/8104435/the-basic-principles-of-keyboard-text-shortcuts
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http://zionaegfe.free-blogz.com/7041344/how-much-you-need-to-expect-you-ll-pay-for-a-good-settings-shortcut
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http://visit-here38413.blogpostie.com/2131985/the-2-minute-rule-for-press-buttons-and-talk
http://devinokctj.blogzag.com/6644961/mac-keyboard-for-windows-10-an-overview
http://cristianfwmzm.designi1.com/2079641/the-greatest-guide-to-windows-key-r
http://beaurdmve.blogstival.com/2113535/getting-my-text-message-short-cuts-to-work
http://go-here53962.articlesblogger.com/2108290/the-basic-principles-of-keyboard-text-shortcuts

Photo of roney patil

http://reidwxlp61200.ka-blogs.com/7762613/considerations-to-know-about-bloons-monkey-city-hacks
http://emilianonsqk40739.timeblog.net/8013119/facts-about-bloons-supermonkey-2-revealed
http://arthurltrk75177.acidblog.net/8155134/a-review-of-ballon-monkey-city
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http://miloahza52631.collectblogs.com/8199583/5-simple-techniques-for-monkey-balloon-popper
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http://claytoneykv87434.blogzag.com/6607560/the-fact-about-bloons-monkey-city-hacked-arcadeprehacks-that-no-one-is-suggesting
http://gunnerpkdy06284.imblogs.net/6690735/bsm2-hacked-things-to-know-before-you-buy
http://sethtkub22986.blogstival.com/2081872/the-2-minute-rule-for-supermonkey2
http://arthurrzyp91223.designi1.com/2048690/a-secret-weapon-for-super-monkey-unblocked
http://edwinzybg23197.look4blog.com/6559768/the-ultimate-guide-to-bloons-2-ninja-kiwi
http://griffinrtqg77776.educationalimpactblog.com/2051947/the-smart-trick-of-bloons-super-monkey-2-cheats-that-no-one-is-discussing
http://juliusdvhq25814.ivasdesign.com/2051560/a-review-of-ballon-monkey-city
http://louisavfo87648.onesmablog.com/Not-known-Details-About-bsm-2-17753840
http://keeganvvhf30875.link4blogs.com/2083434/the-5-second-trick-for-bsm2-hacked
http://martinraat95284.mybloglicious.com/2083214/rumored-buzz-on-super-balloon-monkeys
http://cashcljy59753.post-blogs.com/2048733/a-review-of-ballon-monkey-city
http://ricardojczi76062.review-blogger.com/1996935/considerations-to-know-about-bloons-monkey-city-hacks
http://jaspermtqj73961.uzblog.net/not-known-details-about-bloons-monkey-city-online-6508884
http://jasperprht09752.free-blogz.com/7004134/the-definitive-guide-to-balloons-game-monkey
http://riveritjy20876.total-blog.com/rumored-buzz-on-super-balloon-monkeys-13867190

Photo of roney patil

http://paxtonjbls77733.thezenweb.com/A-Secret-Weapon-For-bloons-super-monkey-1-17949718
http://simoniizf20875.ampblogs.com/A-Secret-Weapon-For-super-monkey-unblocked-18084983
http://brooksamze02107.pointblog.net/5-Easy-Facts-About-bloons-super-monkey-Described-16820316
http://lanezrdm03692.pages10.com/Not-known-Factual-Statements-About-btd-super-monkey-17407611
http://israelofey06282.ampedpages.com/monkey-popping-balloons-An-Overview-17393969
http://israelfueo75420.blogocial.com/Considerations-To-Know-About-supermonkey-game-17361247
http://dallasphvf70369.mpeblog.com/2106153/the-smart-trick-of-bloons-super-monkey-2-cheats-that-no-one-is-discussing
http://gregoryjvys84061.ezblogz.com/8063892/facts-about-supermonkey-game-revealed
http://sethonds99987.arwebo.com/2074631/everything-about-bloons-super-monkey-2-hacked
http://erickmlwe75201.bluxeblog.com/7997718/a-review-of-super-monkey-balloon-pop
http://rafaelgpvw79247.articlesblogger.com/2076978/5-tips-about-monkey-and-balloon-games-you-can-use-today
http://louiswukt88866.designertoblog.com/8008067/rumored-buzz-on-balloon-monkey-city-hacked
http://israelextx32951.blogs-service.com/7999326/not-known-details-about-bloons-monkey-city-online
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http://andrewmtj65224.blogprodesign.com/2097853/the-2-minute-rule-for-bloons-super-monkey-hacked
http://dantehjvr73951.blogpostie.com/2100242/the-definitive-guide-to-balloons-game-monkey
http://keeganmbis38517.fitnell.com/16152200/5-simple-statements-about-balloon-super-monkey-2-explained
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http://marcojnew80129.blog5.net/16286433/the-basic-principles-of-bloons-super-monkey-2-hack
http://dominickkwws13323.dbblog.net/7864626/considerations-to-know-about-bloons-monkey-2
http://ericknuqf40951.qowap.com/16344574/the-smart-trick-of-bloons-super-monkey-2-cheats-that-no-one-is-discussing
http://raymondzrem39596.blog2learn.com/15998360/not-known-details-about-bsm-2
http://lanegten03693.jiliblog.com/16101952/fascination-about-bloons-super-monkey-2-guide
http://brooksewjt59471.tinyblogging.com/5-Simple-Statements-About-balloon-super-monkey-2-Explained-16060336
http://cesarfcvm90632.full-design.com/A-Secret-Weapon-For-bloons-super-monkey-1-17191118
http://raymonddugq25814.bloguetechno.com/Not-known-Factual-Statements-About-btd-super-monkey-15986967
http://elliotgqph39517.blogolize.com/bsm2-hacked-Things-To-Know-Before-You-Buy-17421089
http://andresbhgo63962.dsiblogger.com/7688330/details-fiction-and-super-monkey-balloon-pop
http://dominickmkyi29482.getblogs.net/8029105/the-greatest-guide-to-monkey-balloon-games

Photo of roney patil

http://hectorgnld04792.blog2learn.com/16017451/top-pc-part-picerk-secrets
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http://jaidenflkh79123.look4blog.com/6575814/the-basic-principles-of-define-part
http://devinlles11692.blogstival.com/2095274/how-custom-gaming-pc-parts-can-save-you-time-stress-and-money
http://johnathanbezd02998.designi1.com/2061878/the-fact-about-pc-building-help-that-no-one-is-suggesting
http://fernandovvin89729.imblogs.net/6706957/an-unbiased-view-of-free-gaming-pc-parts
http://travisywel14733.educationalimpactblog.com/2065172/how-custom-gaming-pc-parts-can-save-you-time-stress-and-money
http://rowanmsrk41733.ivasdesign.com/2064835/the-smart-trick-of-build-your-own-gaming-computer-guide-that-nobody-is-discussing
http://jaspervdfz06284.link4blogs.com/2096774/cpu-building-no-further-a-mystery
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http://elliotqroi30628.review-blogger.com/2009927/considerations-to-know-about-newegg-pc-configurator
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http://ricardoirvi62962.canariblogs.com/build-my-own-pc-guide-options-6951515
http://angelowywp62951.blogdon.net/computer-build-checker-secrets-8396166
http://andyohzo26059.amoblog.com/new-step-by-step-map-for-assembled-desktop-computer-10855999
http://knoxsyul76296.total-blog.com/not-known-factual-statements-about-pc-custom-build-13876345

Photo of roney patil

http://messiahlrtr25791.pages10.com/The-Single-Best-Strategy-To-Use-For-pc-17424974
http://landenvjhb84948.ampblogs.com/building-pc-An-Overview-18102456
http://devinxqfs23206.blogocial.com/The-Fact-About-pc-building-help-That-No-One-Is-Suggesting-17378857
http://donovanubaz29506.blogolize.com/build-a-computer-online-simulator-Secrets-17438742
http://sethntrj40739.onesmablog.com/The-Definitive-Guide-to-build-pc-checklist-17771331
http://judahxgtz75173.bloguetechno.com/A-Simple-Key-For-pcbuilder-website-Unveiled-16003439
http://dallasffbd78644.full-design.com/build-my-own-pc-guide-Options-17208632
http://archermymf67763.blog5.net/16305586/considerations-to-know-about-newegg-pc-configurator
http://andresabwd99134.affiliatblogger.com/16133465/an-unbiased-view-of-free-gaming-pc-parts
http://lorenzojyrl29408.pointblog.net/Examine-This-Report-on-computer-pick-a-part-16837211
http://arthurjrqo91233.diowebhost.com/12837785/computer-build-checker-secrets
http://edwinukie61147.thezenweb.com/Helping-The-others-Realize-The-Advantages-Of-pick-a-part-oc-17967333
http://rowanzpak03692.fitnell.com/16171305/new-step-by-step-map-for-assembled-desktop-computer
http://cristianrgfv11110.dbblog.net/7881248/not-known-details-about-pc-part-build
http://raymondjjif68876.tinyblogging.com/The-Basic-Principles-Of-parts-pic-16077835
http://connerfomj65324.ezblogz.com/8080847/the-basic-principles-of-define-part
http://deanovuo00223.designertoblog.com/8024962/helping-the-others-realize-the-advantages-of-pick-a-part-oc
http://damienrywn51738.blogs-service.com/8016332/pc-pcpartpicker-an-overview
http://mariokhzp00099.bluxeblog.com/8014397/the-basic-principles-of-parts-pic
http://shanenfrb60369.mpeblog.com/2119547/helping-the-others-realize-the-advantages-of-c-part-picker
http://sergiohkgy50505.articlesblogger.com/2090178/an-unbiased-view-of-free-gaming-pc-parts
http://fernandoaqbk93692.blogerus.com/2115252/not-known-facts-about-builds-pc
http://franciscolsqi40628.arwebo.com/2087798/how-custom-gaming-pc-parts-can-save-you-time-stress-and-money
http://emiliolsju46937.blogpostie.com/2113685/a-simple-key-for-pcparrpicker-unveiled
http://kamerondgcv06284.bloggin-ads.com/2114709/helping-the-others-realize-the-advantages-of-pick-a-part-oc
http://kylerjuzy06273.blogprodesign.com/2111236/build-a-computer-online-simulator-secrets
http://daltonumxg81470.qowap.com/16363734/pcpartpickerr-an-overview

Photo of An Old Friend

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Perhaps shifting our focus from children to adults, especially parents/primary caregivers, is a step towards the right direction.

Photo of Theodora Papatheodorou

The first five years of life are a time of rapid physical growth and change and these are the years when eating behaviours and future eating patterns develop. During these early years, children are learning what, when, and how much to eat.

Infants are biologically predisposed to accept certain foods and not others. This begins during pregnancy, when the fetus becomes familiar with the flavours of the maternal diet. However, children's food preferences are also determined by the kind and amount of foods they are available to them and they are influenced by the eating behaviour of others and the association of eating with social events and context.

Perhaps shifting our focus from children to adults, especially parents/primary caregivers, is a step towards the right direction. Changing the dietary intake of pregnant women and modifying adults' eating behaviours and patterns are as much important as having access to healthy food. Making eating a social event with positive connotations and enabling observation of desired eating behaviours from early on in life set the foundations for future eating patterns. In our proposal in this challenge for capacity building on integrated early childhood care and development (entitled: Educate the adult to educate the child) , we address the issue of eating under the wider topic of nutrition.

Photo of DeletedUser

DeletedUser

I really like the idea.

 I remember when I was a kid. our food in school was a coca can and a cheese sandwich! which effected badly my teeth.

Photo of dan denys

The children couldn’t identify a tomato. This highlighted a real issue of fresh food, the lack of knowledge, and how easy it could be to develop cooking skills for kids of all ages and skills.
http://www.cantecedecopii.com

Photo of Charlie Ong

Why not have cooking classes in school. Children as young as 4 can watch and see real food being cooked properly.

If it is too much of a hassle, then just show some cooking shows.

Photo of Diego Rodriguez

This is going to be a great one. Kids eat what they eat -- and they learn by doing. How might we help more kids experience a wide variety of foods, earlier in their life, and with frequency?

Photo of Macrina Busato

And first of all, they learn from parents/family behaviour. Teach first the parents behaviour around food.

Photo of Eva Juwita

Educate them at the early age. Share our knowledge about all type of food, tell them which one is healthy, which one is not. Personally, I will give them a book to read about all kind of food, with all the benefit of the food itself. Build their mind with the healthy lifestyle. Nowadays, a lot of children like to eat junk food, not because it is fast and tasty, but because of they are cheaper than fresh food. So, it is better to tell them the consequences of eating junk food, give them a video about the results of eating food that are not fresh.

Photo of Loan Huynh

Just like any ideas or change, educating future members of society starts at an early age. Providing them the knowledge of origin of the food and making it more enticing to eat may spark interest not only into a healthy lifestyle as they age but also a stronger future for themselves in society. I recently starting juicing and even incorporating kids at an early age of not only what they eat but what they drink may be more fun to show them how to juice different fruits and vegetables.

Growing up, having two younger sisters, to try to implement and build good habits into them, I would ask them at the end of every day "what was you fruit of the day" and if by dinner time they did not have a fruit, they would need to eat it by then... That was just a fun way of having them eat more fruits...

Photo of Jess Fox

I am a passionate cook and thrive on creating dishes from scratch which includes sourcing ingredients. Getting children involved in growing their own vegetables can have a huge impact on their motivation to eat healthier foods by having the reward of eating at the end. The experience of growing their own plants has an enriching impact and the explorative nature of gardening can enhance creativity. Making the experience of eating a family/ friends occasion makes it a social experience and enhances the memory to give a positive impact. The motivation of eating healthily can come from being creative with ingredients, even more so when time is tight. Children should perhaps be more involved in the cooking process, seeing it as an exciting experience and not simply a step in their day.

Photo of chang liu

love your ideas.

Photo of chang liu

In order to enable children to know the benefits of fresh food and make them to choose that by themselves, we surely should take some measures. Since fresh food contain more nutrients and vitamins for the human needed. Fresh food not only affect kids'growth, but also make adults to live longer. Kids like fast food because they are tasty, so i think maybe there's some way that to make fresh food also delicious may helps.

