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Love the Food but Hate the Waste and Dream about Zero Hunger

Food loss campaign aimed at reducing the wastage footprint

Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

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Introduction : The Global population is forecasted  to grow from the current 7 billion to 9 billion by 2050 .  Creating the need for demand , we need to increase our food production . Food is one of the most important drivers of environment pressure , particularly in terms of water , Land and resource use , green house gas emission (CHGs) , pollution and subsequent climate and habitat change . In terms of economic  impacts , food waste represents  high waste  management cost and money wasted . In India 40 % of the food production is wasted . This is as much food waste as the whole the United Kingdom Consumes .

Methodology : I am very passionate about thinking and working to “ Love Food , Hate Waste and Dream Zero Hunger” .  I feel happy  in seeing hungry people with smiles on their faces . I used to spend a lot of time with the people in the Community Market ( Sabji Mandi ) . Everyday there was a common picture , I saw many of them dumping vegetable and food waste into dustbins . I got really worried to see the state of the dustbins . It always upset me when people waste food .  We have thousand s of people in India who go hungry everyday .

I started  for “ Love Food , Hate Waste and Dream Zero Hunger” research work in following steps .

Reduce

  • My organization started to awareness campaigns to prevent food wastage among the consumers of the community market ( Sabji Mandi ).  In the awareness program  the consumer was advised to plan out their meal and make their shopping list to determine  actually need for the week . About 20% of what we buy in urban India ends up being thrown  away . You could in the week after cut down on the surplus and soon in two or three weeks you will have a precise list of your family’s weekly consumption. You have no idea how amazed you will be at how much you buy and what you actually consume. Needless to say that the difference is but naturally wasted.
  • Buy in quantities you can realistically use. Avoid impulse buys. It will more or less find the bin.
  • If you cook at home, make sure you cook keeping in mind there is no excess. You can always complete your meals with a few fruits rather than keep some extra food in the refrigerator. It’s a lot better and a healthier practice too.
  • Select according to their shelf life. Use the green vegetables first.
  • Reuse the refrigerated left- over’s  (if any) for the very next meal.
  • If you work in an office that has a canteen, check with them on how they manage excess food.
  • If you host a family get together either at home, a marriage hall or throw a party at a hotel, make sure you plan for the food to be transported to a place like an orphanage or an old age shelter.
  • Make finishing your plate a habit. Try to inculcate it further to as many possible.

Reuse

Reuse is our recovery program . We started a Bio – gas plant in community market  area (  Sabji Mandi ).It works as follows .

This plant works on similar principles of traditional bio- gas plants with the exception of type of feed with the above modifications.

The waste generated in community market  area (  Sabji Mandi)  in the form of vegetable refuge, stale cooked and uncooked food, extracted tea powder, waste milk and milk products can all be processed in this plant. Based on the understanding of thermophilic microorganisms in particular and microbial processes in general, there are two important modifications made in the conventional design of the biogas plant .

The gas generated in this plant is used for gas lights fitted around the plant. The potential use of this gas would be for market area’s  Tea Stall and Restaurant . The residual of the bio- gas plant the manure generated is high quality and it will  be used in garden and agriculture  fields.

Success of this biogas plant depends a great deal on proper segregation of the market  waste. The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

Thus the efficient disposal of market waste can be eco friendly as well as cost effective. While calculating the cost effectiveness of such waste disposal one has to consider more than monitory aspects. The dumping of waste vegetable  in unmanned area may not be very civilized. It can also lead to population growth of nuisance animals. It is undoubtedly unhygienic and can pose threat to the habitat. These factors will add to the value of such plants. Using the natural friends in the form of thermophiles, methanogenic micro-organisms and their consortiums we can certainly handle the market waste and may be other biodegradable waste like paper.

Recycle / Compost

In the community market If the vegetable are not suitable for sales or not suitable for human consumption it will  sent to the bio – gas plant and the residual was generated  manure . The generated manure is high quality . By recycling ,we ensures that the bio – waste does not go to landfill sites thus  preventing environmental damage and improving  agricultural output by improving soil . It is ensured that the pre – consumer waste are fully recycled .

The Process

The operational function of the “Love Food , Hate Waste and Dream Zero Hunger”  research work  are as per Process Flow Diagram

Conclusion

Rising food prices or the prevalent food inflation in India can be effectively evaded by good food waste management practices. If consumers have a fair idea and keep a track of what percentage of food purchased gets discarded as pre-consumer waste, costs can be saved on various fronts like labour, disposal and goods purchased. By increasing individual savings, food waste prevention contributes towards better community. If the resulting bio-waste is not thrown away into landfills but is rather reused and recycled, green house gases like methane which is more harmful than CO2, can be debarred from deteriorating the environment. Also waste reduction would imply using less of fuels for refrigeration, transportation purposes thus preserving the environment. In the process of reducing waste, the society awakens about the sensitive and unrealized issue of food wastage and contributes thus making a positive move towards Food Security .

What is a provocation or insight that might inspire others during this challenge?

India is often called the land of festivals. Just imagine how much food is wasted in functions, restaurants and other places! It is impossible for anyone to taste this wide array of dishes. It is a social crime as millions in the country are malnourished and go to bed hungry. We are trying an effective solution that anyone can do in any city to reroute the excess food to the needy.

