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HPR Health: Health Profile Reporting [Updated 8/17/2015]

Every month, each person receives a report based on their purchases, that shows their general health, and what purchases to eliminate.

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Who is the target audience for your idea and how does it inspire the end user to lead a healthier life?

Advertised on TV to All Consumers. It inspires people because the report is sent to the Doctor, Family and Friends. It enables a physician to prescribe prescriptions (What to Add and What to Eliminate) for healthier eating. It provides optional restrictions at point of sale or surcharges to the consumer, retailer and supplier of unhealthy foods, commissions and bonuses to physicians for writing healthy prescriptions, as well as cash back/rewards to the consumer for eliminating unhealthy foods.

Sunshine goes to the local Supermarket and does her normal shopping routine. While at check out, she takes out her Visa Card or enters her PIN for her grocery card (If cash payer) with the new Health Profile Report (HPR) add on. 

Coca Cola is issued a health cost surcharge for all the soda Sunshine purchased. Phillip Morris is issued a health cost surcharge for the cigarettes she purchased. The retailer is also issued a surcharge for selling unhealthy foods. 

The surcharges are distributed to the government healthcare system managed by Medicare/Medicaid (Health Care for All). 

Sunshine's food purchase report is transmitted to http://www.nantworks.com/ NantHealth which then produces a report by comparing her health profile in real time to the current molecular science health standard. Her Doctor is also provided with Sunshine's (HPR) which helps her physician prescribe foods to Add/Eliminate from her diet. She agrees to stop buying the unhealthy items but due to their addictive nature she asks her Doctor to restrict purchases on the card for these items.The Doctor logs into the HPR system, and restricts all the unhealthy foods. 

Next week Sunshine visits her local Supermarket, purchases some restricted items like cigarettes and soda. These restricted items are visible on the screen, and she decides to pay the surcharges and purchase the restricted items. 

She later regrets buying these items because she knows they are not healthy, and  because she has less money to spend on her clothing due to the surcharges, so eventually she decides to give up the unhealthy items and her health profile improves.

Her physician receives a commission check for prescribing healthy foods from the HPR fund, and a bonus commission for helping Sunshine meet the healthy standard. Sunshine receives a credit cash back reward to her VISA Card for eating healthy, and because her health report is meeting the standard and contain s no unhealthy foods as per her Physician.  


What early, lightweight experiment can you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

Advertise on local television/internet and link up with Visa Corporation to develop the HPR application and start a pilot program of 100 consumers and physicians of all different backgrounds.

What skills, input or guidance are you keen to connect with from the OpenIDEO community to help you build out or refine your idea?

Visa IT Computer Scientists, Data Scientists, Healthcare IT Engineers, Physicians, Lawyers,Television/Internet Advertising and Marketing Professionals, NantHealth Executives, Insurance Company Executives, Minority Leaders, Government Officials.

This idea emerged from

  • An Individual

Does your idea currently have an Indiegogo campaign drafted?

  • No

Evaluation results

14 evaluations so far

1. Can you see this idea fitting into your daily life?

Yes, I think so - 21.4%

I'm not sure - 28.6%

No, I don't think so - 50%

2. Do you think this idea will help people lead healthier lives?

Yes, I think so - 14.3%

I'm not sure - 42.9%

No, I don't think so - 42.9%

62 comments

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Photo of An Old Friend
Team

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Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Hi Richard - Great work thinking through how to integrate purchasing and behavior and pull in health professionals. I look forward to seeing more of your ideas down the road!

Photo of Allen A
Team

Should we recruit friends/family to get more feedback?

Photo of Allen A
Team

Everyone - GREAT JOB!!!

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Hi Richard,

This is a compelling idea getting at the intersection of purchasing and behavior. A couple of thoughts come to mind:

<>Rather than involving a physician directly or providing them access, which might be hard to get set up and to keep in place, could you generate reports that the shopper can review with their doctor and then set up the purchase restrictions themselves?
<>Add an over-ride at the time of purchase. As someone echoed, if it is too restrictive, people will stop using it.
<+>For the lightweight prototype, you might start by interviewing people at grocery stores and ask a few questions, such as:
+I'm working on a program to help people lead healthier lives. Do you ever wish that you could block certain purchases?
+This is what I"m thinking of doing - does that sound like something you would use.

It would be great to get Visa to jump on board, but you'll need some data and proof-of-concept materials before they'll give you an audience.

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you and to answer your questions, please note the following:

The importance of involving the physician directly is for establishing truth and to insure the data is accurate. Of course its possible to offer many options but when dealing with people with food addictions, they are in no position to be relied upon. It also enables the shift from writing prescriptions for drugs and surgery to treat poor eating habits (i.e. Diabetes, Heart problems etc ...), to prescriptions for healthy eating, which instead of commissions for writing drug prescriptions, they get commissions for writing the healthy food prescriptions for their patients and monitor compliance. If successful, they get more commissions by reducing the health care costs related to poor eating habits.