Photo of mengyuan chen

It is vey important to tell children the benefits of eating fresh food rather than fast food or canned food.
1. Fresh foods have great flavor and taste because they keep all their natural conditions.
2. Fast food and canned food are much more expensive than fresh food. And also, fresh food is easier to find.
3. Fresh food is much more healthier than fast food or canned food.

Photo of Congmin Liang

I like the points you made in your post, but I think the second you mentioned "Fast food and canned food are much more expensive than fresh food. " I don't think the Fast food and canned food are expensive than fresh food. I believe that in nowadays live, fresh foods are more expensive than fast food, because they are more healthy than fast food. And right now more and more people are more focus on to live in a healthy live, so based on the market demand, I think the fast food would have lower price than fresh food, that why Whole Food market are more expensive than other place, because they provide more fresh and health food than other place.

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Yes, I partly agree with you that some of fresh food are more expensive than fast food. However, I believe some of them are not actually. I like the example of Whole food market that you provided above. It is very happy to hear that you like my ideas. Lets have fresh food more than fast food in the future.

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Thank you again, and you are welcome. Thank for agree with my point.

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I also don't think fast food is more expensive and hard to get, as my knowledge. However, I think you have a good point.

Photo of Fei Xin

In order to let the kids can choose to eat fresh food, so cultivate kids healthy habits of eating is very important. Fresh foods contain more nutrients and vitamins for the human needed. Fresh food not only affect kids' growth, but also make adults who live longer. Now kids like to eat fast food, and even adults who also do that. Such as McDonald's or buger king, and so on. I have to admit that fast food is indeed more delicious than fresh food, and it could save more time. However, fast food will directly affect our health. Although the sign of "organic" fresh food is more expensive than fast food, but for the kids' health and also reduce many diseases, we must choose to eat fresh food everyday.

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To let kids eat fresh food is very important, because kids need more pabulum than their parents, and the fresh food could provide what the kids need.
But right now a lot of kids like to eat fast food or some unhealth snacks, which is not good for them to grow up. I am not agree with Mengyuan said "Fast food and canned food are much more expensive than fresh food. And also, fresh food is easier to find." As we all know the fast food and canned food are much cheaper than the fresh food, and they are more easily to get even in the supermarket. We should let kids parents to buy more fresh and health food, because they could get more benefits from them.

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As a child, my father would also celebrate "strawberry season" and "sales on watermelon;" I gained my love of fresh fruit because my parents treated good fruit as a special treat (based on the season) the way others treat ice cream and soda as a treat. If we teach our children to appreciate the fresh seasonal fruits and vegetables and celebrate the opportunity to eat them, then they will begin to see them as prizes and eat them intentionally.

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DeletedUser

Why don't we start having ice cream trucks sell fresh fruits desserts or sorbets instead of sugar treats? - That's a junk food targeting idea...
As for teaching the kids about where food comes from, I suggest making it a school program (perhaps a requirement) to have one field trip every year to take the kids to the nearest farm and learn about food origin, or have a gardening component to every primary school.

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DeletedUser

it is a good idea!
kids love trucks since they associate them with nice memories.
making trucks buying fruits desserts or sorbets instead would attract more children.

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DeletedUser

1. Keep telling them the benefit of eating fresh food.
2. Let them see videos on the results of eating food that are not fresh
3. Enhance the education at school on the importance of eating fresh food
4. Children will not change until they see the result of something. I think parents can let their children alone eating something that are not fresh.They will realize it is important to eat fresh food

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DeletedUser

1. Keep telling them the benefit of eating fresh food.
2. Let them see videos on the results of eating food that are not fresh
3. Enhance the education at school on the importance of eating fresh food
4. Children will not change until they see the result of something. I think parents can let their children alone eating something that are not fresh.They will realize it is important to eat fresh food

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DeletedUser

Healty Eating - A Learning Experince
Today’s children should be inspired from a young age to grasp the aspect of a healthy lifestyle.
Knowledge is power and to give children knowledge through implementing positive learning experiences of healthy choices into their education could make all the difference. E.g. Fruit and veg could be used to educated young minds of colours and shapes – correct answers could be rewarded with a taste of the product.
I am excited to see progress from this challenge - there are so many opportunities.

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DeletedUser

Local vegetable growing apprenticeships for young people.
Make veg growing cool.
Earn as you grow.

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I'm having a hard time not "Applauding" every concept I see here. As a food and cooking lover, I think developing early awareness and passion for nutrition is essential in fighting hunger, obesity, and many other social health issues. When it comes to kids, I'm all for empowering and educating rather than "tricking" them or trying to hide veggies in desserts. Success can be tricky when we're fighting busier lives, a faster-moving society, and social issues that compete for mindshare and funding -- we need to work within the psychological and practical limitations that make solving the problem so challenging, so I know that design thinking approaches will be the ones that work. Looking forward to following these concepts!

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DeletedUser

As the owner of a well known dance company, Hip Hop Kidz Inc. I believe that kids need a nutritional component in addition to their fitness and dance programs. I very much like the idea of starting with kindergarten kids as once they are teens getting them to look at fruits and vegetables is a daunting task. Good for you Jamie!

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DeletedUser

You won't teach me about fresh fruit and vegetables. I don't have time. And unless your professional chef neither do you. we are world of specialists doing what we do best and paying other specialists to mind the rest for us. So, Here is what I want from you Jamie.
A line of food products sold in every supermarket I frequent that is:
A) Nutritionally complete.
B) With little or no preparation(think microwave, or nothing)
C) That I can eat right out of the package.

I am down with a nutritionally complete paste I can suck from a tube every meal, but it would be handier if you labeled each of your products by time of day I'm supposed to eat it.....Breakfast...snack....Lunch....snack....Diner. You could even go so far as to color code by family member, dark blue for dad, light blue for teen, really light blue for toddler. etc.

a food container that's viable in real world supermarket made of some kind of edible corn chip or whatever the height of new food technology can produce would be innovative.

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DeletedUser

I'm attacking the problem from a school focus on building a community garden for the kids to grow their own food and then using the food in the food technology classes and in the school canteen.
I have involved the aged members of the local community in the gardening as mentors to the students and as cooking educators, showing the students different ways they can use the fresh foods in their recipes. Not only does it teach students about growing thier own fresh foods and how to use them but it also builds great cross generational links and is a positive experience for all groups.

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DeletedUser

Big fan of school gardens because they not only offer a fresh and healthy nutritional compliment to a school meal, but also serve as mother nature's lab to teach so many things like biology, chemistry, math, etc. As an educator, organic producer and mother of three boys experience has shown me two basic things: one food has to taste good and two interacting with the garden must be fun. My children were brought up composting and milking goats, but two of the three hated vegetables, so I would simply 'disguise' them into pasta sauces, cakes ( carrot, zucchini, pumpkin) jams, etc. and here is where mom and grandma and other people in the community play a role, by learning about and teaching different cultural culinay traditions.

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DeletedUser

Jamie,
It has been a year since the OpenIDEO challenge already. I wonder if all the amazing inspirations, concepts and winning ideas captured here are still being of use. I hope so! Lots of progress has been made through your Food Revolution and I admire your commitment and determination on this extremely important quest. Your work inspires me. There are lots of obstacles still to tackle, though, so might expanding some more on the strongest concepts posted on OpenIDEO be beneficial? I live in the UK and I am a Mum, and it frustrates me to see that still so many other Mums have no idea how to feed their kids a healthy meal each day. I am proud that my daughter, now 6 years old, has never eaten a chicken nugget and eats food cooked from scratch every day at home – and, thanks to you, she eats healthy school dinners too. She loves cooking with me and is now even inventing her own recipes and suggesting what we could eat as a family. But I know that I am an exception to the rule – the mindset is still of junk food in too many households. I have done some cooking with the children at my daughter’s infant school and it was great to see the kids getting stuck into cooking (and enjoying it!) and trying new foods they had not eaten before. Very rewarding. These are baby steps, though. What next?

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DeletedUser

This may have already been said....but what if we made choosing the 'bad foods' more difficult.

Take the design of the school cafeteria. Most people load up their plate as they move from the beginning of a line towards the end. Use choice architecture. Put the healthy foods near the beginning of the line and the 'bad food' towards the end - most likely kids will have less room on their plate for the unhealthy food by the time they get to them.

Make the line up narrower - make it harder for people to go back to the front of the line. This means that as you move along you'll most likely fill up your plate for "fear of missing out" - if you get too far down without filling up you'll know you won't be able to go back to get more.

Make the bad food...well, look bad. Paint the heat lamps brown and green. Make those greasy fries look as offputting as possible.

Make it harder to reach the unhealthy food. Literally, put them further back. Use containers that allow the food to flow out the top so that it looks like more than it is.

Put deserts at a station located in the middle of the cafeteria so that to have a brownie you'd have to walk in front of all of your peers to get one.

Kids, like everyone else, find it difficult not to succumb to temptation. So, why not give them a break by making it more difficult to actually access the bad food in the first place.



  

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DeletedUser

Along with all that you could also make healthier choices cheaper and higher quality and unhealthy choices more expensive and less profitable to sell, while making healthier options more profitable to sell (specifically through incentives for all community groups & schools etc). The whole range of community groups and schools offer a good channel/means to affect culture and engaging and educating people with healthier food choices.

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DeletedUser

I've noticed with my own kids that marketing/branding is very influential and looms large these days. We encountered a Dora labeled apple package at the market and not only was the package the first item placed in the cart but the entire package was eaten with 24 hours.

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I think another factor is convenience. Unhealthy food often comes in ready to eat forms e.g. chips and chocolate, whereas healthy equivalents often require substantial preparation which is less convenient. Imagine if a kid reached out for fresh carrot sticks for a snack rather than potato chips instead.

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DeletedUser

Idea = a Dora/Wiggles special of the day - Big flashing sign above the fresh fruit and veg section. The education starts in the show content though. My son watches the Wigles then asks me for an apple GOLD! The corporates aren't going away so lets look for more innovative ways to partner with them for healthy community outcomes.

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DeletedUser

The food pyramid needs a makeover.

Currently the food pyramid shows grains and healthier food on the bottom and sweets on the top. This is a good representation in terms of quantity. However, it also has another connotation related to quality that misrepresents the food groups. The pyramid structure is used elsewhere in the education system to show importance and quality on the top. (e.g. leadership, government, etc.)

Is it possible that kids see sweets on top of the food pyramid and associate them with quality and not suggested quantity?

I believe kids are generally ‘present hedonistic’ and that quantity over a period of time is a difficult idea for kids to grasp. They are more likely to associate with quality and tastes (present time orientation), rather than diet (future orientation).

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Good news! USA replaced their food pyramid with a proportion plate!

Photo of Vincent Cheng

Check out the new USDA Plate ( http://www.choosemyplate.gov/ ) revamp of the Food Pyramid! The easy-to-comprehend visual simplicity & nudge reminds me of Chris's Zones on Plates Inspiration ( http://bit.ly/jY2CI0 ), my Bento Box of Superpowers concept ( http://bit.ly/ei9bVq ), and of course Axel's brilliant Color-Coded Shopping Cart concept ( http://bit.ly/eN0nCg )

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MeYouHealth (http://www.facebook.com/meyouhealth?sk=app_129399577129549) has a Munch Madness Challenge where fruits and veggies go head-to-head and people vote for their favs. Started with 32, 16 fruits and 16 veg. That was narrowed down to 8 of each and now fruits and veggies are against each other... there will be an ultimate fruit or veg! Something like this is a simple and fun way to put fruit and veggies in the spotlight... and maybe encourage people to try new ones!

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DeletedUser

Much has already been seen here. I would just like to highlight an initiative I learned about: physicist Fritjof Capra (author of Tao of Physics and Hidden Connections) is initiator of Schooling for Sustainability in the US, which starts with educating pupils on the lunch box. See http://www.ecoliteracy.org/discover/what-schooling-sustainability

For me, it is quite essential to educate parents, not just kids. Parents often give the bad example on nutrition. Of course, they are more difficult to educate (are day?) but are also a great leverage when eco-education is done.

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DeletedUser

Also to read more about choice architecture check out the book 'Nudge' by Richard Thaler.

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i just joined openIdeo and found this challenge. Great and hugely important challenge. Two issues: 1) kids knowing about and wanting fresh foods and 2) having access to them. If you live in an inner city, you probably have access to liquor stores, gas station convenience stores, and fast food outlets, but not to urban green grocers. How about tax incentives (serious cash) for grocery chains and food producers for getting fresh foods into needy areas. Other financial incentives to schools that replace junk food with healthy foods. Create a Halls of Fame and Shame for our public officials that fail to actively support proper nutrition. Create a version of Farmville that teaches children and adults about nutrition.

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DeletedUser

U need to start at the very beginning - with kids so that the whole generation can be guided correctly. I remember my daughter was in primary when her teacher taught them that colas and aerated drinks are not good for teeth - she taught kids thro an experiment - she told her class that when their milch tooth fell, they shuld bring it to her. She put it in a glass of cola and in a few days the tooth was missing - it has dissolved in the cola - and ever since then my daughter rarely drank colas or aertated drinks - she insists o fresh fruit juices! Education need to be imparted right at the start and also needs to have that lasting impact!

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DeletedUser

It starts in the beginning. Only make available good foods and that is all they will eat. My son asks for fruit every day, never candy or junk. (well the occasional ice cream sharing) Plus parents need to learn to eat better.

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Just an update for you all, with an example of what can be done with regulation: http://www.fastcompany.com/1699915/no-more-mcdonalds-happy-meals-for-san-francisco-kids

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I loved this project. is a pity that I discovered later, but the work has been done has been great. Thanks for the book that summarizes the entire project!

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Hi all,

Hope I could contribute before, but discovered the website about an 1h ago.

The subject it-self is very large, but I have one idea that could be the starting point of an answer to your challenge Mr Oliver.
 
I - Developing reflexes that last over time.
To grab attention of kids and initiate in them the knowledge, there's no better way then taking a conditioning action object that they use every day. My first answer here would be to use the Toy as a starting point. We all know for example that kids often take the "Happy Meals " for the toy inside of it, more then the food itself. And it's a very clever move here I think to grab kids awareness. Moreover, by developing a reflex in kids early development, there's more chances that they will keep them in the future. That object could be the plate or the tableware itself.

