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The Cookbook

A cookbook of teaching recipes by leading practitioners and educators to introduce design-doing into your classrooms. Tried, tested, true.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
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Context: 

Our goal is to introduce the design-doing mindset into the higher education experience in the United States. As as part of our research we discovered that design-thinking is now well known by educators. Teaching it, however, is another matter.

Problem Space :

Part of the challenge stems from difficulty in teaching project based classes, which is the pre-requisite for teaching design-doing in classes. Educators used to lecturing have to spend almost 3x the effort of as lecture-based class, upfront - even though the average effort is about the same.  The other difficulty is that  most of the teaching assets are made by designers for designers. Educators are still, for the most part,  putting together their own design-doing teaching plans from scratch because the assets available online simply do not respect how explicit and timed things need to be for teaching.

Solution Space: 

Our bet is that IF we can make it easier to Educators to teach the design process, THEN they will in fact be willing to introduce design-doing into the classrooms RESULTING IN students learning critical skills relevant for their transition to Industry.  

The embodiment of this hypothesis is the Cookbook : a collection of teaching "recipes" to teach design-doing in your classroom. We surface recipes from expert practitioners in industry and academia ensuring that the skills being taught in the classroom are relevant to industry.  With a focus on developing the design-doing mindset and skillset, the cookbook refocuses the educator on facilitation rather than curating materials.

See the click-through storyboard : here

The cookbook approaches a design-doing classroom like a three tiered cake :

Image title

The bottom tier is classroom management - this includes forming, guiding and evaluating group performance. These are essential for smooth functioning of a class

The middle tier is design-led instruction. The educators chooses which design-doing mindset and skillset s.he wishes to introduce  e.g. the mindset of empathy and the skillset of design research. This is inserted into a regular project-based class. 

The top tier is real-world experiences  which are overlaid on the design-doing experience. We know that design-doing is best learnt through solving real-world problems.

The cookbook provides teachable recipes for each tier including sample courses where the recipes have been integrated into full quarter/semester courses by different educators.

The highlight of the solution are :

  1. Teachable recipes, created by expert industry practitioners and educators : tried, tested, true
  2.  Search for specific recipes or courses integrating recipes
  3. Modular recipes so you can start anywhere and be assured of finding all necessary assets to get going. e.g. Brainstorming may need a sample Point of View, which is provided as an ingredient.
  4. Sample courses  which you can use to get off to a running start in your discipline and modify to your needs
  5. Community curated teaching resources - presentations, videos, white papers etc
  6. Creative commons with transparent attribution - if you create a recipe you become the author. If you copy and change someone else's recipe, you become the editor
  7. Discussion per recipe - so educators can share their experience of using a recipe


We know simply putting together an online resource does not a good teaching experience make. Therefore we pair the Cookbook with a ClassLab (see attachment) where we teach educators how to re-design their course to be design-led and include the Cookbook in that process. 


RESEARCH 

The cookbook is a part of a larger set of interventions into the higher education system. This comes out of our primary research into the higher education system in the United States. We call this Project Moonshine :) See more here

Finally, everything you see has been validated by educators. We ran a workshop for 20 professors late last year where we handed them the materials in the cookbook without any explanation. The educators took it back, read them all and came back asking for more. We got feedback that the recipes are well made and desired. We also asked if we should stop or continue. Unanimously : continue. 


Who is your idea designed for and how does it reimagine higher education to support the needs of tomorrow?

For the educator interested in bringing design-doing into her classroom in college or high school. The cookbook makes it easier to run a design-doing classroom by making high quality teachable design assets available to educators. We expect, because of this many more educators will be encouraged to introduce design-doing into their classroom, benefitting students by equipping them with skills valued by industry.

This idea emerged from:

  • A group brainstorm

What skills, input or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

Help us bring the cookbook to more colleges and schools around the United States. If you are a school or college is interested in piloting this, please let us know.

What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

We've run a ClassLab workshop, where we asked 20 professors from 6-7 colleges to come in with the intention of re-designing their courses to be design-led. (see attachment). We used the cookbook paper recipes in the workshop, simply leaving them on their tables to see if they would respond. Nearly all of them took the recipes back, read them and came back asking for more. We would like to run more of the ClassLab workshops across the country.