Yes, The consumer will still have the ability to override at the point of sale. However they are surcharged, as well as the retailer, as well as the product supplier which goes into the Medicare/Medicaid system.

Here is an example of how big business can buy their science to ignore the truth about High Fructose Corn Syrup or the fact that they used to put Cocaine in Coca Cola.
http://www.inquisitr.com/2324062/coca-cola-promotes-exercise-to-combat-obesity/

Visa will jump on board once legislated as they want to make money off the transactions and surcharges. It makes no difference to them if a person buys Coca Cola or Natural Spring Water. Plus they will make additional transaction fees when transferring the money to the government.

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

There are a lot of dependencies to getting your full-fledged idea up and running, which will be a great moment, but before that, can you break it down into smaller implementation stages? For instance, a very early prototype would be to get a few friends or volunteers to partner with you, and set up restricted list for them, and you could be the 'technology' filter. This seems like one of the early proof of concept aspects of your idea - will people use a restricted list, how would they set it up, how does it help them? You can worry about scaling it with slick technology later.

Photo of Jon Cheng
Team

Hey Richard - thanks for adding me to your team here. This is the first team I've been part of, so when I saw the comment from Trevor, I thought it was an opportunity to help out.

In the past, I've written up some proposals such as the one that was suggested. I hope you don't mind that I've put together a first draft of how the prototype might look.

In summary, the pilot would take 4 months total and cost about $700. This would provide credit card transaction data for up to 100 testers and an additional layer of survey responses. This data would provide insight into whether the concept works and to what degree.

Here's the doc, feel free to edit and make your own: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1U1JTS2-HXHFer_0QbIgUZC-DCHT4HSRBNHPZl75QP-o/edit?usp=sharing

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you Trevor, Stage I would be working with VISA initially to generate a reporting engine similar to the monthly statement, and it would provide a Health Profile based on purchases.

This could also be communicated to the physician, which at the next physical examination, the physician would advise what purchases to eliminate and the physician would go into the HPR System Online and set up a Healthy Lifestyle Plan which would restrict unhealthy purchases. The user could override these at point of sale, however there are consequences via surcharges. VISA then transfers the surcharges to the US Government Medicare for All fund. The Physician receives a commission for prescribing the healthy plan, and subsequently receives bonuses based on the level of their patients compliance.

The restrictions list is created individually for each patient by the Physician while online in the HPR System. For instance, if the physician sees that you purchase 6 Liters of Coca Cola each week, he/she would select that item code and select restriction Qty = 1/Month.

Commercial Advertising will be purchased by VISA to advertise the new VISA HPR Card.

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Hi Jon - Nice work on the google doc. One observation is that I don't think the credit card statements are going to have the purchase details, it will just be the entire bill. So, you'll see $100 at Safeway, but it won't show what items were purchased.

Photo of Jon Cheng
Team

Thanks Trevor, hopefully it helps get this idea a little further ahead.

You bring up a really great point about the transaction details. From my experience, credit card companies simply aren't given the purchase details from merchants. Given how valuable purchase data is, I can understand why business would not share that data with a credit company. Mint.com for example, will categorize your spendings based on the merchant name. This would limit the logic behind the concept to encourage/discourage purchases at the vendor level.

If we were to challenge this limitation, I believe the options would be:
1. Manually have the person scan their receipt in via phone camera then process with OCR and such
2. Manually have the person indicate their purchases via an app
3. Work with stores to collect purchase details directly from them
4. Have the stores "do the math" and change the merchant name accordingly (e.g. "Safeway (a34)" means healthy purchases were made!)
5. Build a new payment processing system that collects line items on transactions

I'm really stretching it with some of those ideas (just to be thorough). I feel that really only #1 might be feasible if it was prompted only for certain merchants such as groceries stores while an inference is made for restaurants and others.

The merchant name may be all we will have to work with. From your point of view, how critical it is to solve that particular problem?

Photo of Richard
Team

Brilliant! A great starting document!

Photo of Alice
Team

Great ideas!! I think that your third suggestion would keep the customer journey really simple (and therefore encourage usage). Card companies do only see the total transaction amount and even retailers can't track customer behaviour easily due to customers using different cards/payment methods when they shop. Loyalty programmes are what allow retailers to track the exact products that customers purchase and they are increasingly offering bespoke deals based on specific information (although it is normally a 10% discount etc. given if a customer hasn't bought a particular product/brand in a while instead of an attempt to change customer behaviour in regards to health etc.) . If you had a partnership with a retailer then you could collect the information and support a 'healthy food loyalty programme' whereby customers receive more points/cashback for healthier options - With technology such as Apple Pay, payment could all be linked to an app where you could also track your eating habits? I'm guessing retailers could be in support of this seeing that people are now increasingly health-conscious, a customer-caring loyalty programme would provide a point of differentiation against competition and it would keep spend within their store? Customers would also most likely enjoy the gamification of eating healthily if the app were community-driven as well as the financial rewards from a retail partnership?