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DeletedUser

Dear Jamie, I'm a Public Relations in Brazil and I love cooking and watching your TV programs. Here in Brazil we have a very interesting program called Alimente-se bem (eating well) . The responsible for this is the organization SESI (Social Service of Industry) http://migre.me/1G8xy The proposal is to teach the workers and their families prepare several recipes using all the food, including barks, stems and leaves of fruit and vegetables, avoiding waste and therefore reducing food expenditures.
Finally , if you need someone to work as PR volunteer here in Brazil with your Food Revolution program, we can do it.


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DeletedUser

It's great that such good work is being done in this regard. I am a new user at open IDEO and wanted to contribute to this project with some of my own ideas and inspirations. Is it still possible to do that? How do I contribute to teh Inspiration section?

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DeletedUser

Jamie, this is an enromous challenge and I think it is great to use OPEN Ideo to get ideas. I've been actively participating with Concepts, comments, etc, over the last couple of months, as I am also passionate about this issue. I think the 'ultimate' solution may end up being a combination of quite a few of the concepts. One thing alone won't be enough to 'break the habit', educate and start a new culture, on a global scale... But several inititaives together, might!! Just like transforming School Dinners and so many of your other initialives were a success, I'm sure this project will lead to another big positive result!

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DeletedUser

thank you james for doing this project. its is really hard to go against all this bad habits so thank you.
there is only one thing, one topic that i haven't seen anything about it, and for me it is really important to think about it.
To make big changes in a longer term you should make workshops with pregnant mothers, why? because at this moment of their lives they are worried about their baby, and projecting their future, they want to do their best and they accept better new ideas to raise a child better. Also, the kids are not addicted to bad habits yet.
  

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DeletedUser

My observation is this: All these kids already behave like addicts. Their bodies have already been corrupted by large amounts of Fat + Sugar and they will not give it up easily. They can not, because it is what their body wants and needs. So i'll say this: In the beginning you will have to use some kind of force to get them away from bad food. You will not get an addict to give up his/her drug by only using positive reinforcement. However so far i have only seen this friendly kind of approach, which makes me think: Maybe we just don't take the problem serious enough?

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DeletedUser

Let Kids cook using fresh veg and fruits with all together.(Mom and Daddy)
Then,they will enjoy eating fresh food and know that it's benefits

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DeletedUser

It's appaling that kids don't know what their veg looks like. There's this program, food connect, which delivers organic fruit and veg from withing 250km radius. Wouldn't it be great if kids got their veg in a box this way? Anything beats salad from a plastic bag! and the element of surprise, of not knowing what you are getting...amazing for kids.

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DeletedUser

it's simple. Gross them out about eating anything other than fresh food. I still won't drink a glass of water that's been sitting longer than an hour because I'm still freaked out over dustmites and parasites.

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DeletedUser

Simple: make healthy food taste good. Kids/People like unhealthy because it is good. Let's go Jamie! Let's get to work! Maybe let's start on snacks, since thats what people eat when they are bored, or trying to pass time. Or as a break away from the day. Anyways I'll be in my kitchen.

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DeletedUser

Target new moms. I was bombarded during pregnancy with information regarding the nutritional value of breast feeding. Subsequent to that was the importance of giving vitamins. Seems like an educational step was missed: How to begin to feed a first-time eating child in a way that will sustain a healthy pattern of eating for years to come by creating a love and desire for the foods that matter. It's not more difficult to feed a child well than poorly from the beginning. A blueberry is as easy to hand a child as a cookie. The education isn't there, though, and ironically I think that new moms are more motivated than most target populations. They want to do a good job, are even fearful of not doing a good job, and are already in the mindset of "starting fresh". That could be the slogan: Starting Fresh. It's much harder to work backwards.

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I am a secondary school student. When I go supermarket shopping with my mum, the first thing in the trolley is usually something sweet. But not anymore, since a health worker recently visited my school I have been eating a lot more fruit. I have recently taken to eating bananas, kiwifruit and other fruits. All schools around the world should get this type of education.

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DeletedUser

@ Harvey Brice
A wise man once said: "No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it" (A.E.).

It's up to us 'the people' to do something about it. Don't waste your time....

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DeletedUser

Instead of trying to stop junk food consumption in exchange for going back to basics why not move forward and engage in the junk food industry to create junk which has a higher nutritional value. We need healthy food, we enjoy junk food, it's time for the Hybrid...

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DeletedUser

Make it fun. Start from the very beginning and teach them how to garden, show them how playing in the dirt can really turn into something. You could do anything from a couple window boxes growing herbs and lettuce to a rooftop garden with rows of corn and every variety of peppers they could find. Then you could teach them how to prepare the food. If the garden is big enough it could supply lunch for a school full of kids. Even do class trips to local farms to learn about where there meat comes. -It would probably turn many kids into vegetarians (which may be the best outcome). Or at least educate the children to support their local organic farms. The key would be to start young.

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DeletedUser

Wish I had more time! There are so many inspirations and concepts. Wish I was paid to check them all out, 'cause there are answers in there.

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DeletedUser

the world is obviously moving towards social networks and technology as the strongest means of communication and discussion. It is a case of how best to use this medium. Children are still going to want to play games and therefore developing apps and informative games would seem to be an obvious answer.
The use of peer groups through social networks too has never been stronger and will continue to grow. Jamie your use of groups to champion recipes etc to pass on I think is a great way to go. It is how to make this concept the 'cool' thing to do so that the influences within groups adopt quickly.

Tym

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DeletedUser

Why don't we start having ice cream trucks sell fresh fruits desserts or sorbets instead of sugar treats? - That's a junk food targeting idea...
As for teaching the kids about where food comes from, I suggest making it a school program (perhaps a requirement) to have one field trip every year to take the kids to the nearest farm and learn about food origin, or have a gardening component to every primary school.

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DeletedUser

I think the first step in this process needs to be a change in what is served in school lunch rooms. Having a variety of healthy choices every day instead of the usual pizza and hamburgers would greatly influence kids. Even the picky kids will eventually have to find some sort of healthy food they like.

Designing a hands-on, Montessori-style health/cooking/nutrition course at the middle school and high school level will force kids to learn how to care for themselves and make healthy choices.

There is no real way to motivate every single young person to eat healthily. However, exposure and mandatory education will greatly reduce the number of those kids that slip off of the deep end into severe obesity.

--from a college kid who never learned how to cook.

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I think TV program works, because after i watched the programs about health on BBC, I changed my eating habit. Plus kids watch TV everyday, so i think add more TV program about healthy eating is a good idea.

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DeletedUser

I firmly believe that children (and their parents) should be educated about what is healthy eating and bad foods.

I wonder if there is a way to integrate valuable content from health/food websites and blogs.

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DeletedUser

what would be the benefits to kid..? firstly, it would be 'delicious'.
I'm not sure whether if they have a complex idea on 'fresh'.

to let them know that fresh food is more delicious than the fastfood or frozenfood, I'd like to tell them that every food has their own taste and vitality. and it'll perish away as time goes by.

So, the sooner, the fresher and the more delicious.

by the way, this issue is what I'm concerning now(my little baby is 10 months old)
so, I(& my wife) am always thinking what to give to her?

I will keep a close eye on this 'challenge'.

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DeletedUser

You can find the answer in a book written by an IDEO-man, Tom kelley. "The ten faces of Innovation." when he talked about how 'Observing' and 'Contacting' with the kids can make a huge difference and can inspire a lot with the way you produce your product. The answer can be in the simplest form as we are talking about kids who have simple but vivid minds. a comic book with little cute, catchy pictures can be the answer. Parents -who know about fresh food and cooking- can come talk to the kids and open discussions for them to see what do they like and what they don't and it might help later to see for real what kids need, or what might be fetish enough to provide them with fresh and healthy meal.


regards,
--

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Startups redesign your local grocery and bring fresh food to the customer: www.relayfood.com.

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I understand and appreciate food that I prepare myself much more than food someone else prepares. I imagine the same applies (perhaps even more) for kids. For many kids, though, the problem is that they can't use (or don't know how to use) lots of the utensils.

A couple of useful issues to address:
-Cutting utensils: How can we make it so children can safely cut/chop/slice food ingredients like vegetables?
-Heat: How can we make ovens and stoves safer for children who don't have experience using them? How can we prevent children from burning themselves or accidentally leaving a burner or oven turned on?

I think it might be great to have a touch-screen web interface where kids can browse, download and share simple, healthy recipes they enjoy, along with simple illustrated and/or video instructions on how to prepare them. This would have to be something they could have with them as they prepare the food. Recipes could be accompanied by step-by-step videos of basic tasks in the recipe.

Another key challenge is ingredients. Kids often don't do the planning or purchasing of food. They need ways to organize and communicate the ingredients they'd like to work with to their parents, or a simple way to find out what dishes are feasible with healthy foods they have on hand.

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DeletedUser

I just love the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Gardren Program being set up in Australian schools www.kitchengardenfoundation.org.au Taken from website - 'The aim of the Kitchen Garden Program is pleasurable food education for young children. The underlying belief is that by introducing this holistic approach we have a chance to positively influence children’s food choices in ways that have not been tried before. A Kitchen Garden is created to provide edible, aromatic and beautiful resources for a kitchen. The creation and care of a Kitchen Garden teaches children about the natural world, about its beauty and how to care for it, how best to use the resources we have, and an appreciation for how easy it is to bring joy and wellbeing into one’s life through growing, harvesting, preparing and sharing fresh, seasonal produce'. An evaluation report is also now available on the website highlighting all the amazing results the program is achieving.

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DeletedUser

Two things:
- Involve kids in projects that show the foundation of growing and cooking.
- Have adults be an example by eating the things that they would like kids to eat.

Example projects:
- growing a garden in a group plot or even a planter garden
- making an earth oven
- cooking what they grew in the oven that they made.

Pizza in an earth oven is pretty good, and it is cheap to make if you have a bunch of labor.

Something as simple as popping popcorn in a pan with olive oil is pretty cool to a kid that has only done it in a bag in the microwave.

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DeletedUser

My comment involves a slight reframing of the challenge. Not that the challenge isn't worthy, I just feel that it assumes a central point of leverage as a starting position that isn't going to maximize the desired outcome. Check out this TED talk from Jason Clay of WWF. http://www.ted.com/talks/jason_clay_how_big_brands_can_save_biodiversity.html

He discusses something he calls "a precompetitive issue" with regards to sustainable consumer goods. (Apply it here to "healthy foods"). In other words, we can't afford to leave choice up to the consumers (in this case, kids) as the issues are simply too daunting and complex. If we do, we're working at the wrong end of the equation. He talks about how he and his team have targeted the 100 largest companies to change the worlds' commodities that most threaten the planet. He brought fierce competitors like Coke and Pepsi, Cargill and its largest compeitor etc. to the table to work together to save what they all care about most -- the long term health of the commodities they need to survive.

There is an important lesson here for this challenge. We can't be working at the kid end of the equation. Or the parents. Or the schools. (Well, we can, but it's the least effective place to work). We need to be tackling the issue from the big brand/ big corporation end and we need to find ways to make it strikingly clear that finding the solution to the problem is in their corporate, financial interest.

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DeletedUser

I agree with Jacob. Make the learning (or purchasing fun). Much like Snapple added interest to vending machines by grabbing a glass bottle and allowing it to drop to the ground (which made me want to buy more Snapple). Imagine two vending machines, one with your average over-processed food, the other with fresh fruit. The "bad" candy machine simply drops your item, while the "good" machine uses a very "Dr. Seuss"-like pneumatic tube that shoots your healthy snack through winding tubes with whimsy and science.

Engage kids minds, and they will start to associate fun with fresh, good with healthy.

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DeletedUser

For me the answer is "FUN".

Check out this link http://thefuntheory.com/

When you use fun you can get people to do all sorts of things they would usually deem as work or uninteresting such as taking the stairs, throwing away litter.

So all that needs doing is to turn preparing food into a game. Maybe kids should be involved in the choosing of school dinners each month thus learning of the health benefits. Or involved with the growing of the food that they will eventually eat. we just need to find a way to make it interesting for the children.

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DeletedUser

http://www.gestalten.com/books/detail?id=ceaea7651b8d326c011cd21a01000207

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DeletedUser

Firstly, this site is awesome. It's something I've always wanted to build. Way to harness the global "train of thought!"

Personally, I feel like I make better eating decisions after I exercise. After yoga or a run or bike ride, I turn away from fatty and oily foods and actually crave crunchy romaine lettuce and ripe and juicy fruit. Is it chemicals, like endorphins, sending signals to my brain to eat healthy? Perhaps, it's worth exploring.

If it is true, then why not switch recess and lunch? Have the kids run around and play first - and then send them to lunch in the cafeteria. This way, they've worked up ana appetite and they'll be ready to tackle the healthy and delicious foods that Jamie's cooked up with a healthy and hearty appetite.

Secondly, I think part of the blame lies with the cafeteria workers in schools. It's simply too easy to cook up fast food, ie. hamburgers/hotdogs for the masses. There needs to be government certification, higher salaries, and training for cafeteria "chefs" that include childhood to teenager nutrition courses, how to create healthy menus, basic vegetable chopping/knife skills, and ratings for different schools cafeterias. Why aren't there Michelin stars for school cafeteria chefs? A Chef in a school cafeteria should feel just as much pride as a Michelin chef. Serving kids healthy and delicious meals they will eat is a challenge that's worth at least a Michelin star or, even two!

Lastly, we, as consumers, have to improve our expectations of the food industry. The FDA also shares responsibility. When soda contains the equivalent of 10 packets of sugar and the FDA allows it, there's something wrong with the Food and Drug Administration. I'm not advocating gruel but certain products, ie. Big Macs with 1040mg of salt (2,400mg is the daily recommended level for sodium), are allowed for consumption, our government is allowing food companies to make America obese. Can we classify certain foods with sky-high sugar and sodium levels as "drugs"? Aren't these foods addictive and life threatening when consumed in high quantities? We're a nation high on the "food drug."

Disclosure: I've had my share of school lunches and I still love french fries.