Tell us about your work experience:

We are already in process with a proper design with a view to make a fit of entrepreneurship program in several small pockets for the youth who are achieve the Love Food mission

This post emerged from:

  • A group brainstorm

229 comments

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Your plan to reduce, reuse, recycle and compost is how to achieve this goal and by educating. Great plan.

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Preventing food waste saves money and resources. Resources used to produce uneaten food include: 30 percent of fertilizer, 31 percent of cropland, 25 percent of total fresh water consumption and 2 percent of total energy consumption.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
29. Stop Snacking:
If you are snacking all of the time you are going to eat less when lunch or dinner is serving. Stop snacking and enjoy more of those goods for you foods.
30. Visit the Store Less Often:
If you are shopping frequently you are more likely to purchase foods that you don’t really need. Schedule a once per week shopping day and avoid going any more frequently.
31. Eat Before you Shop:
Food shopping on an empty stomach leads to impulse purchases that will likely go to waste.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
28. Freeze Meals:
You can cook portions of food to freeze to eat at a later time. Foods that are really good for this include spaghetti and lasagna, but there are many others as well. As a bonus, you gain a night of no cooking required!

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
26. Use Old Fruits & Veggies:
Rather than toss fruits and veggies that are soon to spoil, use them to create fruit salads, smoothies, and more.
27. Repackage Foods:
If you buy in bulk or larger quantities, separate the meats and store individual portions inside of freezer bags. His is a step that will greatly reduce waste.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
25. Inspect Your Food:
Before any food is purchased, ensure that it is propelled inspected. Look for signs of produce that is going bad, meat that may have been on the shelf too long or for other signs of food that is about to spoil.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
24. Buy Funny Looking Products:
There are many fruits and vegetables that are thrown away simple because their color, size and other characteristics does not match with the rest of the items. These food items are perfect to eat and buying these items from the supermarket or local grocery store can help reduce waste that would otherwise end up in landfills.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
23. Take a Pledge:
Pledge to stop food waste and make a commitment to that pledge. You’ll feel great when you take the pledge, and you’ll save money!

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
21. Reorganize Your Fridge:
When you know what is inside of the fridge it is much easier to reduce waste.

22. Stop Cooking so Much:
Know what you, and your family, will eat, and prepare only this amount when you cook.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
20. Freeze It:
When a product expiration date is nearing and you cannot prepare the item before this date, throw it in the freezer. Most items will last at least 30 more days when properly stored inside of the refrigerator.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
18. Measure: Measuring cups and measuring spoons are made to ensure that you insert the proper amount of ingredients not a recipe. Use these kitchen tools and you will find far less waste in your home.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
17. Grow Your Own: Gardening is a great pastime, and it can eliminate waste since you grow only what you need. If you have extra give it to friends, donate it to local organizations or sale it!

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
16. It’s the Time to Share: When eating out, share a meal with your friend or partner. Most of the time entrees are large enough to do this, and you’ll save money and reduce waste.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
15. Learn Why You Waste: In addition to keeping lists of the food that you are wasting, also learn why you are wasting them. When you write this list, perhaps include the reason the food was wasted to make this step easier.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
14. Here Kitty, Kitty: Okay, so may be the kitty isn’t the best animal to give the scraps too, but feeding the animals your leftovers is also a good idea that ensures nothing goes to waste.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
13. Stop Being so Picky:
f you are picky about the foods that you eat, it is going to cost you a lot more at the supermarket, and you’ll be spending unnecessary cash.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
12. Look at Product Sizes: Obviously a household of two will use less than a household of five, so make sure that you purchase according to your needs. Although it might seem like a good deal, if half of it is going to go to waste, is there really any savings?

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
11. Invite Friends Over For Dinner:
If you have a ton of food that needs to be cooked, why not invite friends over for dinner? Feeding someone is better than allowing it to go to waste, and you have a great chance to socialize!

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
10. Use Powdered Dairy Products:
They have a longer shelf life, they taste just as good, and they’re a lot cheaper. Where’s the ‘bad’ in this picture?

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
9. Take Inventory:
Before you go to the supermarket an make a purchase, take a quick inventory of the foods that you already have so not to repeat purchases.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
8. Learn Canning:
Learn canning and you can store pickles, cucumbers, tomatoes and more. This extends the lifetime and provides you with greater use for many foods.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
7. Keep Track of Waste:
Every day, write down the foods that you waste in your household; no matter the reason it was waste, make a note of it. At the end of the week, take a look at the amount of food that you are wasting. Maybe even add up the total cost of this wasted food. If this doesn’t convince you to straighten up, nothing will.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
6. Donate it:
If you’ve accumulated more food than what you can use before it expires, why not donate it to a worthy cause? There are many food banks and other centers in the local area that would appreciate your donation. And, it might be tax deductible.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
5. Is the Fridge Okay?
If your refrigerator is not performing at peak performance, it could cause your foods to go bad before they’re really ready. Make sure this is not an occurrence in your home.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
4. Store Foods Carefully: Many foods are wasted because they’ve become stale or lost their taste because they were not properly stored. Eliminate this woe by ensuring that you have many different containers to seal foods, as well as clips to hold packages together.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
3. Eat Leftovers: Rather than toss the leftovers from dinner, wrap them up and put them in the fried. Leftovers make great lunches for work and if you’re a small family, they’re just as great for second night meals. You get the benefit of not cooking so there is more time on your hands.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
2. Look at Expiration Dates: It is important to check expiration dates before you purchase a particular food item –and after it as well. Choose products to purchase with the furthers expiration dates and keep a close eye on them once you bring those groceries home, using the closest expiration dates first. Use dates with closer expiration dates first. Make this easier by moving these items to the front of your refrigerator and pantry. This reduces the food being thrown out because it is no longer safe to eat.