Tell us about your work experience:

I am a self-taught engineer-turned-designer since 2007. I work as an experience designer, design facilitator and mentor for startups. I follow a design process I call Startup by Design and love designing interventions for Big Systems. I've worked in spaces of enterprise, entrepreneurship, non-profits, healthcare, education, manufacturing and a few other sectors. Since late 2015 we at SAP have been on the journey to introduce design-doing into the higher education system in the United States.

How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone? 2-3 sentences.

The materials available today to teach design-doing are not designed for teaching. They're not scaffolded enough and don't consider teaching needs. We have teaching recipes created for educators. We show you how to use it, give example courses that have used it and help your redesign your course around it. You can pick recipes on design "jobs", classroom management, stokes and even full courses with design-doing embedded. And its all Creative Commons. Can we help you get started ?

What is the specific problem your idea is trying to solve? 1 sentence.

Making it easy for educators looking to introduce design-doing into the classroom, to find what they need to get started, get teaching and get better at it.

How is your idea different or unique from what is currently on the market?

In three ways :

1. We approach teaching design as a series of design "jobs" : You pick the jobs you think are relevant and the depth you think your student should aim for, not the whole process. We have seen educators respond to this

2. We create recipes that consider the needs of an educator : strongly prescriptive, teaching assets, link lists, maturity levels, authorship. This helps them get started.

3. We help educators use and insert the recipes into class: our course design process

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

By the level of adoption we see. For this year, the goal is to scale this to 10 universities / school with 10 educators in each.

How might your idea be transferable to a large number of people?

The cookbook is essentially a platform. Once we see momentum within our initial cohort we hope to make it available for educators at large, paired with an online course design process.

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

We are in the midst of market development on both sides : practitioners and educators.

Internally we are committed to building the prototype into a product.

Meanwhile, we are testing approaches to get practitioners in the Bay Area to contribute recipes, and concierging with 3 educators to know what it take to get it into the classrooms. This will continue after the challenge.

We hope the visbility on OpenIDEO will help us reach and scale to both communities, faster
View more

Attachments (2)

TTT_Collage.jpg

The Class Lab we ran for around 20 educators in UC San Diego last year. Our bet that there is a need for a cookbook, was validated here.

cookbook_home.png

Homepage of the prototype cookbook

51 comments

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Photo of Ashley Sun
Team

Hi Rana,

This is such an interesting project idea that I think could really shake up the education system. The Cookbook seems like a very integrated way to allow educators to really curate their programs to the needs of their students. I know that you have received unanimous approval from educators who have tested the Cookbook, but have you received any feedback from students who have been taught using a Cookbook teaching recipe? I think looking at feedback from both educators and students is very important in this case, as the Cookbook should not only make it teaching easier for educators, but also ease the learning process for students.

Best of luck!

Ashley

Photo of Kaiying Chen
Team

Hi Rana,

This is a fantastic project that you are pursuing and I think it can make a real impact on the prototypical education system in the United States. Too much of what teachers teach to students nowadays is taken straight from the textbook, and I think the Cookbook can make a serious impact in helping teachers stay up to date with the best material to give to their students. Collaboration is the key to forming the best ideas, and I think you have an executable strategy to promote collaboration.
I think that your concept would work best in a real-world classroom, but it would be interesting to see how you would pursue development of The Cookbook in a digital space as well.

Photo of Teo John
Team

Hi Rana,

You are doing incredible project to educate people on design doing and helping them to become design thinking chef with proven recipes.
 (1)What is the user journey map of a facilitator or student using your design doing recipe?
 (2)Do you have any assessment methodology whether your design doing project is achieving the desired outcomes?

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Teo John !

On Journeys :
There are several journey maps. From the research perspective we know the journey of the student. See it here : https://twitter.com/AlinaRadinsky/status/832661794854350849

From the interaction design perspective, there are three pathways : Consume, Contribute and Create. We have the beats ( human -computer interactions ) for each, although its an internal design document for now.

Happy to show it via skype / hangout if it interests you.

On Methodology : For now, just a goal for scaling. Happy to hear thought on this ? I haven't done any thinking on this, so far, so grateful for any nudges i this direction.

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and team,

There is just a week left of refinement. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

So sorry I got to this today @Kate Rushton. Done.