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DeletedUser

I agree this is a monster of a challenge. It has many components from the downright hostile food environment to skills of cooking and feeding, to budget, to perception of convenience and effort to enjoyment from providing and eating together.
As for the method, one can not use the way our parents were taught to eat and feed in this different environment today. (Really, it was not that long ago that my mom cooked chicken soup from taking a chicken off the yard....and I have never touched a live chicken, my kids have never seen anything else than the chunks of meat on a plastic tray).

With any challenge too big to approach at once, one breaks it down to pieces. Why not teach parents and kids the art of "making it happen" in small pieces? Make breakfast happen can start with setting the plates the night before, can graduate to cracking an egg (my kids were very keen on this part), and choosing a marginally better cereal or switching to oatmeal, to checking how you feel by 10 or 11 am? Can be delivered over the internet for scale and triggering the action.

Same applies for parents. Your child will go through a phase when they turn new food down. Instead of despair, do small steps, offer a vegetable again and again, in different consistency or paired with familiar food, or when they are hungry, or involve the child in preparing.

The traditional grocery stores are in actuality more like battlefields, where there are all kinds of barriers you have to overcome (from ads to the messages on the front of the box to shelf placement to the sheer ratio of undesirable food like substance to desirable food) in order to assert yourself and get to the fresh food you want. Great basis for a computer game: Agent Fresh scoring points on buying macaroni and cheese separately and cooking it thus missing the preservatives and colors, or buying tomato sauce and a veggie for the pizza sauce instead of buying a frozen pizza, (bonus points for dough!!!) or mixing plain yogurt with fruit for reducing added sugar by 10 grams.


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DeletedUser

I am not American, I'm Mexican and we have the exact same problem with our children. We're the first place in child obesity. I think we should educate them by having some sort of cooking class (with healthy food obviously) added to their school program.

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DeletedUser

Another thought: My niece started to "cook" in the kitchen with her mom and dad when she was only two. While they were cooking the actual dinner, my niece would stand on a little step stool, away from the hot stove, and they would give her all kinds of things to "cook" with--sugar, flour, noodles, nuts (mostly dry goods), measuring spoons, bowls, etc.... They let her make as big of a mess as she wanted to, and always talked with her about what she was making.

As she got older, they started to have her help actually make the food they were making: measuring ingredients, putting seasoning on meats, and washing fresh vegetables. To their surprise, she already knew how to measure some ingredients and knew the names of almost every ingredient they were using....

Far too often we buy our kids plastic play food (much if it branded with a fast food chain or junk food logo) and they pretend to cook. Why not let them actually COOK with REAL foods? I know for parents it's extra time and can be a mess, but maybe there is a "class" at daycares where kids can help make healthy lunches or an after school program focusing on food...

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DeletedUser

Many of the thoughts that I have are already shared below, so GREAT conversation so far, friends!

I do want to call out that I think that one of the hurdles to this problem is that people are intimidated by what they don't know. I hear people around me every day say that they don't cook because it's too time consuming and too expensive and that they don't garden because they don't know how and they don't have time. Therefore, I think we need to make food (and food-related activities like gardening and grocery shopping) less intimidating for both adults and children...

Show the simple side of food-what's easy, what's quick, what's least expensive. Show this to the parents while simultaneously teaching kids how food can be fun and not scary.

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DeletedUser

Great thoughts everyone! I very much agree with the need to teach our children Food in the classroom. Additionally, this educational concept needs to be at the core of Parent Teacher Associations as well. It can be a struggle to get parents involved with their children's education, but as we all know - it dramatically improves results.

I also agree with the need to target super markets. Jamie mentioned in his TED lecture, the use of Super Market Food Ambassadors. Great point. Could we create certain hours where this "Ambassador" targets children? Like just after school, for example. Have the Ambasador in costume (i.e. Super Hero, Animal Costume, etc) and help children learn about healthy shopping with their parents.

Community and school gardens - people have mentioned this, and it is wonderful. We need to show cities and towns hard evidence of the cost benefits to such a set up. My brother has been trying to set up a community garden our neighborhood, and has been running into literally thousands of dollars in roadblocks the town continues to throw at him. Due to the enormous costs involved (which in our minds is TOTALLY unnecessary) by the towns standards, the project has come to a halt.

Lastly, though a small thought - is to encourage fresh and healthy snacks at children's functions and events. Bringing fresh fruit slices back as the "norm." I have been working with Firefighters to encourage healthy eating - as the #1 killer of this population is cardiac related (dramatically influenced by diet and exercise). We are working towards a plan to lead by example. Instead of sugary snacks and hot dogs (generally served at the Fire Department "Open Houses") we can use this as a learning opportunity. Serve healthier snacks and talk about eating right, and cooking at the firehouse (a long time tradition). And what kid doesn't like a firetruck? :)

Keep the thoughts comming... we can do this!



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DeletedUser

Supermarket power

Use the power of supermarkets to raise kids’ awareness of the benefits of fresh food so they can make better choices. Of course parents are the ones that buy at the supermarket, but children have a lot of influence on parents.

Research shows supermarkets have a lot of influence on the buying behavior of families. Therefore, indirectly also on children their eating habits. Fast food chains, school canteens, big food brands, but also supermarkets can affect people in disadvantage of healthy eating* Vinkeles Melchers N.V.S. et al. (2009)
Because supermarkets are so close to their target group ‘families’ and have a lot of influence, this could also be used in an active and positive way to raise kids awareness of the benefits of fresh food. Also for the future customers (now children) of the supermarkets it would be interesting for them to make children aware of the food diversity, to be able to sell their products.

Target on children from 4-6 years who are in the intuitive phase*Piaget’s Stages of Cognitive Development. Because they are old enough to understand, play and react, even without the full knowledge of reading. Besides they are still young enough to change behavior and believe stories without the urge of detailed facts.

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DeletedUser

We found the most powerful part of Jamie's TED talk the part when he tips the sugar onto the floor. The cups of sugar were a metric would could all understand. It's human-centric language. How many cubes of sugar are in a container (not just a serving) should be visualized on the packaging of every food product.

Interesting & engaging way of visualizing ingredients (if link doesn't work please click "Still Life/0106Twinkie"): http://www.eschlimanphoto.com/twinkie/37_or_so.php

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DeletedUser

If we are going to create games that aim to teach kids about food then we need to stop kidding ourselves and start creating games they are going to WANT to play. This is a fantastic and noble idea, but it needs reality checking and help if we want it to succeed.
http://www.appsforhealthykids.com/application-gallery

McDonald's free videogame is an anti-advergame where users play the role of a McDonald's CEO, choosing whether or not to feed the player's cows genetically altered grain, or plow over rain forests, or feed the player's cows to other cows. The player can also choose advertising strategies and public official corruption to counteract opponents of the player's actions.
http://www.mcvideogame.com/

For Cafe Rouge we created an App that taught kids a spot of french in a light and informative way that allowed them to use their new skills to order their food. We married marketing and audience objectives to produce something that benefited both.
http://www.vexeddigital.com/case-studies/cafe-rouge-max-et-matilde-iphone-games/

56 Sage Street is a free online game that mixes Grand Theft Auto with Sim City to teach young people about work ethic, money management and life in a way that interests them.
http://www.56sagestreet.co.uk/

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DeletedUser

"Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants" - A simply but effective philosophy by Michael Pollan in his piece on The New York Times for how to traverse the food landscape. Timeless lessons such as these are the sorts of values we need to instill in our children when teaching them to consume in moderation.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?_r=4&pagewanted=all

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DeletedUser

Might be too late for an inspiration, but I haven't found my idea in the other posts. I'd like to see costs taken out of the equation for schools that would like to choose to buy fresh and local. Create incentives for schools to "Go Fresh", like the "Go Green" movement. There could be a certification process for schools that adopt fresh, healthy food choices, like LEED for Green buildings (http://www.greenschoolbuildings.org/Homepage.aspx). Certified schools could then be eligible for grants to offset food costs. A public-private partnership could provide the funding for such grants.

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DeletedUser

Get a colorful "z-card" printed that contains all of the main food types widely available - like hamburgers, fries, pizza, fizzy drinks... all the way up to the good stuff like fruits. This card would simply show the fat content, percentage of sugar, salt etc in each item - in a way that kids can easily understand (like a traffic light system). Now introduce some game mechanics, e.g. can you keep within your daily recommended percentage for each area (salt, sugars, fats etc), if you do - you get a merit badge - collect all 40 badges to have changed your lifetime eating habits!
You could also produce a free app (for various smart phones) that makes it more interactive (like FourSquare for e.g). The printed card and apps could be paid for by healthy food advertising - which could even go a step further to geo-locate (using AR) the nearest place that sells these types of good foods.

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DeletedUser

ideas!
get them into the garden... :)
or out to the farms/nursery's picking the fruit and veggies for their school dinners
add in loads of fresh air and exercise when getting them to eat new things

proof is in the pudding!
back in aussie land before i came to the uk, i volunteered with disadvantaged kids taking groups of 30-40 kids on camp once a month: friday - sunday. instructions to parents: feed them dinner before they come.
this generally consisted of a packet of crisps if anything at all. it soon became very apparent that the bad behaviour and grumpiness was directly related access to loads of fresh air and good food.

even though we asked the kids to be fed first, we quickly decided that no matter what time we got to camp 11pm or other, we would always rustle up a really quick homemade hot snack before they went to bed.... the added sleep we and they got was worth its weight in gold :)

in my 4 years of volunteering, before heading over to the UK, we only had one child complain he didn't want something... not bad for a bunch of 6-16 year olds... or for a bit of good, basic, well balanced, fresh, aussie homemade tucker rustled up in the camp kitchen ;)
fp

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DeletedUser

Awareness posters in school that are full of bright colors that get peoples attention. Teach it in school, maybe like teach for 5 weeks in gym. Advertising plays a big role in selling junk food, so that would probably have to be cut down. Make more advertising on good foods or whats health and whats not. Making parents aware thats a huge one too. Parents are the ones that provide the food for the kids which means they are buying the junk food for the kids. Lower the prices on health food and raise the prices on junk food.

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DeletedUser

Awareness posters in school that are full of bright colors that get peoples attention. Teach it in school, maybe like teach for 5 weeks in gym. Advertising plays a big role in selling junk food, so that would probably have to be cut down. Make more advertising on good foods or whats health and whats not. Making parents aware thats a huge one too. Parents are the ones that provide the food for the kids which means they are buying the junk food for the kids. Lower the prices on health food and raise the prices on junk food.

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Some of the biggest problems that I have noticed about the "Food Industry" is that often junk food is seen as cheap, easy, and readily available in most households. I think that it is important to step away from all of the processed foods and ask yourself, "If this bag of chips really is capable of being consumed two years from its packaging date....do I really want to ingest something with those kinds of chemicals added for the sake of its shelf-life?"

Because the minds of children are malleable, it is obvious to begin at an early age. Unfortunately, some of the biggest influences in a child's life are not necessarily what is taught in school, but what is taught in the home. I therefore believe that it is important to move in on both sides of the problem, as early as possible.

With the growth of social networking, I believe it is one option that should not be ignored, and could be a very useful resource to unite soon-to-be and current parents of children, sharing ideas and coming up with a blog and/or newsletter that contains some of the lesser known facts that may be vital to a child's later eating habits. One example of this is that, prior to this year, I had no idea that using infant formula as opposed to natural breast milk, can raise the chance of a child having obesity problems later in life, as well as problems with tooth decay and others (http://pregnancychildbirth.suite101.com/article.cfm/hazards_of_infant_formula). Parents should be encouraged to take part of their children's lives and school, and reinforce school health programs.

There needs to be a culture established; a complete overhaul of the way school systems tackle food. When I was going to High School, they had installed vending machines with pop and other beverages filled with sugar. The Cafeteria was far from inspiring in their food choice. In fact, the only day most people chose to eat cafeteria food was on Pizza day; far from a healthy food choice. If schools could step up the actual flavor of their food, as well as the nutrient value (you can't tell me that those mashed potatoes were actually real!) I believe that all students would benefit. Also- nix the vending machines, or fill them with water or other healthy beverages.

From an early age, in preschools, kindergarden, and first grade, I believe it would be beneficial to classrooms to have their own window-planter gardens, in which students could learn how to plant their choice of vegetables, and watch as the little seedlings grow. I remember my own fascination as a child growing a little bean plant in early science classes. Schools should be encouraged to begin their own garden projects, which could be maintained by middle and high schoolers, which could go as part of their science classes or as volunteer work in which classes could be held during their upkeep. Volunteer work is a coveted thing among students desiring to go to college.

Finally, for kids and adults alike that have trouble with their weight should be able to sign up for a gym that could either be provided by the school or have a program in conjunction with the school that would provide activities as well as machines and weights to work with, and trainers to help them learn what exactly the students and adults need in order to become more healthy in their activity levels. Possibly a points reward system for those that are working out regularly and meeting milestone goals. A tangible reward is often more persuasive than a couple of pounds that are not as easily noticed.

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DeletedUser

Bring the lunch ladies out of a back room, and turn it into an open kitchen. Especially at preschools and kindergartens. And involve the class in food selection and preparation. The point? If kids always see their parent(s) ordering out or opening up pre-packaged foods, they'll never make the connection. E.g. have the class pick the vegetables from the school garden (must have one), bring it to the lunch cooks to prepare it in an open kitchen in the center of the school. Architecturally, think of the Hearth as the Center of the home. This might not be feasible for public schools, but the expectation should be established in preschools and day cares.

Lastly, if you do eat out (as a busy family we do) frequent sit-down retaurants, and try to sit near the kitchen or visit the kitchen on a bathroom break.

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DeletedUser

First: Stop The Junk food Commercials at Least at (Day Time) for Kids!!

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DeletedUser

As a mom, here are the things that have worked with my son who just turned 4:

*Gardening -- he will eat anything if he picks it out of the garden
*Cooking -- if he cooked it, he will eat it. Make cooking fun so its part of the experience of eating fresh food. Whole fruit smoothies made at home are the best -- you can add kale or spinach and they don't even taste it.
*School -- make sure the teachers know that parents care about what they eat at school
*Food education -- with the abundance of processed junk food, you really have to educate them at a young age. We play a game where he guesses if food is healthy food or junk food. He's learning about calories, protein, carbohydrates and sugar. He knows it's ok to have treats sometimes if he eats healthy most of the time. Everything in moderation

I also believe that we need to push for more honest food labeling and more disclosure on restaurant menus. Our hectic lifestyles and the cost of fresh/organic food also play a big role in our diets but I have no idea how to solve those problems.