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Apple Pay - - that could be an interesting one to try to build a prototype around to see if the iOS / App technology would support it. But before building anything, my sense is some more potential customer interviews are in order :-)

Photo of Richard
Team

Great suggestions.... yes whatever works to achieve the objective. If that's VISA with a HPR Add On, Apple Pay or our own Visa HPR Debit Card, whatever works. I have added some photographs to illustrate the functionality.

Photo of Richard
Team

Yes...sounds interesting. Apply Pay, Visa HPR Debit Card, Square, whatever Widget works.

Photo of Allen A
Team

I'm a big fan of deep learning - big data and (4+ layer) neural networks as a means of (unsupervised) learning. Lots of (beneficial) discoveries have been made in healthcare, genomics, threat analysis, financial markets, etc.

Big data is required to do any type of deep learning.

Maybe too late, since there's only 3-4 days left in the refinement stage. What if the product was simply, contribute your purchase habits (anonymously), along w/ your health history/activity/lifestyle to benefit mankind. Maybe a "health report" is too ambitions, but simply giving personalized discoveries of the "deep learning" would be good enough for people to volunteer their data. For example, participants would receive a monthy: "we've discovered folks in your demographic were 10x more likely to have pancreatic cancer whenever they made a monthly purchase of X, Y and Z."

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you and sure that's a plausible and good concept, and if it were not for the addiction aspect of unhealthy eating, along with the marketing and advertising, a report showing demographics would be a total solution.

The United States is Obese and Unhealthy because of the addictive, and unhealthy nature of the processed foods. Like when Coca Cola used to put Cocaine in its soda, but now its High Fructose Corn Syrup which is more addictive. Or Tobacco and Nicotine. People know smoking causes Cancer. Its written on the package.... does that get them to stop? No.... By providing data via a report and providing optional restrictions at point of sale, and surcharging the suppliers and consumers as appropriate, at least we make them contribute to paying for Health Care, as financial penalties are a tried and true method of curving behavior> Using physician supervised education & food prescriptions/restrictions, reporting and surcharges, we can make that shift.

This is a great reporting idea and yes we can include it as part of the reporting profile each month as we already defined a report that makes a comparison to ones health as compared to the general population so people can see where they stand.

Photo of Allen A
Team

The deep learning suggestion was about discovering other relationships between food/activity/lifestyle (purchase) and health. There's potentially many orders of magnitude number of new discoveries that can be made in health. Our knowledge (of health) is naive... Meaning under these (laboratory/clinical, very controlled) circumstances we know X is bad. But what if X, is combined with T, B and F? Maybe it's not as bad for your health. Maybe, it's even good for your health.

The real world data has so many more variables that can affect a person's health ... and deep learning is the tool we can use to make many more discoveries than we can from a laboratory or clinical trial. The difference in data sets is many many many orders of magnitude (we're talking hundreds, maybe thousands of test subjects in clinical versus hundreds of millions of visa users), which means there potentially many many orders of magnitude of new insight / knowledge that humanity can gain.

Getting the data requires people to voluntarily/consent to have that data (purchase, health) analysed. Why would anyone share their personal/health info? They would have to have assurances that not only is it anonymous (De-identified), as well a secure/protected (sounds like HIPAA compliance), and they get some benefit....

Healthcare is a big deal in the us, in terms of focussed effort for business and technologist. So deep learning is already being applied, by startups like http://www.basehealth.com/ ... Adding purchase data, could potentially provide another level of insight, for doctors, scientist, consumers, insurance companies, etc.

Photo of Richard
Team

We are pursuing partnering with NantHeath, so as to centralize all possible data from the entire health care population so as science improves, becomes less naive, perhaps they will understand the combinations of food consumption that may not be as bad for health as opposed to if a person consumes only one type of unhealthy food. If a person has whole wheat, rather than processed white flour etc, we know that whole wheat is better because the combination of the wheat germ fiber shell prevents rapid digestion by the liver etc. So does that mean if they eat white flour with a high fiber vegetable, its the same result as if they ate whole wheat? Or if Pasta is consumed with red wine or olive oil, or a lot of unprocessed starches or fiber, its not as bad etc.... If these combinations are available, and scientifically proven healthy, sure, these combinations could be programmed into a physicians prescription process. Predominately , the culprits are the processed junk foods. The sodas.

The centralized database at Nanthealth will provide analysis which can recognize similar patterns or root causes for health issues outside of the genetic and food consumption spectrum. Geographic location (next to a toxic dump etc), all people with this type of cancer actually worked for the same Asbestos factory 20 years ago etc... Similar High stress careers.... , All smokers etc. A physician could actually write a prescription for you to relocate or change careers etc. Based on data....
Currently the only people who discover these patterns are the class action lawyers.

As far as privacy laws, HIPAA compliance would need to be complied with like you mentioned via anonymous card number or the like.