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Description of the earlier Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
1. Buy Only What You Need: If you prepare meals ahead of time it is easy to reduce the groceries you purchase each week by purchasing only what you need. If you’ll use three carrots and eight potatoes, buy this amount!

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Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
Digest this fact: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world. Cutting back on food waste is incredibly easy and here we are sharing with you 31 simple, easy and practical ways to avoid food waste and enjoy the benefits of that trait, including a wallet with more cash inside. These tips are easy to use no matter who you are so there is no excuse! Put these tips to work, and minimize the amount of food you are wasting before tonight’s dinner.

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Some points of Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
Would you believe that we waste enough food each year to feed more than one billion people?
Believe it, because it is a trusted statement. Americans, particularly, seem to waste just as much food as they consume. That’s a lot of money that you didn’t have to spend on top of it all. Don’t you want to do better? Don’t you want to be someone known for saving money, helping their environment, and wasting little?
No, do not keep eating long after you’re full and make yourself sick. But, do something about the amount of food that you are wasting!

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
26. Use Old Fruits & Veggies
27. Repackage Foods
28. Freeze Meals
29. Stop Snacking
30. Visit the Store Less Often
31. Eat Before you Shop

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
21. Reorganize Your Fridge
22. Stop Cooking so Much
23. Take a Pledge
24. Buy Funny Looking Products
25. Inspect Your Food

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
16. It’s the Time to Share
17. Grow Your Own
18. Measure
19. Plan Ahead
20. Freeze It

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
11. Invite Friends Over For Dinner
12. Look at Product Sizes
13. Stop Being so Picky
14. Here Kitty, Kitty
15. Learn Why You Waste

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
6. Donate it
7. Keep Track of Waste
8. Learn Canning
9. Take Inventory
10. Use Powdered Dairy Products

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Easy Ways To Reduce Food Waste
1. Buy Only What You Need
2. Look at Expiration Dates
3. Eat Leftovers
4. Store Foods Carefully
5. Is the Fridge Okay?

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Clean Out the Fridge Potato Salad
Follow these quick "1, 2, 3" steps!
1. Begin with cooked, diced potatoes (1-inch cube). Let them stand until cool enough to handle.

Tip: You can leave the skins on young, tender potatoes and other varieties of potatoes with a thin, delicate skin. There are over 100 varieties of potatoes. If uncertain about the best way to boil potatoes — and potatoes are a food that gets wasted at home.
2. While the potatoes are cooking/cooling, clean and prepare potential still-edible foods that might soon go in the garbage. Also, look for jars and packages of other still-edible foods that have been lingering in your refrigerator. Use your own preference as to amounts of ingredients. The salad in the photo contains red peppers, peas, onions, carrots, radishes, fresh dill and pickle relish.
3. The last step is combining the potatoes and vegetables with mayonnaise. Or, use your favorite homemade or purchased potato salad dressing. Then, chill your potato salad for about an hour before serving, to let the flavors meld.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
14. If you have several foods that might go to waste at the same time, try adding them to such adaptable recipes as salads, soups, pasta and casseroles.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
13. Donate safe, nutritious food to food banks, food pantries and food rescue programs.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
12. Check the garbage can. If the same foods are constantly being tossed: Eat them sooner, buy less of them, incorporate them into more recipes or freeze them. For more information on recommended storage period for pantry, refrigerator and freezer, check this guide with storage charts from Nebraska Extension .

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
11. Rather than buy a food for use in only one recipe, check if there might be a suitable substitute already in the home. The Cook's Thesaurus  gives thousands of ingredient substitutions.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
10. Buy misshapen fruits and vegetables at farmers' markets and elsewhere. They taste just as good and are just as nutritious as those with a "perfect" shape but are more likely to get thrown away.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
9. Look for recipes on websites that can be searched for by ingredients to use up food at home. USDA's "What's Cooking: USDA Mixing Bowl"  offers several tools for searching for recipes with specific ingredients, nutrition themes and meal course. To find more recipe websites, try using such search words as: "recipe websites that use ingredients you have at home (include these words in quotation marks).

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
8. Check product dates on foods. The United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service defines them as:
* • A "Sell-By" date tells the store how long to display the product for sale. You should buy the product before the date expires.
* • A "Best if Used By (or Before)" date is recommended for best flavor or quality. It is not a purchase or safety date.
* • A "Use-By" date is the last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality. The date has been determined by the manufacturer of the product. Do not buy or use baby formula after its "use-by" date.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
7. Compost food scraps for use in the garden. Visit Nebraska Extension for direction on creating compost for your garden.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
6. Dish up reasonable amounts of food at a buffet and go back for more if still hungry.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
5. Take restaurant leftovers home and refrigerate within two hours of being served. Eat within three to four days or freeze. Ask for a take home container at the beginning of the meal if portions look especially large. Remove take home food from your plate at the beginning of the meal so leftovers are as appetizing as the original meal rather than the picked-over remains. Or, choose a smaller size and/or split a dish with a dining companion.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
4. Freeze or can surplus fresh produce using safe, up-to-date food preservation methods. Visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation  for freezing and canning instructions.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
3. Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees F or below to prolong the life of foods. Foods frozen at 0 degrees F or lower will remain safe indefinitely but the quality will go down over time.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
2. Move older food products to the front of the fridge/cupboard/freezer and just-purchased ones to the back. This makes it more likely foods will be consumed before they go bad.