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DeletedUser

Design an online game for kids which celebrates fresh food and cooking from around the world, with a portion of revenue going to feed the hungry. Inspire kids to have fun, learn about fresh food and make the world a better place. Leverage obesity to feed the poor. How about them apples?!

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DeletedUser

i love good food and i love what OpenIDEO is doing here. For me the key issue is about re-prioritising food in our lives. To do this without sounding like a preacher, and to put this in context of a developed country (UK) where most people have enough food to eat, my approach would be to illustrate the relative value of different food experiences rather than the nutritional value of the food itself - if the food experience message gets through then the latter follows in due course...

food experience is personal so here are my 6 food experiences - i hope they trigger some ideas/hooks:

1. RESTAURANT food experience for me is a treat. it often contains tricky/quirky ingredients or is harder to cook well at home. it might not always be that good for me but i pay over the odds to eat out because its an event. The food is really important - bad food ruins it. Theres always the surprise element of not knowing what we're about to be served (menus are full of hyperbole so I discount 90% of the text), who's going to be eating what on my table or the one next door to me. Its nice to order different choices to your dinner guests as you dont have the luxury of a large kitchen and chef at home! I dont generally overdo my restaurant food intake as its too expensive - my budget regulates my intake.

2. 'CONVENIENCE' food experience for me really means i use my own kitchen but dont spend long choosing the ingredients. for convenience i accept a retailer's assumptions as to what im most likely going to eat - i know that the shop gets it's stock planning mostly right (if there arent too many reduced price items) but that probably 50% of what i pay for is probably a lazy tax (ie their packaging and profit margin). i can make the same meals at home from similar raw ingredients, probably of a better quality and with little of the wrapping. i sacrifice cost, environmental impact and possibly some quality too for my (perceived to be) more valuable leisure time and my poor food planning ability...

3. 'FAST' food experience means i walk into a heavily branded food distribution point and choose from a dumbed down selection of idiot proof meal packages made in a food factory for instant consumption. as fat/oil is a stable cooking medium it is easy for (cheap) unskilled operators (not chefs) to cook in. there's no cooking judgement but there's a level of consistency and trust delivered to the consumer at low cost and reasonable profit for the outlet. i know fast food is bad for me and for the farmer (who's produce is now commoditised and sold in bulk for buttons) but im either on the move or have planned my time badly - ie i've de-prioritised my food time. personally i dont eat much fast food as i dont enjoy eating it and afterwards it leaves me feeling guilty and/or fat! - different rules for fish & chips... natch ;-)

4. the 'PLANNED' food shopping experience is probably the healthiest way for me to obtain food but arguably a bit of a dying art. its something my mum taught me when i left for college: buy a balanced mix of fresh ingredients for pre planned meals and supplement this with some longer shelf life stuff (pasta, tins etc) and a few treats. Buy fresh from local and long life stuff from supermarkets. dont buy too much long term stuff - you're effectively holding stock for the supermarkets. As a child our shopping trips were shaped by my Mum's immaculately written out shopping list and her 'YES' file which was awesome. Every day mum would invent or source a new recipe and test it on the family. I'd ask Mum at the table what was in the meal, she'd list every ingredient and say how she cooked it and ask if us kids liked it - if so mum would put the recipe in the 'YES' file - we didnt have a NO file, we hardly ever disliked a meal, there are about 5 yes files now and they are a record of our childhoods. My mum is a brilliant cook, massively creative in the kitchen and one of her many gifts to me has been a lifelong love of cooking, trying out new stuff and recognising great food. unfortunately today with some laziness on my part and the passage of 20 yrs since i graduated from mums cooking/shopping school my food buying and eating patterns have become pretty erratic and are often led by in store promotion. im easily led - check out my tescos clubcard data for proof! ive also put on weight since i left home.... Mr Tesco has taken over from my Mum as my main food buying influence... this is a really really bad trade.

5. 'SELF SOURCED' food experience is vegetables and (until the foxes took over) eggs from my parents garden, its the fish i've caught on the beach, the birds i've shot or wild berries i've picked. this for me is the most satisfying kind of food but i know the least accessible food experience for many people. i havent experienced self sourced food by chance it has taken a concerted family effort to teach me the necessary skills to create my own self sourced food opportunities. my dad is my main teacher here and guess what we're both still learning. specialist equipment is needed to nurture a garden or to rear an animal, you need to know a farmer with a vermin problem to have a chance of sourcing a pigeon/rabbit, you also need to know how to shoot straight! and forget being squeamish. Bait choice is essential for fishing as is an understanding of the seasons and where to fish. Catching or growing your own food is only part of the deal though, you then have to prepare it for cooking - another art altogether. Self sourced meat doesn't come shrink wrapped (even if my dad always makes a pheasant look like it came from sainsbury's with a bay leaf on top before presenting it for my mum to cook it!) Only when you've completed all of these tasks, often with others, do you then actually cook it and eat it. With so much enjoyable time invested in your self sourced food you really dont want to rush this! you enjoy it. suddenly food isn't 'convenient' or 'fast' it holds real intrinsic value, its a collective experience. Unfortunately unless you have direct access to a garden/allotment/countryside/seaside/river (or know someone who does) and unless you also have the specialist skills and equipment to obtain it this food experience is often inaccessible - and is then incorrectly judged by an ignorant mass media to be elitist. Self sourced food for me is definitely a luxury as my intake is limited by my available time. This is a shame - i'd like to have the river cottage life but i also want an urban life too, its a compromise. The fastest self sourced food for me is mackerel - caught on brighton beach, prepared in 1 minute and BBQd on the beach right there. if there's anything faster id like to know it ;-)

6. 'FRIDGE ROULETTE' food experience is what can i make with what's going out of date in the kitchen and a bit of creativity. This is a game you can only play with a reasonable level of food/cooking knowledge (see Mum's cooking school above). One of the best cooks i know is a southafrican who can make anything, literally anything, into a pie! i really enjoy this type of cooking because you can really surprise yourself - create something from nothing. Perhaps its because your expectations are already set low and are generally always beaten!

Conclusion:

In the noisy and confusing world of food I'd like to REDUCE NEGATIVE FOCUS on food experiences 1,2,3 above, and INCREASE POSITIVE AWARENESS AND ACCESS to alternative food experiences 4,5 & 6.

I'd also love to promote my mum's YES file and my dads FOOD SOURCING skills as a great way to become passionate about food and cooking. my parents are food inspirational!

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DeletedUser

The basic problem here is that food became an industry. So all market laws and strategies applies to it.

Some basic ideas I come up with now:
1- food should be based on small community production, control and distribution. (such an idea would destroy a lot of our sick behaviors nowadays)

2- a fixed limitation of farming quota, to prevent more production than necessary for each community.

3- home-garden farming for basic itens like some fruits and vegetables. This would approach kids. (of course I'm considering home areas with green spaces, in big cities this would be hard to accomplish with fruits)

Overall I see the bad food problem a consequence of our way of living.

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DeletedUser

This is such a multi-layered problem that won't be fixed by one idea. It will require the combined actions at several fronts, from authorities to growers, parents, schools, consumer groups, tv cooking programs, shops,... and children at the end.
As Jamie can tell from his UK experience, changing food habits and eating culture takes several years if not decades. The matter is even harder if we consider the food industry and market development in the US. But I guess it is a good sign that discussions like this challenge are taking place.
I don't know how one can get the authorities and the big stores to change the regulations and business models but here are some thoughts from the consumer/family point of view on ideas about Healthy Eating that should be promoted.

It is cool:
- Make the association between healthy food, healthy body, healthy mind. Role models can be elite athletes, parents, teachers, models, next door guy/girl...
- Healthy food is not only vegetables. Fruits, fresh meat and fish can be healthy and tasty.

Make it fun:
- Get kids to grow their own.
- Start small gardens at home. You don't need much more than a window seal.
http://www.windowfarms.org/
- Get kids involved in the shopping. Get them to choose their fruit and veggies.
- Get them to help in the preparation. It doesn't have to be every day.
- Promote healthy snacking.

It's hard(er) but it's worth the effort:
- It might take some more thought for planning and preparation but if you care for your own and your kids health, a little effort is well worth it.
- If going to the market or whole foods store is too time consuming, there are ways of getting healthy food delivered to your door.
- Learn to cook fresh food and make it tasty.
- Teach by example.

Change the concept of food:
- If kids see you taking food more seriously than opening a box and warming it up in the microwave they will learn that food has some value and is important.
- Food is not a quick fix
- Food is not a disposable good.
- Seat to eat together and spend some time around the table. As some Mediterranean cultures can teach us, time spent in preparation and consumption of food in group promotes family and social values.

It is sustainable:
- With the right infrastructure small local food production is more sustainable than big scale farming. (I think)

It is economical:
- One has to know where to go, but it might be worth it going closer to the source of some products to find the best deals.
- Markets and small stores don't like having waste at the end of the day so they will sell the goods that are not looking so good but are still perfectly healthy for a cheaper price.

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DeletedUser

The Food Curriculum !
To curate a short term program spanning over every school subject/discipline where every class shall inform the last & the next. A holistic and heuristic approach that makes sense and thus creates the relationships needed for pure understanding and behavioral change. As it is structures that arrive out of content and not content out of structures. Use design methodologies as models for every subject, designs investigative nature can change habits, neurons, & ultimately lifes.
ABSTRACT heurism over didacticism is the key, children need to find out for themselves WHY food is important. experiential based exercises shall facilitate the theory. Every subject in collaboration with industry leaders shall create a food themed curriculum based on foodstuffs. offer further reading & exploration. chefs to theologians to Olympic nutrition experts to nasa scientists.Take ubiquitous household foodstuffs & meals as case studies / narratives from subject to subject food testing > cooking > research>growing> documentation>facebook?

FACILITATION supermarkets bbc local garden growing projects small hold rearing projects farmers chefs designers local food businesses tail to nose approach facebook

SUMMERY local national & international collaborative effort complete cultural saturation
this whole process needs to designed to an intensely interactive dimension, documented traced experimented and developed into a scaleable project that interlinking theory/practice/behaviour what do you think?

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DeletedUser

The Food Curriculum !
To curate a short term program spanning over every school subject/discipline where every class shall inform the last & the next. A holistic and heuristic approach that makes sense and thus creates the relationships needed for pure understanding and behavioral change. As it is structures that arrive out of content and not content out of structures. Use design methodologies as models for every subject, designs investigative nature can change habits, neurons, & ultimately lifes.
ABSTRACT heurism over didacticism is the key, children need to find out for themselves WHY food is important. experiential based exercises shall facilitate the theory. Every subject in collaboration with industry leaders shall create a food themed curriculum based on foodstuffs. offer further reading & exploration. chefs to theologians to Olympic nutrition experts to nasa scientists.Take ubiquitous household foodstuffs & meals as case studies / narratives from subject to subject food testing > cooking > research>growing> documentation>facebook?

FACILITATION supermarkets bbc local garden growing projects small hold rearing projects farmers chefs designers local food businesses tail to nose approach facebook

SUMMERY local national & international collaborative effort complete cultural saturation
this whole process needs to designed to an intensely interactive dimension, documented traced experimented and developed into a scaleable project that interlinking theory/practice/behaviour what do you think?

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DeletedUser

You can blame it on fast food, school meals or even bad parenting. But when you really think about it, I think it really has to do with how American homes are so spread out compare to other developed countries. American homes are too spread out to even make a community. It is not just the fact that driving everywhere is making people fat, I genuinely think, it's the lack of accessibility to the local grocery store that's causing many problems. Even for me, it is so hard to find the time to go to the grocery (when I have a supermarket just down the block in NYC). Think about coming back from work, get on the car, run around in the gigantic supermarket, come back, make food, and clean up. that's a lot of work to do compare to for people who lives in the city where you have some access to the grocery within walking distance.

And because adults don't want to go back and run around in the massive supermarket, they buy many things without planning, food that last which must have preservatives and more carbs than vegetables (because vegetables die quickly), and this makes adults and kid's diet very limited.

There's no doubt that home economics in school education will help kids to learn about food. But at the end of the day, their parents need an easier access to the grocery store that sells raw food. Organic or non-organic to even begin with.

American people are fat (i don't like to generalize...but com'on) and their cultural eating habits are created because of this. It's not that people in Tokyo exercise more, I know people who sits in front of the computer all day but they're still not obese. They sure are not healthy but they do have easier access to variation of food.

That's been said, instead of 1 gigantic super market in the neighborhood, it makes more sense to have 3 smaller supermarket in a neighborhood. The closer, the better because you are more likely to go back for raw food. Accessibility comes first, then comes education. I'm no expert on this issue...but at least that's what I think.

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DeletedUser

I believe there are a lot of great ideas in all the previous posts, but the root cause of our problem is ourselves...the adults. We lead our children by the hand to their own demise by taking them to fast food joints and restaurants that boast of their ridiculous sized salads and sandwiches. Low income families know nothing but survival and convenience. It is up to foodies, nutritionists, restaurateurs, and chefs alike to figure out more ways to convince adults they are poisoning their own children. We need to take a stand to the brain washing commercials, toxic visual pollution of savory poisons, and wall-to-wall isles of chemical that present themselves as healthy and delicious meals. After 34 years of being poisoned by my parents and poisoning myself, I have realized there is a better way. Trust me, I love to eat and hate to exercise, but realizing that both go hand-in-hand did not make the connection for me until last year. I propose we all become good citizens for our communities and start demanding fresher products from our grocery stores. Stop the purchasing of junk food and the creation of new poisonous treats. Don't be tricked by healthy alternatives that have to use chemical to create flavor. Learn to live simple and love freshness. Demand the world to change. We, the consumer, has the power to control the supply and demand. We just need to learn to use that power.

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DeletedUser

This competition needs to be put out to young kids (influential ones) who understand their peers better than us adults. Why?