Photo of Akshat
Team

This is amazing! I think in our initial years of schooling, teachers understand us and they make us learn with many of the design principles/tools(pictures, drawings, art/crafts etc.) applicable to us at that age. But as we grow, this technique looses focus. If we can create a readily available catalog of design principles applicable to respective field of study, it will benefit the whole community as such.
I am based out of India, let me know if I can contribute towards this project.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Akshat - added you to the team, so you receive updates.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and team,

There are a few hours left in the refinement phase if you have any questions feel free to reach out to me.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Hi Kate Rushton : thanks for checking in.
None at this point.
Updated.
Do take a look ?
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Dominique Nguyen
Team

Hi Rana and team,

I just went through your storyboard, which was very well-designed and thorough. This idea seems great for a collaborative kind of learning, in which the work of a team may yield better quality than the work of an individual. Because the cookbook itself is very detailed in its methodology, I think you should market this product to new teachers/professionals who may not have the experience of executing group projects in a classroom setting. In many ways, I think seasoned professors may tend to stick to their ways since they may deem it as "tried and true," given their success with it in the past. For these more experienced educators, the marketing needs to be geared in a way that the teaching methods in a classroom would fare well from some innovation, and that real value can be derived from different methodology methods in design-doing. Lastly, I would say ClassLab is going to be a real asset to this idea. It would give educators a much more interactive and tangible way to observe the methodologies and apply it to their own contexts.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Dominique Nguyen !

I resonate with your advice.

Younger educators, we have noticed have a higher risk appetite.
More experienced educators need to know that something works, before they commit.

Our hope is, as we create small cohorts in each university, the younger educators will help convince the more experienced ones. While there will always be a section that does not want to change teaching styles - and there is a place for that as well : a good lecture is a work of art just like a well facilitated class is - we feel the support of the tenured, experienced educators is essential for the growth of this style of education within one university.

On the ClassLab : yes, we believe so as well. It was was one of our bets that educators need a safe space to try out a new approach. The ClassLab is intended to be that space.

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Sophia null
Team

Hi Rana Chakrabarti and Team!

Congratulations on being selected for the Refinement Phase. Please let me know if I can help contribute in anyway!

Sophia

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Sophia !I've added you to the team.
Lets find some way to work together.
I'm based out of Mountain View.
Happy to get a coffee.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Sophia null
Team

Hi Rana,

Thank you! I would love to grab a coffee to discuss a way to work together. What's your email address? Let's try to schedule fo next week.

Warm regards,
Sophia

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Great to see all the collaboration that is going on and I can't wait to see how The Cookbook develops.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Kate :)
Been swamped, but will spend more time on refinement early next week.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Great !
Mail me on : rana.chakrabarti@sap.com, Sophia.
The coming week is best.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Welcome to the Refinement phase Rana! We've added new Refinement questions to your original submission that we'd love for you to answer. Please check out the Refinement Phase Toolkit for instructions on how to answer the new questions and other recommendations we encourage all idea teams to consider in the upcoming weeks.

Refinement Phase Toolkit: http://ideo.pn/2du9sf7

Lastly, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 02/01" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks OpenIDEO !

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and Lucy,

You might want to check out Cobuy in our food waste challenge - https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/top-ideas/cobuy-group-buying-software-that-helps-people-buy-good-food-at-good-prices-together - it has a great example of prototyping using an online form to gather feedback.

Photo of Teo John
Team

Hi Rana,

Is your teaching Cookbook modelled on the following cookbook recipe?
http://archive.ecml.at/mtp2/chagal_setup/results/en/cookbook/menu.htm

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Hi Teo,
How interesting !
Thanks for looking that up.
The metaphor came from our own insights during an intense brainstorm.
We were looking for a way to explain what design is like.
Organic, messy, gets better with practice, a doing sport.
At one point cooking become the central metaphor.
From there recipes became the natural organizing metaphor for this project.
We are fussy about the metaphor : we need the recipes to be true to the idea.
So we ask for and accept only recipes that work and have been in use by the author,
not ones that *might* work.
Like grandma's recipes : tried, tested and true.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and team,

I can see a lot of academics new to design thinking using The Cookbook. Do you think there would be a need for Cookbooks for different disciplines to cater for them? Could there be a recipe and a context button for them e.g. a button for 'engineering' for the engineers to quickly pull up information on how the recipe applies to engineering?