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Description of the earlier comments 14 points "ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted"
1. Shop the refrigerator before going to the store Use food at home before buying more. Designate one meal weekly as a "use-it-up" meal.

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The 14 ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted:
11. Rather than buy a food for use in only one recipe, check if there might be a suitable substitute already in the home.
12. Check the garbage can.
13. Donate safe, nutritious food
14. If you have several foods that might go to waste at the same time, try adding them to such adaptable recipes

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The 14 ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted:
5. Take restaurant leftovers home

6. Dish up reasonable amounts of food at a buffet

7. Compost food scraps for use in the garden.

8. Check product dates on foods.

9. Look for recipes on websites that can be searched for by ingredients to use up food at home.

10. Buy misshapen fruits and vegetables

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The 14 ways consumers can help reduce the amount of food wasted:
1. Shop the refrigerator before going to the store
2. Move older food products to the front
3. Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees F or below
4. Freeze or can surplus fresh produce

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Feeding the world will become more difficult in the future as 9 billion people are expected on the planet by 2050, compared to a world population of around 7 billion people in 2015. Developing habits to save more of the food we already have will put less strain on the resources associated with producing and buying food and aid in reducing the creation of greenhouse gas emissions.

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The Environmental Protection Agency estimates food wastes at almost 14 percent of the total municipal solid wastes in the United States in 2010, with less than 3 percent recovered and recycled. Food in landfills decomposes to produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

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This amount of food waste is among the highest globally. Preventing food waste saves money and resources. Resources used to produce uneaten food include: 30 percent of fertilizer, 31 percent of cropland, 25 percent of total fresh water consumption and 2 percent of total energy consumption.

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Ways Consumers Can Reduce Food Waste

About 40 percent of the United States food supply (1,500 calories/ person/day) goes uneaten. Discarded food in homes and food service accounts for 60 percent of this total food loss and is mostly avoidable. The remaining portion is lost or wasted during food production.

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practical ways you can reduce food waste and save money
Save – and actually eat – leftovers.
In the same vein, make sure you save uneaten food when you either cook too much or you get too much food at a restaurant. Label your leftovers so you can keep track of how long they've been in your fridge or freezer, and incorporate them into your daily or weekly routine.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"

*During Mealtime*
19.Educate other people.
sure, nobody likes a Debbie Downer at the dinner table. But turns out simply being aware of the issue of food waste can help make people more attentive to wasting less

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
*During Mealtime*
18.Go tray less.
When eating in a cafeteria, skip the tray. Doing so is associated with a reduction in food waste, possibly because it’s harder for people to carry more food than they can actually eat.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"

*During Mealtime*
17.Share.
Made a quadruple recipe of a casserole you ended up disliking? Gift it to friends, family, or neighbors — they’re likely to be grateful for the saved money and time.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
*During Mealtime*
16.Take home leftovers.
Even if you’re not into splitting meals, those portion sizes don’t have to be wasted. Just ask to take leftovers home (bonus eco points if you bring your own reusable container!), and you’ve got yourself a free lunch the next day.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"

*During Mealtime*
15.Split the dish.
If eating out, split a dish with a friend so you don’t waste half of the giant portion sizes found at many restaurants.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
*During Mealtime*

14. Check in with your belly.
Here it is, ladies and gentlemen: The solution to the “clean your plate!” issue. Simply take a moment to ask your body what it wants to eat, and how much — and then serve yourself that. Or simply start with less food on your plate. If you want more, you can always go back for it — but this way you won’t find out that you’re full and still have a heap of food in front of you. In fact, one study found that reducing portion sizes is an easy way to reduce food waste .

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
13.Compost!
Hate potato skins? Don’t feel like turning wilted vegetables into soup stock? No worries; food scraps still don’t need to be tossed. Just start a compost pile in the backyard or even under the sink, and convert food waste into a useful resource.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
12.Understand expiration dates.
Turns out those expiration dates don’t always have to do with food safety; rather, they’re usually manufacturers’ suggestions for peak quality. If stored properly, most foods (even meat) stay fresh several days past the “use-by” date. If a food looks, smells, and tastes okay, it should be fine. If any of these elements are off, then it’s time to toss it.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
11.Pickle it.
Both fruits and vegetables can be preserved through an easy pickling process.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
10.Can it. Got more fruit than you know what to do with? Try canning it so it’ll last for months to come. (Plus, who doesn’t love eating “fresh” peaches in winter?)

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
9.Store things properly in the freezer.
Same as above: How and where we store products in the freezer makes a difference in how long they’ll last.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
8.Store food properly in the fridge.
Learn how and where to store specific products in the fridge, and they’re likely to keep longer (hint: they don’t call it the “produce drawer” for nothin’!).