Photo of Allen A
Team

Data is already out there from hundreds of millions of people. I'm guessing we have credit card purchase data from the 80s... So 35 years of data.

Clinical trials account for 10's of variables (maybe), which again utilize hundreds (maybe thousands) of subjects. For the FDA, it's good enough to establish efficacy of drug, etc. For discovering insights/knowledge, it's not good enough.

What if there was a way to examine hundreds of millions of subjects, as well as, tens of thousands of variables, wouldn't that be better? We have a tool, "deep learning", as well as a lot of data (3 decades of purchase data from hundreds of millions), and a lot of compute resources (from Amazon, Google, Microsoft, IBM, etc) that can process all that data, to discover insights/knowledge on health. These insights can be used as starting points for researchers to investigate the science on why/how very complex interactions work. "Knowledge" even if we don't understand the science is still beneficial. Nobody understands (science of) gravity, and yet we still make use of it.

Photo of Richard
Team

Brilliant idea... we can import all historical purchase data that's already available! Makes total sense to utilize whats already available over a long period of time.

Yes Nanthealth is utilizing super computers and makes the analysis and the information can eventually with HPR be provided to physicians of whom during a physical can start writing prescriptions based on all of that knowledge and insight.

A patient may show that for twenty years they have been smoking or drinking 7 liters of soda a week etc and developed XYZ diagnosis. A patient with only one year of that consumption, can be flagged, and prescribed restrictions accordingly based on the deep learning.

Great idea!

Photo of Allen A
Team

This would only work if we have a lot of data ... meaning, we'd need a lot of people to volunteer their data (purchase history, health history, etc). Maybe we can do a kickstarter type of campaign, to see how many people would pledge their data. If we don't get enough people to pledge, then this is a non-starter.

Deep learning doesn't require a super computer, you can utilize a distributed platform. It mainly requires GPU's (not CPUs); GPUs do the required math much faster than CPUs. I think Amazon leases its 6000 total cuda core GPUs (g2.8xlarge $0.5271 per Hour); scale that out horizontally to crunch as much data as needed - 1000 of these boxes is 6M cores for $527.1 per hour! No supercomputer can compete with that price/performance.

What is needed is a person or two or three that knows deep learning :)

Photo of Neel Rajani
Team

I really like the idea of a kickstarter campaign to see the uptake for the POC...great idea!

Photo of Richard
Team

How about work with VISA and other BIG DATA firms to establish lists for Deep Learning.

Photo of Richard
Team

What is POC....

Photo of Allen A
Team

Big data just means "a lot of data" - all modern day companies have "big data", and probably do analysis on that data (because they want to be data driven). You don't necessarily need to hire a "firm" that specializes in big data to do big data analysis because it's essentially"statistics" - there are exception cases.

Deep learning is not as easily understood (as statistics), because often the results can't be explained (how an input results in an output) but we know that they're valid. Neural networks is still relatively new (field of study), and not something someone can easily pick up "with self study" (not impossible, but just hard). Here's an analogy I ripped off from I forget who: "Deep learning" is easy to understand like "how a rocket works", but not necessarily easy to do ... you need someone that understands 'rocket engineering.'

You'll need consent from individuals to gather purchase and health histories (data). Working w/ Visa would make it easier to get the consent/data. But you still need the individual to consent their health history to tie their purchase history to it.

Photo of Richard
Team

Yes, I think on the physician side, with Nanthealth collaboration, we could secure a consent from the patient.

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Hi Richard,

Here's a video link which might spur some additional ideas for you: "Chef Leah Sarris, program director at the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans, describes an innovative program for medical students focusing on the role of cooking and nutrition in health care."

http://www.healio.com/endocrinology/diabetes-education/news/online/%7B0b327280-6715-4850-94b0-77149898976f%7D/video-chef-integrates-food-and-medicine-in-promotion-of-cardiometabolic-health

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you for your contribution! Thats the IDEA! Culinary Medicine.

Photo of Trevor z Hallstein
Team

Oh, and here's some more info on Tulane's Teaching Kitchen which has a mission in line with some of the things you are trying to accomplish: "Through innovative nutrition curriculum and hands-on training in the culinary arts, The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University seeks to better prepare future physicians to serve and heal patients and communities."

http://tmedweb.tulane.edu/mu/teachingkitchen/

Photo of Richard
Team

Awesome! Culinary Medicine! Thanks for the contribution! Thats the idea!

Photo of Logan Powell
Team

Richard! I think you're gonna like this: http://iamdata.co/

Photo of Richard
Team

Brilliant!

Its actually one of their use cases ...

Healthcare
"Use our passive collection & aggregation of your customers purchase data to build the next generation of health care apps. Imagine what you could do with access month’s or year’s of your customer’s food purchase data. Start improving lives."

VISA, and the like, will likely be able to develop their own API, but if not, this sounds right on the money!

Thanks for the brilliant contribution!