I think the key is for kids to empower other kids to eat Fresh Food. Trends are created by watching close friends. My circle of friends all have the same "look". My fashion and style (In regards to clothing) today and since I was a kid is and was based on the friends around me.

I don't think celebrity impact has a big push as they did 20 years ago or even 10 years ago because they have been saturated in so many markets. While one celebrity might endorse Fresh Food, another might endorse something unhealthy, so it becomes a zero sum outcome. If the homecoming king/queen or basketball team were known to be a health freaks eating Fresh Foods, it might create a trend.

I'm not a marketer, I'm a Financial Analyst at a Hospital, so this might sounds crazy: For years we have gone with our parents to a Grocery Store, it literally sounds boring, Why not create a new name for "Grocery Store". Ask cool kids what they wish "grocery store" should be renamed and put it into the oxford dictionary eventually.

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DeletedUser

To take this a step further, we should also educate children (and their parents) about the dangers of GMO's (Genetically Modified Organisms)/Bio-Engineered crops and foods. Gone mostly under-cover for the past decade, now Americans and others are seeing evidence of the dangerous effects of consuming these foods. On our blog, we have posted one of the more comical videos from Free Range Studios. Something along these lines might get the attention of the younger viewers.

http://gmofreeworld.blogspot.com/2010/06/store-wars-video-must-see.html

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DeletedUser

I could agree with Helga Mueller that the effort a famous cartoon charactor could make is great. We can see the example of Popeye and spinach.

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DeletedUser

I have been teaching kids cooking classes for several years now while getting my Masters in Nutrition. I never get preachy with the kids but always teach them healthy recipes and introduce them to knew foods. Because of my easy-going approach they really do try the veggies I put in front of them. I also think that they listen to me because of my age -- I'm in my early 20s and I think they look at me like a big sister. From my experience I think there's a lot of potential with setting up role models for kids to teach them better eating habits. So here's my idea: Provide training for teenagers to teach cooking classes featuring fresh produce in elementary and middle schools. All ages will benefit from this and it will teach the teenagers leadership skills as well. The younger ones will listen because they naturally look up to the older kids. Please contact me and I will be happy to go into greater detail for this project.

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DeletedUser

One idea might be to expand and develop the classic "lemonade stand" idea to other food. If kids can learn how easy it is to make money from good, fresh food then they will continue to be interested in food, and the business of food, as they grow up.

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DeletedUser

Hey :) I agree with Molly Chester.Iam a Kindergarden teacher myself, and I know that if children get to make food themselves, they for sure will taste and eat it too.I think its very important to create a good food culture.It must start in the early years and not first when the kids start in school,,,it must start in(Kindergarden)There could be some kind of "keypersons" connected to the Teachers in Kindergarden/school for support about teaching,new ideas a.s.oBut the nost important thing is IT HAS TO BE FUN TO COOK :)The Children should receive good teaching and advice about good food! I think its wrong to focus to much on the negative and bad health& foodstuff!! Let them experiment,and learn by using their coriosity.. This will raise the taste experience...I also agree with the mediastuff could be great!!! I know many young people starting making good food because they Identify with a sweet young guy called *Jamie Oliver* ;) Give the Children insight,
maybe they could sow,plant foodstuff in kindergarden themdelves. Herbs maybe....its about making them curios ,so that they want to experience. A few thoughts from Denmark ..




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DeletedUser

Hey :) I agree with Molly Chester.Iam a Kindergarden teacher myself, and I know that if children get to make food themselves, they for sure will taste and eat it too.I think its very important to create a good food culture.It must start in the early years and not first when the kids start in school,,,it must start in(Kindergarden)There could be some kind of "keypersons" connected to the Teachers in Kindergarden/school for support about teaching,new ideas a.s.oBut the nost important thing is IT HAS TO BE FUN TO COOK :)The Children should receive good teaching and advice about good food! I think its wrong to focus to much on the negative and bad health& foodstuff!! Let them experiment,and learn by using their coriosity.. This will raise the taste experience...I also agree with the mediastuff could be great!!! I know many young people starting making good food because they Identify with a sweet young guy called *Jamie Oliver* ;) Give the Children insight,
maybe they could sow,plant foodstuff in kindergarden themdelves. Herbs maybe....its about making them curios ,so that they want to experience. A few thoughts from Denmark ..




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DeletedUser

Hey :) I agree with Molly Chester.Iam a Kindergarden teacher myself, and I know that if children get to make food themselves, they for sure will taste and eat it too.I think its very important to create a good food culture.It must start in the early years and not first when the kids start in school,,,it must start in(Kindergarden)There could be some kind of "keypersons" connected to the Teachers in Kindergarden/school for support about teaching,new ideas a.s.oBut the nost important thing is IT HAS TO BE FUN TO COOK :)The Children should receive good teaching and advice about good food! I think its wrong to focus to much on the negative and bad health& foodstuff!! Let them experiment,and learn by using their coriosity.. This will raise the taste experience...I also agree with the mediastuff could be great!!! I know many young people starting making good food because they Identify with a sweet young guy called *Jamie Oliver* ;) Give the Children insight,
maybe they could sow,plant foodstuff in kindergarden themdelves. Herbs maybe....its about making them curios ,so that they want to experience. A few thoughts from Denmark ..




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DeletedUser

Hey :) I agree with Molly Chester.Iam a Kindergarden teacher myself, and I know that if children get to make food themselves, they for sure will taste and eat it too.I think its very important to create a good food culture.It must start in the early years and not first when the kids start in school,,,it must start in(Kindergarden)There could be some kind of "keypersons" connected to the Teachers in Kindergarden/school for support about teaching,new ideas a.s.oBut the nost important thing is IT HAS TO BE FUN TO COOK :)The Children should receive good teaching and advice about good food! I think its wrong to focus to much on the negative and bad health& foodstuff!! Let them experiment,and learn by using their coriosity.. This will raise the taste experience...I also agree with the mediastuff could be great!!! I know many young people starting making good food because they Identify with a sweet young guy called *Jamie Oliver* ;) Give the Children insight,
maybe they could sow,plant foodstuff in kindergarden themdelves. Herbs maybe....its about making them curios ,so that they want to experience. A few thoughts from Denmark ..




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DeletedUser

How about a comic or TV series with a popular character, who wins its energy and beauty from quality food, a 'Hannah Montana' based on food and where the weaker parties have problems caused by junk food. Kids like to follow idols so why not one who is 'in' by eating healthy.
And make it part of the kids education to let them plant herbs and vegetable in flower pots at school, where they will have to look after their plants and see how things develop and use/cook them later.

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DeletedUser

How about a comic or TV series with a popular character, who wins its energy and beauty from quality food, a 'Hannah Montana' based on food and where the weaker parties have problems caused by junk food. Kids like to follow idols so why not one who is 'in' by eating healthy.
And make it part of the kids education to let them plant herbs and vegetable in flower pots at school, where they will have to look after their plants and see how things develop and use/cook them later.

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DeletedUser

The problem with processed food I think can be likened to our war on drugs. Do we attack from the problem of supply (large corporations making unhealthy food) or demand (kids really liking processed food)?

I think this challenge correctly attacks the issue of demand and getting kids to make the healthy choice. I seriously doubt the corporations will walk away from profits. They follow what people want since that's where the money is.

I think we need to fundamentally think of solutions that will enact cultural/mindset change rather than a behavior change or knowledge exchange. For example, our fast food culture is partly responsible for where we are now with food.

Is there a way to infuse a culture that's not hostile to food that's healthy in the home and school? Solutions that alters the way we treat food, the speed at which we live our lives and makes it easy to make healthy choices since it's already part of a new lifestyle.

Or if that's too much for the scope of this challenge do we try to fit solutions into the fast food culture already in place? Healthy, unprocessed food that's just as or even more convenient, easy, tasty and quick than processed food? I think we need to think about it from a market perspective for this approach. Only a small % of people do the right thing because it's the right thing. Otherwise we'd all have solar panels on our homes and riding bicycles to work. Our solution for this approach has to be just as competitive or probably way more attractive alternative than what's available to kids today.

Just trying to frame the challenge in my mind before thinking of solutions.

Thoughts?

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DeletedUser

Partner with the Square Foot Gardening Foundation. I recently moved into a town home with my kids after years in an apartment and no space to grow anything and we put a square foot garden in our backyard and the kids loved it. From start to finish they were very excited about the whole process and loved eating the produce we got out of the garden. It is quick, cheap and easy to start and maintain a square foot garden so no better way that I can think of to get kids excited about vegetables. (and no, I do not work for the square foot garden foundation! : ))
Jason

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DeletedUser

I believe someone else brought this idea up already but I think if we change the grocery store experience it could have a lasting effect on kids and adults. Most kids experience the grocery store at an early age because their parents can't leave them at home unattended. Yet when they grow older they typically stay out of grocery stores altogether and rely on fast food and food in the fridge. If we make the grocery store experience more engaging then we can take the chance to educate the kids and parents. Whole foods and Wegman's have dinning areas where people can sit and eat in the store which is one step to engage a customer more. But what if cooking and gardening classes were offered which in some stores they are. I'm not sure this is possible but what if the produce section mimicked a garden where you actually selected your items right from the source. Either way I think the grocery store experience could be updated to better serve clients in educating them about food and cooking.

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DeletedUser

Kids hearts and minds are largely influenced by the media. If we could get some media execs (and their children) on our side there might be more food-related content in kids' programming, and more incentive for young people to start watching serious cooking shows.

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DeletedUser

In the United States and Canada, the children's program, Sesame Street, would be a good place to teach children about the benefits of fresh food and learning how to cook.

In a per-capita table of types of foods by year (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service), it shows a 26.6% increase in per-capita "fats and oils" consumption between 1995 and 2000.

It also shows 8.8% increase in per-capita "caloric sweeteners" consumption between 1990 and 1995.

It shows there was a 42% increase in U.S. per-capita chicken consumption between 1990 and 2005. Other meat consumption stays relatively steady.

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0104742.html


It looks like it could have been an increase in consumption of some common processed food that everyone was buying. Specifically, it looks like that food could be deep-fried chicken nuggets and some other breaded chicken products.

Chicken nuggets are usually consumed with a sauce containing sugar. Because of the release of insulin in response to sugar, you tend to eat more food when eating sugar with other foods.


http://www.lavidalocavore.org/diary/3230/soda-consumption-vs-diabetes

http://maps.ers.usda.gov/FoodAtlas/


The Food Atlas provides a good visualization showing the correlation between increased soda consumption and increased diabetes and obesity.

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DeletedUser

For little kids, one way to promote fruit and veg is to really integrate it into their daily lessons, with their other subjects. Have real fruits and veg in the class, so kids can touch it, smell it, identify it, spell the name, spell the color, draw it. Talk about what it feels like to the touch. Is it heavy, light, curly, straight, bumpy, smooth? What other fruit/veg are that colour?

Could have charts in the classroom with each kid's name and a space for building a rainbow, through eating one food of each colour. Each rainbow built, that kid gets a prize.

I disagree with the idea of an after-school program. Kids, once they reach age 12, HATE to stay after school. It has to be part of the regular curriculum- something integrated into their school day. Maybe part of gym class, health class, or lunch?

A school garden would be fantastic. Kids could taste what they grow and really get in touch with where food comes from. It gives kids a chance to get outside and work with their hands a bit too.

I grew up eating fresh food, because my Dad made it. We had no white bread, microwave dinners, tater tots. Maybe an evening event a couple of times a month, where, instead of making dinner at home, parents can bring their kids to the school and take part in a cooking class, while after, everyone stays and eats the meal they cooked. Then they can make those meals at home too.

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DeletedUser

I'm lucky enough to have my daughter in a school that has PE, a garden and a no-sugar policy. She knows all about red, yellow and green-light foods. We never eat fast food. We have our own garden. But yet we still struggle to get a variety of fruits and veggies in our diets. She loves to cook. I love to cook, but don't have the time for much more than the basics.

I find the hardest part of cooking is planning and shopping. How can we make slow-food, convenient?

Parents have to be involved and provide a good example, what ever happens in the school needs to come home as well. What's the loop between garden, home and school?

As Stephen points out, there is much to learn through cooking. Schools don't have funding for extra classes but perhaps there are existing subjects that can use cooking as a hands n teaching method - or even cooking homework!

How can we make the benefits more tangible? Eating well= feeling good?

What about labels on food? Do these make any sense to kids?

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DeletedUser

Large scale of educational campaigns all over the state will be a starting point, the change need to come from many industries and people in our society. I'm a strong advocate for our children, after all, the future belong to them. Kids learn from other kids, kids are smarter than their parents, they see things different than us, and can solve problems in many creative ways. I think we should bring them to the 'table' and hear what they have to say. As parents, educators and creative people, we should give them the power and the respect as members of society. We need to introduce the problem is a way they can understand it, and I know we will be surprise by their creative force.

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DeletedUser

I recently enrolled my 7 yr old son in a short summer camp at a local cooking school. His new found excitement around real food is powerful and refreshing. Contrast this against the school system that reduces meals and snacks to a question of efficiency and speed, and it is easy to see how even well-intentioned families fall into unhealthy (read: packaged/processed) options.

Real food takes time, but that isn't a bad thing. Recipes teach culture, math, planning, science, health, and even the fringe benefit of enjoying failure and learning from it.

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DeletedUser

I agree with Ivan's comment. We need to get to the source, and that starts in home and in the classroom. In order for us to educate our children about healthy choices we first need to educate ourselves. It's silly to expect them to change their habits if we can't do it ourselves.

Also, I know we live in a grossly capitalistic society, but how about we limit the unhealthy options out there for people in general, kids especially, and make healthy options more affordable? Why does it have to be that the largest percentage of diabetics in this country are those who live in poverty? I mean you can make food look as cool as you want, have all the hottest celebrities making kids dying to try it, but if their family can't even afford it then it's not going in their lunchboxes.

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DeletedUser

I agree with Ivan's comment. We need to get to the source, and that starts in home and in the classroom. In order for us to educate our children about healthy choices we first need to educate ourselves. It's silly to expect them to change their habits if we can't do it ourselves.