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
7.Donate the gross stuff, too!
Many farmers happily accept food scraps for feeding pigs or adding to a compost heap. To find farms near you, check out one of these resources.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
6.Donate what you won’t use.
Never going to eat that can of beans? Donate it to a food kitchen before it expires so it can be consumed by someone who needs it. Check out this resource to locate a food bank near you.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
5.. Preserve produce.
Produce doesn’t have to be tossed just because it’s reaching the end of its peak. Soft fruit can be used in smoothies; wilting vegetables can be used in soups, etc. And both wilting fruits and veggies can be turned into delicious,nutritious juice.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
4.Check the fridge.
Make sure it’s functioning at maximum efficiency. Look for tight seals, proper temperature, etc. — this will ensure that the fridge keeps food fresh as long as possible.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
3.Repurpose leftovers scraps.
Use vegetable and meat scraps in homemade stocks, and use citrus fruit rinds and zest to add flavor to other meals. Want more ideas? Check out these resources for using up food scraps.

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
2.Store better. If you regularly throw away stale chips/cereal/crackers/etc., try storing them in airtight containers— this should help them keep longer (or, of course, just buy fewer of these products).

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Description of earlier comments point "Smart and Easy Tips Reduce Food Waste"
1. Use it all.
When cooking, use every piece of whatever food you’re cooking with, whenever possible. For example, leave the skin on cucumbers and potatoes, sauté broccoli stems along with the florets (they taste good too; we promise!), and so on. Bonus: Skins and stems often have provide additional nutrients for our bodies

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Smart and Easy Tips point to Reduce Food Waste
*During Mealtime*
16.Take home leftovers.
17.Share.
18.Go tray less.
19.Educate other people.

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Smart and Easy Tips point to Reduce Food Waste
11.Pickle it.
12.Understand expiration dates.
13.Compost!
*During Mealtime*
14.Check in with your belly.
15.Split the dish.

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Smart and Easy Tips point to Reduce Food Waste
6.Donate what you won’t use.
7.Donate the gross stuff, too!
8.Store food properly in the fridge.
9.Store things properly in the freezer.
10.Can it.

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Smart and Easy Tips point to Reduce Food Waste
1.Use it all.
2.Store better.
3.Repurpose leftovers scraps.
4.Check the fridge.
5.Preserve produce.

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Food Preservation: Methods of Preserving Food
All these methods work by altering conditions like temperature, availability of water or oxygen in the food, or in the environment in which the food is stored. Changing or altering these factors hinders the growth of these minute organisms, and hence prevents food spoilage.

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Food Preservation: Methods of Preserving Food
Food preserving is a method of storing both raw and cooked food for an extended time by using food preservatives. Food packaging on the other hand, protects food and provides information regarding the packaged food. Food preservatives are substances added to food products to prevent decomposition due to adverse chemical change or microbial action. The main objective behind using food preservatives is to preserve the appearance, texture, flavor, edibility and nutritive value of the foods and also to prevent from food poisoning.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
7.Pickling: Cucumber, beef, peppers and some vegetables may be preserved by pickling. This technique involves dipping the food in some liquid chemical that prevents the growth of micro-organisms but still maintains edibility of the food. The preserving liquids used are vinegar, brine, alcohol and some other oils. This process is known as chemical pickling. The other way of pickling is by fermentation. In fermentation pickling, the preservation agent is produced by the food itself during the process of fermentation.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
6.Salting: Salt is a natural food preservative that draws out moisture from the food as well as from the cells of the micro-organisms that may be present in it. Lack of moisture kills these organisms and hence prevents food spoilage. Salt is commonly used as a preservative in meat products.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
5.Sugaring: Sugaring is used to preserve fruits like apples, apricots and plums in sugary syrup that dehydrates the foods. The skin of certain fruits are cooked in sugar till they crystallize and then they are stored in a dry environment.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
4.Vacuum Treatment: In this method food is stored in airtight containers that strips bacteria of the oxygen that helps it carry on with its metabolism. Hence, the growth of these micro-organisms is arrested and food is preserved. Nuts are usually preserved by this method.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
3.Canning: In this process, the food is first processed and then sealed in airtight containers. While the micro-organisms are killed by processing the food, their entry and proliferation is restricted by canning it in an airtight environment. The various methods used to process the food before it is canned are pasteurization, boiling, freezing or vacuum treatment.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food
2.Freezing: Micro-organisms require a certain level of temperature for their survival. Freezing foods lowers the temperature to levels that make the environment unsuitable for microbial growth. This is the principle on which home refrigerators work. Cold stores are used to preserve large amounts of food stuff for a longer period of time, so that they can be used during a natural calamity or national emergency. The only drawback of this food preserving technique is its dependence on electricity.

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Description of earlier comments for Preserving Food 
1.Drying: This is one of the oldest methods of food preservation. This process acts by reducing the moisture content in the food which in turn arrests bacterial growth. Drying is largely used for preserving meat. However, fruits and vegetables can also be preserved by this method. The additional advantage of drying is that it reduces the size and weight of the food product, therefore making it more portable. Sun drying, oven drying, and drying with the help of a dehydrator are the various ways used to reduce the water content of food.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At Home)
10. Eat leftovers! Brown-bag them for work or school for a free packed lunch. If you don’t want to eat leftovers the day after they’re cooked, freeze and save them for later (just remember to note when you froze them so you can use them up in a timely fashion).