Photo of Jon Cheng
Team

Hi Richard,

My first reaction to your idea was that having my credit card blocked would be off-putting. I have a flexible spending card that does to me much too often. Nonetheless, I kept reading and as I better understood the thought behind the idea, I became a fan.

You touched on this in your July 30 posting but I think that the "discounts and coupons" aspect has a ton of potential. Instead of punishing for bad purchase choices, consider rewarding for good choices via. cash back program. Cash back is already a widely adopted mechanism for many credit card options out there. I personally use Discover IT, which forces me to opt-in to quarterly rewards in specific categories such as "online shopping."

There is probably a great case around this model where you would be able to show that your card users have a higher likeliness to purchase products from certain "healthy" vendors due to the cash back. This in turn would allow you to secure some sort of deal with them to make the whole idea feasible.

Cheers,

Jon

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you Jon for your comments! As you illustrated, cash back rewards is already a widely adopted mechanism and although we still have a health care crisis, offering cash back rewards under the HPR system, is a great idea!

However due to the addictive nature of these foods, we need to issue surcharges and physician restrictions in addition to any cash rewards or discounts, to help combat this crisis. Its clear that there is a crisis, and the majority of people are falling victim to unhealthy foods even with cash rewards and coupons that are available already.

This is a problem that Louis Brandeis warned about many years ago. Consumerism. Among Brandeis's key themes was the conflict he saw between 19th-century values, with its culture of the small producer, and an emerging 20th-century age of big business and consumerist mass society.

As a result, he developed a hatred of advertising and a loss of respect for the average "manipulated" consumer. He recognized that a dependence by newspapers and magazines on advertising for their revenues caused them to be "less free" than they should be. And national advertisers further undermined the relationship between consumers and local businesses. He went so far, writes McCraw, as to "urge journalists to 'teach the public' such lessons as 'to look with suspicion upon every advertised article.'" (i.e. Cash Back Rewards)

But in general, Brandeis felt that consumers were becoming "servile, self-indulgent, indolent, [and] ignorant." The consumer, he said, "had abrogated his role as a countervailing power against bigness... He lies not only supine, but paralyzed, and deserves to suffer like others who take their lickings 'lying down.'" (We are Suffering as a culture now...) He was repelled by the flaunting materialism overtaking America, often denouncing conspicuous consumption. But by doing so, notes McCraw, "he drifted imperceptibly into an attack on consumer preference, a principle that lies at the very core of a market economy."

If you follow Brandeis, and become suspicious, in essence, they are surcharging you on the price anyways, or with hidden fees, and then making it appear like you are being rewarded. I bet if you really add up the numbers, you are not really getting anything for your cash back choices, and in the end, are actually paying more, by being encouraged to purchase things you wouldn't ordinarily purchase to get your rewards. With cash rewards, we are leaving the power in the hands of the food companies currently, instead of the physicians, which are controlled by the patient. If their health is not improving, they can switch doctors who can lay out a new plan for them. With cash rewards, we leave the power in the hands of big business...

The rewards program with the HPR model of surcharges and restrictions, inherently offers rewards immediately by not charging the consumer any surcharges for buying healthy foods, at the point of sale.

Your idea to include cash back is a very good idea and can be included in this effort for sure. The credit card companies can issue you your coupons on your card so the next time you go to the market, you get a discount.

If we can enable cash rewards based on what and individuals physicians are saying are healthy, for that particular individual, and the card rewards based on that model, we can circumvent big business's influence.

Today Physicians and health care is rewarded by prescribing more drugs to counteract the unhealthy purchases, but with the new HPR model, they are receiving the same economic model of rewards themselves. Not by prescribing all these drugs today, but by prescribing healthy foods. So instead of them receiving kickbacks for prescribing diabetes drugs, someday they will be receiving commissions from the surcharge fund for prescribing whole food purchases via HPR and keeping society healthy.

Photo of Chris Lee
Team

Thinking about ways to convert the negative into a positive while still drawing on the psychology that a loss gets our attention (and changes behavior) more than a gain.
What if you advance everyone a credit equal to the amount of heath care savings they would attain if they followed "healthy" behavior and then reduced that credit as they took unhealthy actions (to a minimum of zero)?
That way each unhealthy decision you make results in a visceral loss of something you already got.

Photo of Jon Cheng
Team

Chris - that's a great point.

To build on your line of thinking, after we calculate the credit based on the health care savings from healthy behavior, we may not need to actually credit in advance. (I imagine that actually advancing a credit may get messy from an accounting standpoint).

Instead, we just need to simply show how much cash back they could potentially earn and create the perception that they own that credit (to create that sense of visceral loss).

Then, every time the user choses to spend at an unhealthy vendor, that amount gets reduced. A text / email could be sent highlighting the reduction in credit to drive the point home.

For example: "Hey Ronald, Your last transaction at McDonalds has reduced your healthy choices bonus from $100 down to $93."

Photo of Karen Sorensen
Team

Hi Richard-
Congratulations on making it to refinement. I really like the profile that allows for the user and your care providers to provide health information and the data transfer that it allows.