Also, I know we live in a grossly capitalistic society, but how about we limit the unhealthy options out there for people in general, kids especially, and make healthy options more affordable? Why does it have to be that the largest percentage of diabetics in this country are those who live in poverty? I mean you can make food look as cool as you want, have all the hottest celebrities making kids dying to try it, but if their family can't even afford it then it's not going in their lunchboxes.

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DeletedUser

I'm a private chef, and I have seen kids eat what they make a million times over. If they won't eat it, get them to cook it. Then, they will. We all kinda know this, so what do we do about it? Cooking Classes (Home-Ec) in the school sounds great, but the implementation of it feels so LONG. As a bridge to that step, what if there were a team of Inspiring Chefs/Educators in each state that rotated through the schools on a weekly basis. All coordinated under one umbrella country-wide organization that helps to coordinate content. They could put on food related assemblies for the kids, cooking classes after school for a week, talk with the lunch staff about how to take baby steps, meet with the parents of the community - generally just stir things up a bit, offer inspirational ideas, get people thinking and locate the advocates who can carry the torch. Then move on to the next school. In the meantime, hopefully the ever-increasing focus on this vitally important topic will start the movement in the state curriculum and beyond.

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DeletedUser

City Sprouts of Cambridge, MA (http://www.citysprouts.org/) now has gardens in all the middle schools of the city. You can solve all the world's problems in a garden and teach many lessons, not only about food, there. However, the principal lesson is the taste difference between fresh and bought. Every school should have a garden that the children and teachers can learn from.

Baltimore, MD's public school system is very committed to the idea of fresh, local foods for their students and is also a useful model.

Extend this idea even further with permaculture, planting perennials like raspberry bushes and fruit trees. Earthworks (http://www.earthworksboston.org/) is a Boston organization that plants, prunes, and protects urban orchards.

Connect the schools with organizations like the Chefs' Collaborative (http://chefscollaborative.org/) could also help to introduce cooking to the classroom as well.

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DeletedUser

My idea may not be so much raising or educating kids on the benefits of health for children but more getting kids excited about fresh fruit and veg.

Eatable playground - A section of the play ground that has plants that can be eaten and that kids can actively participate in growing fruit and veg. make in inter class competition for growing the most or largest fruit and veg. The anticipation of something that you have nurtured will get kids excited about the end result....fruit....salad...etc

Fruit salad play ground - make the play ground have shapes of food, banana shaped slide or straw berry hut with textile features to play with and they smell like the fruit.

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DeletedUser

I still believe in FLAVOR!!!..If we bring delicious meals made off with fresh food vs. other meal with not fresh food (frozen for example) and you make them taste both...you will capture their attention...they will feel and taste the difference...But working first in the flavor...THE WILL KNOW what are you talking about...Then you can support this idea with many things...like programs, education, books, marketing marketing...marketing...but first you must convince them...
I have two kids...11 years old and 7 years old...I have been used many ways to convince them WHY is the fresh food important (for your health, for your brain, to be stong, handsome, etc)....but the only one it works is if I make something delicious (home made, vegetables, fresh food) then the will eat it all WITHOUT ANY PROBLEM!..

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DeletedUser

There was a campaign done to promote fruit and vegetables back in the nineties. A group of people came up with the idea of introducing the "Fru-gies" (a knock off of the Fugies). It was wildly popular and the sales of fruits and vegetables increased. To target children, the plan needs to be something "hip & cool" without having a popular celebrity come out and say, "Eat your fruit."

One option is to sponsor challenge cooking shows on kids networks. Imagine if there was an Iron Chef type show for kids on the Disney Channel, Nickelodeon, or any other one? Kids could cook off against celebrities, athletes, or each other. The ingredients every week had to be healthy and the meals had to include a salad, or a vegetarian dish, the rules of course could be changed. This way kids can watch it, learn some neat recipes, but it's also on a network children are familiar with. I am positive that there are kids out there who would love to have a cook off against the Jonas Brothers.

What about having some sort of interactive activity that will inspire children to start eating healthy? It could even be tailored to fit age and need. For boys, you could have some sort of spy hunt, (think Where in the World is Carmen San Diego) and for girls it could be something about a princess- Not saying that a boy wouldn't want to do the princess one, or a girl wouldn't want to do the spy one. But basically, characters and people could make a game or adventure that will open up kid's eyes to see different types of fruits and veggies. Everyone knows about apples, but do a lot of kids know about star fruit? By incorporating new, healthy foods into an adventure, or a game based on characters will begin to install healthy eating habits.

I see it like this: a lettuce company wants to market to kids. They create a website dedicated to a particular theme. When the lettuce is purchased, maybe some code comes on the price tag, and that unlocks clues in some sort of online adventure, all about being healthy.

The key is be interactive, and children will enjoy it. Don't try to make whatever you decide to do more than it is because that is how children will be turned off to it.

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DeletedUser

How we might raise kids' awareness of the benefits of fresh food so they can make better choices? Through images and having fun. How about a contemporary superhero who gets his/her power through good food? The superhero could have a show, action figures, and interactive games along with branded foods in the grocery store. He/she would have to be truly hip, and not just on a mission to educate about eating healthy foods. In Brazil, Globo TV uses its telenovelas to share lessons with viewers who live in favelas. One example shared with me was a show in which a character who lived in a favela boiled water before drinking it. It wasn't an overt part of the story line, it was just woven into the action to display an important behavior for residents of favelas. (By the way, many people living in the favelas have a TV so the message does get to the intended audience.)

As for the fun, involve children in meal preparation. I have three nephews and no children of my own. I visited the nephews recently, and tried to help out my sister-in-law for a bit by watching the two older ones (ages 5 and 2) and preparing dinner one evening. I wasn't sure how to keep the kids entertained and cook at the same time, so I just gave them corn to shuck and instructed them to remove every single strand of silk. I enrolled them in the shucking clean up too. This is time consuming for a 5- and 2- year-old, and safe. It actually bought me time to get other parts of the meal ready, and they were having fun on their project. We had sauteed tomatoes, okra, corn, zucchini, and eggplant over spinach pasta with some cheese sprinkled on top. They asked me the names of the veggies they didn't recognize as we prepared together. My heart melted when the 5-year-old thanked me for "making such a nice meal." I am sure some busy families couldn't do this everyday, but working it in when possible makes a difference. The boys wanted to wear aprons to match their Tia. The two-year-old was eating raw sliced tomatoes from the counter. I was shocked. The five-year-old got a star on his "good behavior" chart for the day under the category of "eating his vegetables." By the way, I am not a cook and there was no recipe for this meal. I know how to boil water and sauté - that's about it. Sometimes it's just about doing and figuring things out as you go. You don't have to spend a ton of time preparing.

A couple more thoughts on images - what do our insides look like when we eat poorly? Could such images become a PSA campaign directed toward children? Also, what about constantly showing children colorful meals? A "rainbow meal" campaign? A variety of colors usually means a variety of nutrients and food groups

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DeletedUser

I think the first of all is the FLAVOR!!!...because they are kids and if you want to take their attention...MUST TO taste good!...after they ask what it is...I think after that you can explain why is important, the benefits of it...etc...Plus with parents, book, tales, videos, dvds, tv programs, education...etc..

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DeletedUser

I struggle with this every day with my own 10 and 12 year olds. One important factor has been the availability of cooking classes at a nearby organic farm. I also credit my kids kindergarten teacher for introducing them to cooking as a creative activity. Maarten Oonk has a great suggestion here about rewarding creativity with food through contests. Oh, I also got rid of our television - that has helped tune down the barrage of counterproductive messaging. But they did see a few of the documentaries on sustainable agriculture around now, on DVD. That turned them off to factory food immediately. My long-term challenge is to break the hold of high-fructose corn syrup on them - it appears to be powerfully addictive! Getting the adults who are major figures in my kids life, myself included, to set a good example is a big challenge. They aren't going to make healthy choices we don't make ourselves.

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Farmers'/ Food markets - Change the experience of obtaining food.

The atmosphere of shopping in a Supermarket where fresh foods are as far out of context as packaged ones is very different to that of walking around a market where you're buying food from the grower. We all lead lifestyles where rushing round the supermarket in between work and home life is just another chore, and kids trailing along behind the trolley are not going to connect products with places in this routine. If we can make food markets more accessible, and possibly more frequent, in our communities then suddenly food shopping becomes a family outing and kids can talk to growers about their produce, what it is, where it comes from and what you do with it. Personally I find shopping at farmers' markets to be a very enjoyable, and relaxing! experience.

Perhaps we could even go so far as to start food markets aimed at familys and children, with an emphasis on education as much as selling.

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DeletedUser

Education is key. Kids need and want to know "why?" they should do something or change their behavior. They need to be shown "why" in a manner that is easy to understand and engaging to their age level, accessible and practical, and in a way that employs an understanding of how children learn. Most importantly there needs to be a way for kids to choose healthy options for themselves after seeing the cause and effect of healthy versus unhealthy eating.

Education through interaction is the best way to spark interest, engage, and educate kids—which can lead to a long-lasting behavior changes

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DeletedUser

To make children understand and believe in the importance of healthy eating, parents, schools and government should be involved. Children are a reflection of everything they learn (explicitly or not) and therefore are a product of their environment.

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DeletedUser

I think there are two fronts to approach raising kids awareness of fresh food and making better choices:

1. Improve our food culture. Families need to cook more meals from real food and eat together, rather than opening a frozen, pre-made meal and heating it or going through a drive-thru. Doing this even a couple times a week will have an impact. It doesn't always have to be dinner, family breakfast or lunch works just as well.

2. Make food information more accessible through schools, food pantries, farmers markets, etc. Not nutrition labels, food pyramids, or food industry claims, but real information about what is in food, where it comes from, and how what your food eats and how it's prepared effects consumers and their health. Simple messaging, charts and imagery.

People need more information about how cooking can be simple and doesn't always require tons of ingredients and cookbooks. People of lesser means aren't always able to access the Internet to research food and get current nutrition news. But yet, they are often at the highest risk of childhood obesity.

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DeletedUser

I realize I'm not actually addressing the question that's been asked but ... I have one more thing to add ... 'Better Packaging' ... I don't think I'm alone on this ... I 'FEEL' better buying products in 'sturdy' packaging.

"Fresh Foods" are often just left out in the open for anyone to do anything to. (Don't get me started on the years of news stories about dangerous pesticides) However when I buy a soda for instance ... it comes in a metal can and I 'FEEL' safer because of it.

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DeletedUser

In the U.S.; The problem is capitalism. In a nut shell; The "Fresh Foods" companies need to streamline and be more competitive.

Start with better marketing (Sorry Jamie, but McDonald's doesn't sell hamburgers by telling us we're all going to die if we don't eat them ... Guilt is just not a good marketing tool).

However, marketing can only do so much to build desire for your product so the next step would have to be finding a way to make "Fresh Foods" more affordable as well as "Fast and Easy".

I guess I'm saying you have to know your market. If you can compete with the Fast Food chains and/or you can make "Fresh Foods" as, or more, convenient and affordable than buying the frozen family size Encore Veal Parmigiana at the super market, the problem will begin to solve itself.

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DeletedUser

In the U.S.; The problem is capitalism. In a nut shell; The "Fresh Foods" companies need to streamline and be more competitive.

Start with better marketing (Sorry Jamie, but McDonald's doesn't sell hamburgers by telling us we're all going to die if we don't eat them ... Guilt is just not a good marketing tool).

However, marketing can only do so much to build desire for your product so the next step would have to be finding a way to make "Fresh Foods" more affordable as well as "Fast and Easy".

I guess I'm saying you have to know your market. If you can compete with the Fast Food chains and/or you can make "Fresh Foods" as, or more, convenient and affordable than buying the frozen family size Encore Veal Parmigiana at the super market, the problem will begin to solve itself.

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DeletedUser

The most important thing I think is to start as early as possible to get children's attention in what's hapening in the kitchen and where food comes from (apart from the supermarket). Helping out in the kitchen is as much fun as playing in the sand pit but than with real ingredients. Simple price contests like our local ice shop to come up with new tastes for icecreams will help as much as baking quiche and presenting it as pie's or cake.

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DeletedUser

A lot of kids do after school activities like sport classes, music classes etc. Why not offer cooking classes? I know a couple of kids who would love to do that. (I know a social project where kids travel around the world in their own city. They meet 3 other kids from different cultural backgrounds and the highlight of the days is cooking a characteristic meal for their country together.) These classes could be combined with a competition. A lot of kids like challenges (which has to do with learning and trying new things) and competitions. There are so many initiatives offering competitions for kids and they can receive an award or win something. Then there are these adult cooking shows: Who cooks best, wins. In the class could be different teams who get the same (fresh) ingredients and need to make something out of it. Doing that, the kids can be creative, learn which ingredients go well together (and which don't), try new things and maybe go home as winners. Which then might lead to: "Oh, I wanna do it again" or "Next time, I win!".
(Sorry for my German-English... Germish)

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DeletedUser

I love Peter Han's comments, but he left out one key group in the mix: Physicians. Most kids have annual physical exams. It is an opportune time to raise the awareness of parents... and to identify high risk children. Unfortunately, according to the literature, very few physicians do so.

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DeletedUser

We need a systemic solution. We need behavior changes in parents, teachers, role models, restaurants, policy-makers, food corporations, advertisers, etc. We also need goals, metrics, and meaningful consequences. This all sounds overwhelming. But we can take a system solution to a small community and pilot a systems approach there. We can then scale it to larger communities. So we need to identify a small town with a citizen base and leadership that really needs to make the move to fresh foods. Not just a desire to change for idealistic reasons, but an urgent need to change because the town's folks are dying from poor nutrition, poor health and their kids are following their footsteps. Look for this motivated town and pilot the change there to show what is possible.

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DeletedUser

We need a systemic solution. We need behavior changes in parents, teachers, role models, restaurants, policy-makers, food corporations, advertisers, etc. We also need goals, metrics, and meaningful consequences. This all sounds overwhelming. But we can take a system solution to a small community and pilot a systems approach there. We can then scale it to larger communities. So we need to identify a small town with a citizen base and leadership that really needs to make the move to fresh foods. Not just a desire to change for idealistic reasons, but an urgent need to change because the town's folks are dying from poor nutrition, poor health and their kids are following their footsteps. Look for this motivated town and pilot the change there to show what is possible.

