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Following in the Footsteps of Startup Culture

Startups depend upon strong team dynamics and consistent expressions of gratitude; we should look towards them for inspiration.

Photo of Daniel Wexler
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The startup realm is characterized by big ideas and ambition. However, it is also an area associated with uncertainty and limited resources. With these stressors in mind, it is abundantly clear why a positive, optimistic workplace culture is essential. In the past, successful entrepreneurs were defined by the ingenuity of their idea. However, this philosophy has changed in recent times. Over the past two years, I have heard several people speak about the process of developing a startup and one thing that remained consistent between the presentations was the emphasis on the individuals driving a project forward, rather than ingenuity of the idea itself. Startups rely on strong team morale and persistent motivation, because an early-stage company will not survive without these two qualities. Thus, looking at successful startups as innovators in gratitude expression is a great path towards developing a method of improving gratitude in all workspaces.

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I am a senior at the University of Michigan studying Biopsychology, Cognition and Neuroscience.

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Photo of Ella Scott

I regularly visit your site and find a lot of interesting information. Not only good posts but also great comments. Thank you and look forward to your page growing stronger https://www.hotmailissue.com

Photo of Laura Dzhilavian

Totally agree, without the teamwork and peer support many start-ups would not be able to achieve success! This spirit is essential for any company development.

Photo of OpenIDEO

Hi Daniel Wexler ,

Great to see you sharing your provocations around this topic and bringing your voice to the Gratitude Challenge Community!

From the insights shared in your post, we think it may be particularly interesting to for you to attend our Gratitude in the Workplace Webinar with University of Washington positive organizational leadership expert, Ryan Fehr tomorrow, Oct 13 @ 9:00 a.m. Pacific Time. He’ll be discussing recommendations for designing Ideas for this topic.

You can register for the webinar here https://goo.gl/forms/owhdGkljXkvmW7mi2

We hope to see you there!

Photo of Abir Chowdhury

I never really thought of this perspective, but now that you brought it up it makes a lot of sense to me. Like you said, startups don't survive without team morale and gratitude. I think even the largest of workplaces could benefit from adopting this aspect of startup culture.

Photo of Tannia Rodriguez

Great contribution! My own experience with working at a startup has demonstrated that the relationship between employees is crucial to the success of the company. In some ways it's easier to express gratitude with a smaller team because everyone is invested into the success of the same idea which builds loyalty between employees. It's easier to identify people's contributions to projects which makes it normal to express gratitude those individuals.

Photo of Andy Shaw

Yes! This is very true. Not all startups will have strong team dynamics, but many will. It's important that each person carries multiple functions, and sometimes these functions will overlap. Each member will often work with another on the same task, so they need to have a strong sense of teamwork and be able to express gratitude and feelings to each other.