I do have a few questions.

Since the majority of Latinos pay with cash how will you convenience them to change their happen habits to use a Visa card? I would think the first step would be to get our target population Latino's under the age of 30 to start using Visa cards, instead of penalizing them for using the cards.

I have to say when I first read this it came to my mind the Wisconsin bill that (if enacted as law) would bar food stamp (a type of Visa) recipients from buying shellfish or spending more than one-third of their benefits on foodstuffs such as non-white potatoes and ketchup. Who is going to make the decision of what should be "banned" and what should not?

Thanks Karen

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you for your comment and it may be true that the majority of Latinos (especially if undocumented) pay with cash and to answer your question as to how will you convenience them to change their happen habits to use a Visa card, well I'm not sure we can get them to use a Visa card. We need only look at the fact that we thought they all would sign up for drivers licenses if offered. I was just in an accident in CA with an undocumented worker, and he had no license... so getting our target population Latino's under the age of 30 to start using Visa cards, may not be understanding why they are afraid to "get documented". If they get documented, they fear they have to pay tax or fear deportation etc.

However the cash payers could be in the HPR system if they sign up for a rewards card at their retailers. i.e Safeway Rewards, which is now linked to HPR.

However eventually once bushiness's stop selling unhealthy foods, due to the surcharges and rewards start to change consumers habits, the cash payer group will basically join the group in that these unhealthy purchases will no longer be available due to the laws of supply and demand. Retailers will stop carrying items that dont sell, as a result, the cash payer will not be able to purchase them because businesses stopped supplying them.

Wow, thanks I didn't know there was legislation in the works in Wisconsin to limit purchases for SNAP card holders.

To answer your question as to "Who is going to make the decision of what should be "banned" and what should not?", under the HPR system, its based on what an individuals physician determines during their health examination. The health care provider sets up the profile and the system restricts, rewards and or surcharges based on a consumers subsequent purchases, and the physicians get rewarded for getting consumers to comply. Instead of them getting commissions for being drug pushers..... and being part of the problem.

Many physicians will tell you they feel like they are drug pushers today.... and need to do so to stay employed. The performance review is based on prescriptions written. So by surcharging the corporations that are drug pushing addictive unhealthy foods, we have the money to support a healthy model.

Photo of Ahmed Rub
Team

like the idea !!!
I wonder if I can block soda so that my card doesn't buy accept to buy any, I wonder if that can help me to reduce the amount of coca that I drink

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you. Yes we could add functionality that could block the soda. By working with your physician, the physician and you would come to an agreement as to what items you need to stop purchasing, and if you attempt to purchase them at the check out, the system will not allow the charges for the soda to go through and the cashier would take them away from you.

Photo of Ahmed Rub
Team

I think it would be cool if users can create a monthly plan with their nutrition and the application will make the card only accept to purchase items from the list !

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Team

Congratulations on making it to the Refinement Phase of the Healthy Lives Challenge Richard!
We really like how your idea will leverage the use of consumer data to help users make smarter and healthier purchasing decisions. The notion of incentivizing healthier consumer behavior with expert feedback and a rewards program is also very intriguing.

As you continue to develop this idea, it’d be great to consider how this idea can incentivize healthier behaviors with rewards instead of inhibiting consumers from purchasing certain items. How might Health Profile Reporting benefit the partnering businesses by promoting greater customer loyalty? It’d also be helpful to think about how this idea can be used on a voluntary basis by users versus scenarios where users might feel like “Big Brother” is monitoring their spending patterns. Perhaps the healthy profiles might be linked to a special rewards card instead of personal credit cards. In addition to consulting doctors, we think that it’ll be interesting to explore how this idea can provide users with recommendations in real time. For example, if a user frequented Dunkin Donuts every day for coffee, can the application propose a healthier alternative like green tea?

We also think your idea could work well in tandem with this idea: Personalized Healthy Shopping List - http://bit.ly/1D86Wla Given collaboration is the name of the game here at OpenIDEO, we hope you might reach out and collaborate to grow each other's concepts!

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Team

Thank you for your comments and suggestions. There can be discounts or coupons given to the consumer on their card based on healthy purchases or their ranking as compared to the general population. The healthier you eat, the more rewards or discounts.

However financial rewards are typically minimal due to the economic reality of capitalism. Why would a store not sell addictive foods, and support obesity because they sell more, despite them being unhealthy? Having VISA and the like control the surcharges, forces them into the healthy model. VISA will increase profits due to the fact that they receive a % of the surcharges for their IT fee and for managing the IT side with payment processing for health care.

Due to the the addictive nature of unhealthy foods, no amount of reward that can be offered realistically, can overpower a food addiction. Some experts say it is more powerful than cocaine. I feel that a voluntary system will be marginally successful at best, which is why the automatic surcharges to the consumer, retailer and supplier counteracts the addiction, and resulting health care crisis, and provides the needed additional funds to pay for the medical expenses. Insurance companies would be very loyal to this effort and discounts can be applied to the consumers and business's health insurance premiums based on their eating healthy foods.