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DeletedUser

Maybe showing them starving kids on the other side of the world and how pervert this is? And that their government subsidizes US produced food and stops the south from getting a fair share? Couldn't help but add this. Don't get me wrong, I've seen Jamie's talk and it was overwhelming - thanks!

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I agree that working with schools to expand agricultural practices, even in their lawn if in urban locations, would be of great help for the youth. If this is not possible, why not demand Nutrition be taught as mandatory in schools as well.It should not be only in Home Economics, or the schools that voluntarily give nutrition as part of their Physical Education class. Or at least field trips to local farms and/or volunteer programs inspired by the schools where kids learn to plant, harvest, and prepare the grown foods. It is that important.
I think if cafeteria food is supplied by local farms, at least the fruits and vegetables, the nutrient of the food will be far more than the current frozen food revolution. The quality of school food has declined tremendously, and the use of soy fillers and many artificial ingredients only adds to the problem. As far as taste goes, many kids complain of blandness, and I have heard plenty confess that the foods is old, including expired milk and other products. Many students also ask for salad bar of their will (even at a high price), and schools do not allow them to have any- mostly for teachers, and usually very small stands so they run out quickly. We could start there. Unfortunately, school staff will probably not invest more effort into innovative cooking (which would only increase the appeal factor of healthy foods); due to the lack of commitment, time and economy. It takes too much motivation, and most likely money for them to care. Very Sad really. Oh, Ban all drinks like Monster, from school grounds.

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DeletedUser

Turn the eating healthy movement into a fast food type of mentality.....so make it COOL to eat healthy food the same way the unhealthy fast food industry has done, get celebrities to start endorsing healthy food the same way they do with coke and pepsi etc - kids just want to be COOL that's all, convince them eating healthy IS COOL and u have got them in the palm of yr hands ;)

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DeletedUser

Agree with Deb G.

Cooking shows are mostly instructional (Step 1 , Step 2 and etc) and it is quite often catered to early adults or house wives. If there is a real cooking show that could use interesting muppet characters, (The Swedish Chef) or "cooking mama", I believe most kids will be entertained and they could learn something simple and useful.

I guess the challenging part is to give the kids the full responsibility to prepare a meal in an adult kitchen. Most of the cooking equipments are not designed for kids. If you have a complicated laptop for kids (100 dollar laptop), why not a kitchen? If there is a real working version of a mini kitchen from the Fisher & Price, it might get interesting. It will allow the kids to play, cook and learn. With safety in mind.

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DeletedUser

Maybe what kids need is to be taught at a younger age (as part of a school curriculum) how to prepare meals, whether it is something as simple as "Ants on A Log" (Peanut butter and raisins on celery sticks) to learning how to cut and prepare vegetables. Kids learn through doing and just teaching them about a tomato or learning how to grow a garden may not be able to sustain their attention span. Children also like to impress their parents by showing that they can do "adult things". They may feel more inspired to spend time in the kitchen with mom and dad and show them the things they learned in school which may inspire the parents to make healthier choices as well as shorten preparation time.

I also agree that television, internet and branding play a huge role in the issue. Maybe a show on teenagers preparing easy meals to have friends over? This is a really tough challenge, but definitely an exciting one!

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DeletedUser

Cooking shows are gaining popularity, but how many of them actually show children cooking? After watching "30 Minute Meals," my daughter was inspired (she was using the plastic food from her toy box and pretending to cook). She was given a RR's Kid's Cookbook for her 6th birthday along with chef's hat and apron. I had her pick out a recipe and we picked out ingredients together and I let her do everything by herself (as much as was safe). I had never been able to get my 3 children to eat broccoli in the past, but they all tried it and liked it! Of course, my son wanted to get in on the action and was creating all kinds of "interesting" recipes. My point is that children are inspired by what they see on TV. It may also be that parents are not educated well enough...heck..there are still some things in the produce section that I have never tried because I have no clue what to do with it. If it's easy enough for a kid to prepare it, then an adult could do it too! I understand that parents can get busy, but if your child is begging to eat broccoli then how can you NOT make time!

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DeletedUser

Educating parents was the old plan, and it hasn't worked...they know how to eat they just don't, or are too tired to force their kids to eat what the kids don't want to...if you want kids to make choices you need to trust them to make the choice and treat them like the little adults they are.

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DeletedUser

I find it interesting that the advertising field has paid the best designers and marketers to create campaigns for unhealthy food that make kids scream for them. (Have you ever taken a four-year-old to the store with you and not had them plead for some candy, cereal, etc. based on a cartoon character?) Why isn't there the same amount of money and effort applied to healthy foods? Now that's a challenge: how to make advertising for broccoli on saturday morning TV compete with Cap'n Crunch commercials and packaging.

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DeletedUser

It takes educating PARENTS on how much it really costs to prepare fresh meals everyday. That coupled with the extra time that it takes to prepare those meals is a huge turnoff for families where there is one parent or where both parents work full time. Between the amount of money it takes to get fresh, balanced meals and the time it takes to prepare them, people choose fast and convenient. It's going to take a gigantic shift in parent's thinking to do this. People who are really adamant about this cause need to take it out and teach it to someone else...show other parents how to prepare fresh, quality foods for the well being of themselves and their children.

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DeletedUser

Its not childrens awareness that this is trying to reach, its parents awareness. Heavily TAX unhealthy food, and subsidise small rural producers. Something similar to tabacco.

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DeletedUser

How about educating parents, teachers and school administrators? If we're looking for change, it has to come from a good place (forced won't work). We need our educators (yes, parents are educators too) to embrace the cause and become more than just a moving piece.

If we can get these people to change the way they think about food and then actually live the difference, we'd be making HUGE strides. From there, it's a question of allowing children to follow in their footsteps.

Kids, especially at a younger age, love to copy people they admire and believe it or not, they admire their parents and teachers although they don't always show it.

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DeletedUser

How about making it economically feasible for one parent to work only part time so they are able to stay home and COOK with their children? With both parents working from 8 to 6 it's impossible to do this... we would not eat until 8! Plus there is no time for talking to our kids about anything... much less how to make good food choices. It would also be nice if this kind of work had some Value for our society instead of being looked up on as "lazy".

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DeletedUser

Love the topic.

I am working on a similar concept in a project called the e-lunch which turns healthy eating into a game, for kids and for adults. I believe kids' education has to pass though their parents awareness and interest.

In my research I also found that the way food is cooked is a key for the kids to like/dislike it, as well as getting them involved in the chose-cook process.

Otherwise I think that new technologies provide a great platform for this sort of project.

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DeletedUser

What do you think, young people will appeal to:

'iPod' or 'mp3 player' ?
'Coke' or 'caffeinated drink' ?
'Starbucks' or 'coffee' ?
'Nike' or 'running shoe' ?
'BigMac' or 'some fresh food' ?

Young people strongly appeal to brands and as long as our children environment is penetrated by brand messages of fast food chains and convenience food it will be hard to achieve a change in eating habits by educational advertising ...

Imagine, building a strongly emotional and appealing brand around fresh food - or even better (and more cost effective), let an already established brand promote fresh food as it were a new product specially designed for our target group. How about 'Nike'? Eating fresh and healthy is a basic requirement of any of their testimonials ... for them, nutrition is quite as basic as a pair of running shoes - it's part of their 'tools' ... so let's make a product out of it.

I know that this may sound a bit of stupid on the first sight, but imagine Nike (or any other cool, sporty brand) selling carrots as 'Eye-Wear' or paprika as 'Power-Boosters' under the label of let's say 'NIKEfresh' ... could be funny, ey?

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DeletedUser

Idea for social movement: Make food wastage a crime

Background: supermarkets throw away tonnes of fresh produce: milk, fruit, veg, eggs, bread, meat (and their packaging) every day.

The idea
* lobby government to make food wastage a crime
* tax supermarkets for the food they throw away
* supermarkets to be forced to place their fresh produce stock data in the public domain

The opportunity:
* develop social projects that put food earmarked for the bins to better use e.g. cookery and food preservation classes

* supermarkets to reward customers with free or discounted produce to avoid food waste tax / penalties. Expect there'd be more than you see on the reduced to clear shelves

* food wastage taxes to be be invested in local and seasonal food projects / British farmer rebates (probably illegal in EU I know!)

* apps could be developed using the supermarkets fresh produce data feeds. These could let customers find anti-waste deals in their area and would allow food freshness / wastage to be visualised
 

 

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DeletedUser

It's a two step process:

1. Find a genuinely cool marketing scheme aimed at children that makes them want the good food, and will whine until parents buy it. (Like the latest-greatest toy effect)

2. Obviously, children don't grocery shop themselves, so you need to also market to the parents who actually buy the food and convince them to buy it.

I would say that typically people don't buy healthy food because it's more expensive and the average person is thrifty/cheap. Capitalism says that you need to make healthy food more economically viable to be successful.

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DeletedUser

It's a two step process:

1. Find a genuinely cool marketing scheme aimed at children that makes them want the good food, and will whine until parents buy it. (Like the latest-greatest toy effect)

2. Obviously, children don't grocery shop themselves, so you need to also market to the parents who actually buy the food and convince them to buy it.

I would say that typically people don't buy healthy food because it's more expensive and the average person is thrifty/cheap. Capitalism says that you need to make healthy food more economically viable to be successful.

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DeletedUser

Kids awareness is very hard to reach, but good design can help very much.

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DeletedUser

Take Kids on a journey: A tomato from its birth until the moment of SWALLOW ...
(Should feel like playing a tomato for one week or so – much more interesting than what it does to your heath in 10 years!)

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DeletedUser

Well the Fresh Food must be available to them throughout the day so they can eat it. So put Fresh Food everywhere around them! Otherwise they won't have any fresh food to eat so it won't matter anyway, right?

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DeletedUser

To awake interest I believe is one of the major factors for the elder kids. Kids love experimenting and are in general very curious. Get them to try and taste and ask them - what would be good together? Where does this food come from? How do you think this is produced?

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DeletedUser

Kids learn by observing, then doing If we the parents start by setting the right example maybe it's as good a place as any to start developing a new behaviour towards fresh is best.

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DeletedUser

This may seem obvious, but create children's cookbook with 5 minute or 15 minute recipes. This way they know it will be quick, you won't lose their attention, and they can discover the joy of cooking easily which makes moving up to longer and harder recipes into an organic process.

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Extremely hard challenge yet optimistic about it, changing culture it self. Increase awareness of the benefits of fresh food and help them make better choices through updating moral constructs.

Random thoughts:

• Kids eat the food provided for them by parents
• Kid demand food by taste, affinity and subjectivity
• Kids influence their parents on purchase or food preparation.
• Kids are exposed to new food products on a daily basis.
• Do kids understand the consequences of an unhealthy lifestyle?
• Do kids understand what fresh food means?
• What is the status of self-esteem?
• Government regulations on advertising targeting kids and influencing parents to purchase mass-produced products.
• Regulations are leverages to trigger change.
• More education for parent to properly stimulate healthy eating habits on their children.
• Parent opt for convince at the time of preparing food.
• Fresh Food is conceived as highly priced and time consuming.
• Educational requirements, Agro 101?

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DeletedUser

I think one of the keys to the learning process for young children is making farms more visible. They have to be brought into the urban environments and schools where the children live, as it's not always possible for the kids to go out into the countryside or to where food is grown. This could happen on a school-by-school basis or maybe through a shared allotment scheme, where several schools take part in maintaining a green space. Allotments could be sited on derelict buildings or even inside them (as long as they're safe), which might serve to make the area look and feel better.
Children generally seem enthusiastic about these kind of enterprises (if they're well organised) and it could be a good way for a community to improve their surroundings and also benefit and learn from those improvements.

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DeletedUser

Building on Jamie's kindergarten challenge to name different types of fruit and Vegetables I think that educating kids on what is locally grown and seasonal is a key issue. Kids love to see things growing, get their hands dirty, and harvest their own produce, and preparing it and cooking it is a next step. So lets get them growing things and teaching them about recipes using local produce, in the seasons that it is available... We have after-school clubs so why not a grow-your-own club sponsored by local businesses like garden centres?

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DeletedUser

I have noticed that my year-old daughter gets especially excited about food that comes from crinkly (noisy) packaging - the sound is stimulating, and she now associates that sound with food. I remember when she was newborn, the sound was VERY startling to her. Now it seems she's hard-wired to prefer food from packaging. That said, frozen veggies, lunch meat, and cheese are often in SOME kind of packaging, even if it's in the plastic bags that are used in the produce or deli section of the grocery store. Regardless, it seems that the auditory experience is just as powerful as vision, taste, and smell when influencing eating preferences.

Photo of An Old Friend

Amazing chalenge, idea, I sustain this also, and I always had, without a proper and healthy feeding process the kids they cannot focus on learning, and this is just one more thing that should give ideas!

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A strongly related challenge: even when kids know what choices they should be making, their environment may make the exercise of appropriate choices difficult if not impossible. For example, my wife runs an after-school program for about 100 kids living in the South of Market area in SF. While SoMa is highly gentrified, her kids come from working class and impoverished families. Parents of these kids are incredibly busy, often working 2-3 jobs just to get by. Decent but affordable food is difficult to find, and these parents probably don't feel they have the time or cash to leisurely browse the local Whole Foods in search of a perfect carrot. The corner liquor story is expensive but convenient while offering few healthy choices; other venues are cheap but crappy (while offering few healthy choices). The kids kinda know better... and they still eat really crappy food.

So, beyond AWARENESS of good choices, how might we improve ACCESS to healthy choices within the constraints of people's busy and difficult lives?

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Check out the slightly reworded challenge

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DeletedUser

I am thrilled to see this go live.

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DeletedUser

Exciting!

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DeletedUser

very cool. excited to start.

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I can't wait for this one to start!

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DeletedUser

This Yale press release describes a study that shows kids prefer sugar snacks with cartoon character packaging, but that the characters did not change their preference for veggies. (Not sure if Sponge Bob carrots were preferred to generic graham crackers.)
http://opa.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=7630

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DeletedUser

Great challenge... Jamies experiences with kids in the US are truly unbelievable: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGYs4KS_djg

Photo of Nathan Waterhouse

this is a very worthy challenge