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At Home)
9. Designate one dinner each week as a “use-it-up” meal. Instead of cooking a new meal, look around in the cupboards and fridge for leftovers and other food that might otherwise get overlooked.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At Home)
8. Take stock. Note upcoming expiration dates on foods you already have at home, and plan meals around the products that are closest to their expiration. On a similar note, keep a list of what’s in the freezer and when each item was frozen. Place this on the freezer door for easy reference and use items before they pass their prime.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At Home)
7. Monitor what you throw away. Designate a week in which you write down everything you throw out on a regular basis. Tossing half a loaf of bread each week? Maybe it’s time to start freezing half that loaf the moment you buy it so it doesn’t go stale before you’re able to eat it.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At Home)
6. Practice FIFO. It stands for First In, First Out. When unpacking groceries, move older products to the front of the fridge/freezer/pantry and put new products in the back. This way, you’re more likely to use up the older stuff before it expires.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At the Store)
5. Have a Plan B. Let’s say you buy Camembert to make a fancy dish for that fancy dinner party — and then the dinner party is canceled. Don’t toss the cheese! Instead, come up with a backup recipe and use it in a different dish (or just eat it plain, because c’mon — it’s cheese).

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At the Store)
4. Buy funny-looking produce. Many fruits and vegetables are thrown away because their size, shape, or colors don’t quite match what we think these items “should” look like. But for the most part these items are perfectly good to eat, and buying them at a farmer’s market or the grocery store helps use up food that might otherwise be tossed.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At the Store)
3. Be realistic. If you live alone, you won’t need the same number of apples as a family of four (unless you really like apples). If you rarely cook, don’t stock up on goods that have to be cooked in order to be consumed (such as baking supplies or dried grains and beans).

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan (At the Store)
2. Buy exactly what you need. For example, if a recipe calls for two carrots, don’t buy a whole bag. Instead, buy loose produce so you can purchase the exact number you’ll use. Likewise, try buying grains, nuts, and spices from bulk bins so you can measure out exactly what you need and don’t over-buy (Just note that there's a difference between buying in bulk and buying from bulk bins; the first one can actually create more waste if we buy more than we can realistically use). Bonus: This tip will save some cash, to boot.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan
(At the Store)
1. Shop smart. Plan meals, use grocery lists, and avoid impulse buys. This way, you’re less likely to buy things you don’t need and that you’re unlikely to actually consume. Buy items only when you have a plan for using them, and wait until perishables are all used up before buying more. Check out these apps for extra-easy meal planning.

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Befriend your fridge - 70% of our fridges are set at too high a temperature.


Store food according to the instructions on pack - leaving food out of the fridge can cut the life of foods like milk, cooked meats and salad by up to 100%.

Keep your fridge between 1-5°C - this helps you get the best from your food. If your fridge doesn’t indicate actual temperature, think about investing in a fridge thermometer.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan
At the Store
1. Shop smart.
2. Buy exactly what you need.
3. Be realistic.
4. Buy funny-looking produce.
5. Have a Plan B.

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Think before you shop - more than a third of us go shopping without a list.


Check what you have at home before you shop.

Make a list - it saves time and money.

hop with meals in mind - you’ll end up throwing less away.

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Use or lose your food - 60% of us end up throwing away food because it’s passed its ‘use-by’ date.


Plan your meals with the ‘use-by’ date in mind - it will save you money.

Know your fridge - keep an eye on what’s inside. Be mindful of the perishable food you have and plan meals to fit in with their ‘use-by’ dates. This will prevent unnecessary waste.

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Waste Not — Your Action Plan
At Home
6. Practice FIFO.
7. Monitor what you throw away.
8. Take stock.
9. Designate one dinner each week as a “use-it-up” meal.
10. Eat leftovers!

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Now that we’re all sufficiently depressed, it’s time for the good news: We as individuals can implement small changes that make a big difference in the amount of food we throw away each year. Just pick and choose from our list of tips for reducing food waste below (or go hog wild and do them all!).

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All those groceries in the trash add up to almost $165 billion lost annually, not to mention the environmental resources that are wasted on growing food that’s thrown away. Wasted food creates billions of tons of greenhouse gases (major culprits in climate change) and needlessly consumes precious land and water resources. All of these numbers are so startling that the U.N. has recently begun a new global campaign, Think Eat Save, dedicated to combating food wasted by consumers, retailers, and the hospitality industry.

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Food loss occurs when food is thrown out or somehow decreases in quality during processing (i.e., before it hits supermarket shelves); it’s mostly an issue in so-called developing countries. Food waste, on the other hand, tends to be a major issue in “developed” countries such as the U.S. It refers to situations when food makes it to the end of the food supply chain but still doesn’t get consumed. Currently, one third of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally. That’s about 1.3 billion tons of nom-worthy edibles per year, and less than a quarter of it could feed hungry people the world over.

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Supply Chain: Whatever goes into a restaurant or food service facility should be designed to be 1) reusable, 2)
recyclable OR 3) compostable. If any component of an item sent into a restaurant does not fall into one of these
three categories, there is no option but to discard it - resulting in waste.