There is no mandatory restrictions. A consumer can buy whatever they like, but both the businesses selling, and supplying the unhealthy foods as well as the consumer are surcharged to the Health Care Fund (Medicare/Medicaid for all) If people choose to eat healthy, they are not surcharged... so they have savings and incentives immediately. However if they are food addicted and cant overcome it voluntarily, they can ask their Dr. to set up the restrictions, or continue to be surcharged.

Health Profile Reporting will benefit the partnering businesses that benefit from a healthier population. Visa, Insurance Companies, Government, Farmers and every business that has to pay high premiums from the Health Care Crisis. If Safeway carries unhealthy foods, people go to Whole Foods.... so Safeway has to conform. Capitalism.

It will build consumer loyalty over time because it improved the lives of their customers, which in some cases, could be life saving. That in itself will build a very strong bond. SafeWay Supermarket... is the Safe Way.... it saved my life.... by not stocking unhealthy foods.

Consulting doctors and nutritionists would have set up the nutrition profile during the consultation and the consumer has the list of foods and a phone app that can create grocery lists based on recipes from all the current health certified cookbooks available real time.

Yes, if a user frequented Dunkin Donuts every day for coffee, and was addicted to donuts, as they make the unhealthy purchase, their profile can suggest in real time, and at their physical examination, what the alternative is, and they can start demanding green tea and organic whole grain donuts. Dunkin Donuts would eventually sell healthy foods because of the surcharges and competition that emerges.

Photo of Logan Powell
Team

Hi Richard and team!

Would you be willing to explore this idea if it was a grocery card instead?

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Team

Hi Logan and thank you for your question. Feel free to add some comments as to your idea for a grocery card and think of it as an additional card to a "VISA" or debit card, so as to be able to capture a consumers purchases outside the grocery store. (Fast food, McDonald's, Dunkin Donuts etc....)

Photo of Logan Powell
Team

I'm thinking that the grocery card could add the benefit of having data for individual purchases/items which could be used to create nutrition visualizations and identify correlations with weight loss data (in the El Loser Local idea, we're thinking of adding weight data into the formula) over a large enough sample... Another potential is not to have just one grocery card, but - rather, as you've suggested, an 'umbrella' card which could be made up of any company who wants to participate, i.e., share the individual item data of the customer's purchase :)

Thoughts?

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Team

Yes, the best card to use, would be the one people are currently using and that would be the debit/credit card. The idea of monitoring the weight via a scale located in the store and receiving coupons or some form of rewards at the store for reaching the goal, and receiving discounts or coupons that get emailed to the card/phone for immediate use at the store, sounds like a great collaboration on this effort.

Photo of Ayano Ota
Team

We had some brainstorming on this project and did an interview to one person based on the idea you invented. Here is some of our thoughts and suggestions we came up with.

First, we thought the project is really helpful for people who are working on changing their diet; for example, a person can give the information to his/her health counselor so that the counselor can give more precise advice based on the detailed information to the client. This can also shorten the actual meeting time between a client and a health counselor by providing information beforehand.
However, we were also concerned about the idea of restricting users’ purchases. For those who are serious about their health problem, they might consider the restriction relevant but for all the others who are not that in urgent of changing their eating habits, they wouldn’t feel that function so useful.

Hope this thoughts and suggestions can help you develop your ideas furthermore.

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Team

Thank you for your brainstorming comments! Very good points and with regard to your concerns about users who do not want any restrictions on purchases, that is entirely up to the user to default to no restrictions. However the business's and consumers that sell/purchase unhealthy items that a are still surcharged for contributing to the Health Care $ Crisis $ by selling unhealthy foods.

For instance, Coca Cola was using Cocaine in its soda, in addition to High Fructose Corn Syrup. If you do not want restrictions on this and want to purchase it, you may. However Coca Cola, and the like, will be surcharged based on a mathematical formula that represents the health care costs related to the current health issues within the population from drinking Coca Cola.

Due to the addictive nature of these ingredients, anyone who is addicted to them and continues to purchase them and later develops related health issues, would receive a Health Care Subsidy from the Medicaid/Medicare fund, which is basically funded by the business/consumers who sold/purchased these addictive and unhealthy items.

Photo of Chris Lee
Team

Great core idea: reflect a person's actions back to themselves so that they have some feedback on what they're doing.
Maybe a way to deal with the privacy aspect of it and to drive the behavior from a more intrinsic motivational position would be to do what my electric company started a while back: show me my usage as it compares to the average, the "most efficient" and "least efficient" households of the same general size in my area.
It feels great when I'm beating the "best." It feels bad when I start slipping. In all cases it helps to know how I'm really doing so that I can be honest with myself.

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Team

Excellent analogy with utility companies who are using similar motivational metrics.