To give the idea credibility to some people who maybe more reluctant to try The Cookbook, could you include inks to the research ‘The Cookbook’ is grounded in? Would they be able to see reviews of the recipes? How would the recipes be arranged? Could you use tags to categorize the recipes? (sorry lots of questions)

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Hi Kate,
On catering to disciplines:
Yes there is. We know educators are discipline specific. We believe the basic unit of consumption for an educator is the course. Within a course say Computer Science, educators freely share curriculum's today. We want to build on this behavior. The courses section is where we will put up sample courses where educators have inserted design into their curriculum. This can be searched and found by college, educator or discipline. Naturally you can copy it, add it to your collection and remix it as well.

on research : This comes out out of our own primary research of over 25-30 educators and as many students over last year. I did this research and synthesis myself. Will post a link to Project Moonshine where we keep the material.

On Reviews : yes. We imagine recipes being commented on by other educators who use it. You can see that. You also see whether the recipes was recommended ( basically liked) by other educators. In the more advanced version we imagine recipes endorsed by well known practitioners and educators.

On arrangement: Along the 3 layers of the cake : Classroom Management, Creative Mindsets ( stokes) and Design Doing Lessons. All three are integrated into Courses.

On tags: yep. Thats how we will pull all of them together. The tags represent the learning goal - the kind of mindset the educator wants to create.

On questions: not at all ! thank you.

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana,

It is great that The Cookbook is focusing on design thinking. In the future, could you expand to product and project management recipes? e.g. https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/future-of-highered/ideas/new-school-approach-to-blended-higher-education-especially-for-project-management-courses/

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and team,

Welcome to the refinement phase, if you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me by using @ and typing my name.

Take care,

Kate

Photo of Rahul Ramath
Team

Hi Rana Chakrabarti 

Definitely loving the approach we are going for this. I also feel that to start off atleast, the Classlab workshop approach with cookbook is definitely the key to help educators get into this ecosystem in the first place. Though I would love if we can structure cookbook.edu in a way that it can self sustain itself and spread design thinking approach just as an online resource too.

But completely agree with having many more workshops in future like the one at UCSD during summer. (maybe the scale can get bigger with each workshop)

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rana and Lucy,

Great idea!

I am going to copy in a few people who might be able to provide feedback on the implementation of the design thinking recipe cards into higher education below. What would you need for piloting this project?

Eduardo Testart Mukund Dan Ryan Leah Edwards Gregory Wilson Isaac Jumba 

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

There are a few posts in the research phase that may support your idea or give you potential sources for feedback. I wonder if the institutions these people are associated with would be interested in conducting a pilot of the cookbook: Are our best teachers rewarded? and Caleb Wilson posts - especially @An Instructor Prepares: Welcome to Higher Ed
Torie | Wichita State IDT
 

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Kate - grateful !

What we need :

1. The educator has a baseline knowledge of the design process, since we will not be teaching the process, but how to introduce it into the teaching process

2. The educator be running or interested in running project-based classes, since the design process builds on this.

3. The educator be interested in introducing this into his/ her classroom.

4. The educator be willing to spend 2-3 days at a ClassLab where we introduce them to the course design process and cookbook and help them test-teach a part it to build their confidence. If we get about 20 educators in one location, we can run a ClassLab at that location.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Kate Rushton : thank you !
I've left invitations to connect on Michael and Caleb's pages.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Leah Edwards
Team

I love the Cookbook. Because I have been hearing about this project from a member of the team for the past year, I know some things you didn't emphasize in your description here but that I am impressed by. My understanding is that you are open to many people/organizations contributing recipes, which could be seen as being generous and/or a practical tactic to ensure success.

It will be extremely valuable to have curriculum units, which are based on real-world challenges and experience, available to instructors. I completely agree that most do not have time to update a significant amount of course content every quarter or semester. And making the content available in small units lets the instructor select whatever is appropriate while retaining control over the course curriculum.

My question is how to make the Cookbook sustainable. Even though I feel that companies and skilled designers SHOULD want to contribute to educating future workers (or citizens, broadly), the reality is that priorities change and people get busy with other projects. What is the incentive for people to contribute recipes after the initial excitement?

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks Leah !