Operations: Restaurant staff should be provided with 1) as many reusable food prep and guest service items as
possible, 2) convenient and clearly marked storage containers in which to place the recyclable and compostable
materials and 3) comprehensive training on processes and material types.

Facilities Management: Hauling services or reverse logistics should be available at the restaurant(s) to haul away 1)
items for reuse, 2) recyclables and 3) compostable material.

Food service organizations and restaurants have opportunities to reduce their costs, engage their guests, and
demonstrate a commitment to their local community by reducing the amount of waste sent to the landfill. Actions
taken by restaurants allow them to demonstrate leadership and show their employees and other stakeholders their
commitment to reduce waste and help the environment.

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Types of waste tracked:


Kitchen (Back-of-the-House)


Packaging


Plate (Front-of-the-House)
It can help measure:


Amounts and types of wasted food and related
packaging;


Primary causes of waste generation; and


Patterns of waste generation (through automatically
generated graphs and summary data)
.

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Quality Losses: Where losses occur due to failure to meet specifications for food safety or quality standards. In the
most extreme, these can result in product recalls where a food safety risk is evident. Quality losses are generally
evident in finished goods that are not suitable for sale, so they can be the most costly to deal with. For one,
manufacturers have already invested in all of the raw material, package, labor and plant inputs to create a product
that cannot be sold. In addition, once a product is packaged, it is more difficult to separate the food and the
packaging to be able to recycle the materials, so these are more likely to be disposed of in landfills. Quality losses
are preventable with good quality systems, training and ongoing monitoring of quality standards

In all cases described above, food manufacturers have enormous opportunity to improve bottom line profitability
by reducing the generation of waste. Each pound of waste generated represents a pound of raw material that was
purchased with the intent of creating a product that would generate revenue. So reducing waste means companies
get more of what they pay for and have more product to sell.

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Benefits of Reducing Wasted Food and Packaging


Save money by reducing over-purchasing and
disposal costs


Reduce environmental impacts


Support efforts to eliminate hunger


Reduce health and odor concerns with food disposal


Support community waste reduction efforts


Increase tax benefits by donating food

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Waste by Design: Where a product is developed and specified to have some kind of loss involved. These design
decisions can be a result of meeting consumer demands or expectations, food safety reasons or other factors.
For example, canned tomatoes are almost universally peeled and seeded before packaging, that residual tomato
material (skins & seeds), also known as pomace, is considered a design loss in tomato processing. Fortunately
it makes a really good animal feed! Opportunities for reducing design wastes often rely on challenging consumer
norms and expectations to get more out of raw material inputs.

Yield Losses: Where routine situations occur that prevent the use of all of the raw materials purchased for use
in production. These situations can be acute events such as a loss in transportation due to damage or spillage
of incoming raw materials or due to forecasting errors that result in materials going bad or being too old to use.
They can also be chronic and ongoing due to inefficient or poorly designed processing equipment or procedures
that can cause losses during manufacturing. Often the biggest opportunities for waste reduction are when those
chronic losses can be identified and targeted.

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Food service establishments generate a significant amount of wasted
food and packaging. Between 4 and 10 percent of food purchased by
food service operations in the U
.S . is thrown out before reaching the
plate
.
1
By reducing the amount of food and packaging discarded, they
can significantly reduce their waste stream and save money.

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waste reduction would imply using less of fuels for refrigeration, transportation purposes thus preserving the environment. In the process of reducing waste, the society awakens about the sensitive and unrealized issue of food wastage and contributes thus making a positive move towards Food Security .

If the resulting bio-waste is not thrown away into landfills but is rather reused and recycled, green house gases like methane which is more harmful than CO2, can be debarred from deteriorating the environment.

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If consumers have a fair idea and keep a track of what percentage of food purchased gets discarded as pre-consumer waste, costs can be saved on various fronts like labour, disposal and goods purchased. By increasing individual savings, food waste prevention contributes towards better community.
Reducing food waste disposal at landfills is an important part of the Government’s plan for waste management and the Administration has adopted a multi-pronged approach to tackle Hong Kong’s food waste problem, with main focus on avoidance of food waste generation and reduction at source.

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Food waste, like other waste can be dumped but could also be used for various other purposes such as feeding animals or be biodegraded by various methods such as a composting and used for soil enrichment.
A lot of food waste is created post harvest due to the lack of infrastructural facilities such as cold chain provisions, transportation and proper storage facilities.
Food waste can be tackled in more effective ways, with the help of various schematic and planned methods implemented by the governments and private firms simultaneously.Though a lot of the food waste caused due to the food processing can be difficult to reduce without affecting the quality of the finished product, certain incentives must be provided by the administrative bodies, to look to reduce this form of food waste.

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This does not capture the full picture: for example, meat accounts for about 4% of food wastage but 20% of the costs, while 70% of fruit and vegetable output is wasted, accounting for 40% of the total cost. India may be the world’s largest milk producer and grow the second largest quantity of fruits and vegetables (after China), but it is also the world’s biggest waster of food. As a result, fruit and vegetable prices are twice what they would be otherwise, and milk costs 50% more than it should.