Here is another company that would be a great partner. http://nanthealth.com/

Photo of Neel Rajani
Team

The power of the data you can collect from this is ridiculous. An easy way for the pilot programme was a simple dashboard which shows the most foods bought for example and gives one suggestion a month on what to cut out. Could be linked to other initiatives within this campaign about suggesting other similar foods!

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Team

Brilliant. Thank you for your input! Great ideas!

Photo of Robert Hieger
Team

A very practical and realizable idea, Richard!

In principle, your idea strikes at the heart of a rampant problem suffered by every socioeconomic group and culture across the United States, and indeed, increasingly, around the world.

Providing a monthly report to a consumer on their food purchasing habits can drive home to her what unhealthy purchases she has made and how she might improve her buying habits.

Tracking food purchases of consumers and making this information available to healthcare providers, on the one hand, might be a bit invasive; on the other, this data can counteract the tendency of a patient not to be 100% truthful with her primary care physician. Thus the benefits of allowing access to purchase data might very well outweigh its potential invasiveness. Furthermore, one might assume that such access to data would have as its prerequisite the emotional buy-in of the patient.

Another strong aspect to your idea is the fact that a negative reinforcement to food vendors selling unhealthy products is built in by VISA imposing a surcharge. Experience has shown that many unhealthy and harmful practices are carried out by businesses simply because they are profitable. In other words, business decisions are completely bereft of an ethical compass. Thus, striking at that profit might be the only motivator for a business to change its behavior.

Potential Area for Improvement:

As strong as your idea is, one area of concern is improving how your idea would address the needs of multiple socioeconomic strata, and likewise, the unique needs of different cultures across the country. Just as it is increasingly true that there are many people who do not even have access to a charge card or bank account, it is also true that there are discriminatory lending practices against certain ethnicities adding an additional dimension to the problems of using a credit card as a means of tracking purchases.

Nonetheless, I would not say that a credit card is still not possible. One idea that occurs to me is that perhaps such a charge card could be linked into SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance) food stamp benefits through the Department of Social Services (in New York, the Human Resources Administration). If this program issued VISA debit cards constrained to the purchase of food, this could still be administered by VISA, potentially. Perhaps this governmental partnership could greatly expand the reach of the program you propose.

Photo of Richard
Team

Thank you Robert! I appreciate the comments.

In response to your suggestions and areas for improvement, one way to solve the problem regarding people who do not have access to a Visa Card, or the like, or who are on welfare or public assistance would be a control.

More and more states are using debit cards (SNAP) for welfare, disability, unemployment etc... Any type of transaction card or data entry at the point of sale could be interfaced into the HPR system.
For those who have neither and pay cash, they would be required to register and receive a card, or a PIN number in order to check out and make their purchase.

For those who avoid all such establishments and pay cash, once 90% of the country is on this system, the culture will automatically care for this segment by the fact that these unhealthy foods will be eliminated due to the surcharges, public awareness and changes in peoples buying habits.

Companies will no longer produce them because no one is buying them. McDonald's, will sell organic Non GMO bacon and eggs and hamburgers, but eliminate the unhealthy foods like soda, processed foods with saturated fats etc.

You totally grasped the root cause of the problem. Large corporations design food, via addictive properties, to achieve what Warren Buffet refers to as a sustainable business model "repeat customers". Trying to change peoples habits with education, as we have seen, has little effect when dealing with dopamine addictions as strong as cocaine.

Photo of Robert Hieger
Team

You're more than welcome. I think you have a very worthy and plausible idea here.

In New York where I live, the means of SNAP benefits distribution is through an electronic benefits card that is swiped just like a VISA card, but it does not bear the VISA logo. But if other states are going the route of issuing VISA debit cards, perhaps New York will jump on the bandwagon. This could only help your idea.

Pardon my ignorance, but I am not aware of what an HPR system is, but from your description, if I understand it correctly, the sales data would be shared with a primary care physician's office.

Your point about companies falling into line with regard to food production is well taken. Nothing influences a company's behavior more than challenges to its bottom line.

I wish you all the best in your efforts for your idea.

Thanks for your response,

Robert Hieger

Photo of Shane Zhao
Team

Great idea post Richard! We'd love it if you might describe this idea more by filling in more content to the Full Description section of you idea post. Perhaps you might consider helping people better grasp how this idea could play out by describing some of the proposed activities you've outlined. Check this example: http://www.openideo.com/open/e-waste/concepting/neighbourhood-e-waste-champion/ where a few simple scenarios were created to explain the goodness on the idea in a human-centered way.

Also, you might like to check out and build on this post on healthy report cards from the Research Phase: https://openideo.com/challenge/healthy-lives/research/school-cafeterias-use-technology-to-create-healthy-eating-report-card

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Team

Thank you Shane, I appreciate the feedback and suggestions and will add those refinements to the idea. I like the Healthy Schools SMART program. HPR is essentially the same concept , but on a broader scale.

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Team

Thank you!

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Team

Congrats on this being today's Featured Contribution!