Correct - this is only valuable if we have expert professionals and educators, wherever they may be contributing and interested educators consuming. In a fast evolving discipline any other approach would simply make the material obsolete as it written.

On sustainability - we see two pieces of "business machinery" needed for sustainability.

The first is the desire to contribute.

We've been reaching out to experts within the company and our insight is that expert *want* to contribute, for no other reason other than to pass their knowledge along. We know this as practitioners ourselves, but its gratifying to see this out in the wolrd. If it wasn't there, there's not much we could do. We need experts since we want recipes that work, not one which *might* work.

The second is a process to make it easy for expert practitioners and educators to contribute recipes.

We have one member of our team, Austin Meyer  doing this. Given the desire to contribute, this is a question of getting the logistics and scheduling right.

If we can get to the experts in-person, we think we can make it easy for them to contribute. We've also testing this in a group setting internally with success. Based on that we're considering running meetups in the Bay Area where experts could drop in for an hour.

If you know of expert industry practitioners and educators in the Bay Area, please let or Austin Meyer know ? We expect each of these engagements is a one-time thing lasting 1-2 hours with minor effort for reviewing edits afterwards. Once we know the process works well for the Bay Area, we will consider reaching out further, or remotely.

But, what does the expert get out of it, self-interest wise, for his effort ?

We feel reciprocity is important. Even if some experts will do it for the greater good, there needs to be something received in return for the effort. We're considering have the expert do a 2 minute video introduction to her recipe, which we shoot and edit. This accompanies the recipe.While making it easier to the educator to present the material, but also benefits the expert in a few ways :

1. He can create recipes for skills he wishes students came with from college.

2. The video and the quality of the recipe creates visibility for the expert with educators, opening the door for future opportunities. The university system can be a blackbox.

3. Finally - passing your knowledge on to the next generation, is one way of becoming immortal :)

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Andrea
Team

Hi Leah - good point - any suggestions?
Andrea

Photo of Leah Edwards
Team

I agree that many people (like all of us in this challenge) enjoy contributing to educational programs and learning materials. The issue is just how to keep everyone focused on the Cookbook versus posting their curriculum content elsewhere.

One of the functions I oversaw at Stanford was case writing for entrepreneurship and innovation cases. We distributed Stanford business school cases through the Harvard case distribution system. Faculty around the world know to go that source for content (written by many schools/professors), and schools around the world know to go there and expect to pay per-case-per-student for use of the cases. While I was at Stanford we discussed, but didn't decide, how we were going to distibute curriculum modules that didn't follow a case format but included experiential learning exercises, video, etc.

So, while I feel you are smart to focus first on what the students, instructors and contributors need and want in terms of the recipes, you will need to eventually focus on becoming a known and trusted source of curriulum and will need to provide incentives for everyone to go to, and then stick with, the Cookbook. The "business model" will have to be prototyped and tested too.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks for the thoughtful post Leah !
We haven't arrived at this point yet, but I see the value of having this conversation early.
Your observation on the Harvard case distribution system is insightful. Assuming success, we should see cloning happening fairly quickly. Especially since this is space of interest for startups, generally speaking.
If we assume a problem of plenty, what then is the incentive for an educators to stick with this platform vs any other ?

I see a few possibilities to creating a barrier to exit.

1. The quality of the recipe and the discovery and editorial process we employ.

This remains in-house and not easy to replicate. We focus on making recipes teachable and granular and can do so because we teach ourselves. This is not copied easily and is uniquely valuable for the educator.

2. Creating cross-linkages or "armatures" between recipes.

We intend to provide tags which allow an educator to put in a the mindset she wants to created - say critical thinking - and get back all recipes across classroom management, creative mindsets and design-doing and courses which match. We will seed the initial linkages. This is not easy to replicate since it requires deep understanding of the process and relevant mindsets. Educators will be able to enrich this with their own tags, making it more valuable. These linkages can likely be imitated somewhat, but once they're rich enough, you wouldn't want to start over in a new space since you simply get better results here.

3. Providing digital object identification
We have done this yet, but one suggestion is to have digital object identification which allows an educator to see where and how her recipes have been used. Essentially a link back. I understand this can be referenced in papers. This of course is easily replicate and incentivizes creating more recipes, not so much creating a barrier of exit.

4. Disallowing export or querying of recipes via API unless charged for.
This is common in many community content databases, for example Yelp. You cannot export out. Accessing the data via API's requires paying. Downloading via pdf of course makes sense. Essentially making it hard for any other platform to plug in.

My current view is : if we can a system with high flow-through of quality recipes, easy search and find capabilities along with incentives connected to writing papers, while disincentivizing export of the recipes via APIs we have a first approach to making the Cookbook the go-to place for educators.

What do you think ?

I'm already thinking of you as a part of my personal board of advisors on this. :) If you consent, I'd love to understand more about the harvard case distribution system. Would you be open to having a longer conversation on that ? I'd be happy to make time.

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Leah Edwards
Team

All of these technical abilities could be a great help to maintaining value for the contributors. It's a particularly interesting idea to count "link-backs"-- like references in publlications. I'll be curious (and hopeful) to see if curriculum "popularity" can be valued as much as research references.

And, I would love to help--
Leah

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Love the question, Leah -

 Could we make curriculum popularity a unit of success for the educators ? I would love to. It would make teaching and the teaching experience the unit of comparison between educators and provide a counter-balance to the research focus we see often. And might it start up a virtuous cycle of educators remixing popular curriculum's to create "best of" curriculums ?

My hypothesis is yes - educators freely borrow from each other informally. Making it easy to do so, and make the popularity transparent might be very attractive for a new educator looking to try out "something new".

Will keep the "most popular courses" in the feature list for the courses page.

Thank you for offering to help, Leah. I'm adding you to the team on OpenIdeo, but also messaging you on LinkedIn. Let's find the time and space to talk about the Harvard case distribution system ?

Warmly,

Rana

Photo of Gregory Wilson
Team

Like this idea. Visually it could look similar to this: http://design-kit.herokuapp.com/methods

Photo of Tori
Team

Definitely excited to see how this will also enhance students' design learning experience in project courses!

Photo of An Old Friend
Team

Hi Rana, this is a very cool concept!

As a graduate from Parsons, I can tell you that they are fairly open to ideas like this and it could be worth contacting someone there to see if there is any interest. Perhaps you could assemble some sort of workshop or info gathering session. I'll keep an eye on this!

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

@Michael Matthews : thanks !
I'd love to reach out and check if there is any interest.
If you know of someone I might reach out to, I'd be grateful for an introduction.
Even directing them to this page to start a conversation might be a good start.
Warmly,
Rana

Photo of Rachel Chen
Team

Loving how we're trying to bridge the gap between industry-relevant skills vs. exam-based classroom experiences. Excited to see how it turns out -- I'm definitely interested in seeing more "example courses" that embody & encourage design thinking.

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks @Rachel Chen. Couldn't have done it without you, Tori and Rahul. Have them join in !

On example courses - agree. At the moment I'm concierging with one educators teaching decision sciences to understand how we can make the course design process simple. Then I'll do it with a few more educators. These courses will be the first example courses to go online.

If you know of educators who might be interested, let me know !

Warmly,
Rana

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congrats on this being today's Featured Contribution!

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Thanks IDEO !

Photo of Teo John
Team

Hi Rana,

Sounds great ! Could you provide a real example on how the cookbook is used in ClassLab ?

Photo of Rana Chakrabarti
Team

Hi Teo,

I'll speak about how it has been and how it will be used i the future since we're still prototyping the process.

In the first version of the classlab, we emphasised the test-teaches, where educators were given case studies and worked in teams to teach of one aspect of the design process to the audience. We also had a course re-design section where the educator could come in with a course she was teaching and redesign it to include design-doing.

The next iteration will flip these sections. We want to focus on the course design first and then the test teach, so that educators can take back something tangible they are working on.

The course design process is designed around the three tiers I've mentioned here. I work on a life-sized chart where we first establish the course material the educator intends to teach, timing, milestones etc and then weave in the recipes for group dynamics, design-doing, stokes ( creative mindsets) and an exciting real-world project that would bring the material alive.

I'm concierging with an educator at the moment to refine this approach an help him introduce it into his class. Happy to share results once I have them reliably. Mail me on rana.chakrabart@sap.com if you're interested.

Warmly,
Rana

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Lucy Chen  : hey Lucy - do review ? thanks !

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Hi Rana and team,

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