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In developing nations on account of improved standards of living and changing consumption patterns. The growing population and increasing consumer demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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In developing countries food waste and losses occur mainly at early stages of the food value chain and can be traced back to financial, managerial and technical constraints in harvesting techniques as well as storage and cooling facilities. Strengthening the supply chain through the direct support of farmers and investments in infrastructure, transportation, as well as in an expansion of the food and packaging industry could help to reduce the amount of food loss and waste.

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Food loss and waste also amount to a major squandering of resources, including water, land, energy, labour and capital and needlessly produce greenhouse gas emissions, contributing to global warming and climate change.
The food currently lost or wasted in Latin America could feed 300 million people.
The food currently wasted in Europe could feed 200 million people.
The food currently lost in Africa could feed 300 million people.
Even if just one-fourth of the food currently lost or wasted globally could be saved, it would be enough to feed 870 million hungry people in the world.

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Every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million tonnes) as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tonnes).
The amount of food lost or wasted every year is equivalent to more than half of the world's annual cereals crop (2.3 billion tonnes in 2009/2010).
Per capita waste by consumers is between 95-115 kg a year in Europe and North America, while consumers in sub-Saharan Africa, south and south-eastern Asia, each throw away only 6-11 kg a year.

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losses and waste amounts to roughly US$ 680 billion in industrialized countries and US$ 310 billion in developing countries.
Industrialized and developing countries dissipate roughly the same quantities of food — respectively 670 and 630 million tonnes.

Fruits and vegetables, plus roots and tubers have the highest wastage rates of any food.
Global quantitative food losses and waste per year are roughly 30% for cereals, 40-50% for root crops, fruits and vegetables, 20% for oil seeds, meat and dairy plus 35% for fish.

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Demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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The growing population and increasing consumer demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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The growing population and increasing consumer demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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The depth of the problem is such that the impact of these efforts is hardly up to the mark. In order to make progress in reducing the burden of this problem, the Government needs to primarily contain the excessive wastage in transportation and improve storage facilities that are currently 50 per cent less than required. Besides this, the Government must also focus on food processing technologies that are both advanced and affordable so that food preservation practices can be encouraged thereby saving food from wastage.

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That is minimal and hence a small contributor to the larger picture of food waste and the aforesaid issues. But, food waste alone incurs huge monetary losses to industries and mankind, in general.
Food waste primarily revolves around any form of food, raw or cooked, used or unused – discarded or intended so.

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IT will be  greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Plus the costs for collecting, transporting and land filling the excess food come from the taxpayers. The good news is that some simple lifestyle adjustments offer huge payoffs for your family, community and the planet.

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India can be effectively evaded by good food waste management practices. If consumers have a fair idea and keep a track of what percentage of food purchased gets discarded as pre-consumer waste, costs can be saved on various fronts like labour, disposal and goods purchased. By increasing individual savings, food waste prevention contributes towards better community. If the resulting bio-waste is not thrown away into landfills but is rather reused and recycled, green house gases like methane which is more harmful than CO2, can be debarred from deteriorating the environment. Also waste reduction would imply using less of fuels for refrigeration, transportation purposes thus preserving the environment. In the process of reducing waste, the society awakens about the sensitive and unrealized issue of food wastage and contributes thus making a positive move towards Food Security .

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The Environmental Protection Agency estimates food wastes at almost 14 percent of the total municipal solid wastes in the United States in 2010, with less than 3 percent recovered and recycled. Food in landfills decomposes to produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

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Everyone creates wasted food, but it is just as simple to not create it. Both businesses and individuals can learn to effectively prevent the flow of wasted food by taking simple steps such as making grocery lists, inventorying supplies, and buying less.

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This amount of food waste is among the highest globally. Preventing food waste saves money and resources. Resources used to produce uneaten food include: 30 percent of fertilizer, 31 percent of cropland, 25 percent of total fresh water consumption and 2 percent of total energy consumption.

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Freeze food such as bread, sliced fruit, or meat that you know you won’t be able to eat in time.
Cut your time in the kitchen by preparing and freezing meals ahead of time.
Prepare and cook perishable items, then freeze them for use throughout the month.
For example, bake and freeze chicken breasts or fry and freeze taco meat.

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Most of the waste occurs at the distribution and consumption stages, with one-third of foods being discarded in the home and by the food service industry (see Figure 1). In comparison, food loss in low-income countries is concentrated during production and post harvest. For example, in developing countries, when calculated by weight, 44 percent of fruits and vegetables, 20 percent of roots and tuber crops, and 19 percent of cereals, legumes, and pulses are lost before even reaching the consumption stage.

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However, its ramifications are relatively more pronounced in developing nations on account of improved standards of living and changing consumption patterns. The growing population and increasing consumer demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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Preventing wasted food is a matter of implementing better habits:
Compare purchasing inventory with customer ordering.
Modify menus to increase customer satisfaction and prevent and reduce uneaten food.
Examine production and handling practices to prevent and reduce preparation waste.
Ensure proper storage techniques.
Be creative with your kitchen excess. Surplus or excess food can be used in new dishes. For example, stale bread can become croutons; fruit can become a dessert topping; and vegetable trimmings can be used in soups, sauces, and stocks.

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Prevent pollution related to food production, such as fertilizers and pesticides, and save energy associated with growing, preparing, and transporting food.
Reduce methane emissions from landfills.
Save money by buying only what is needed and by avoiding disposal costs.
Save labor costs through more efficient handling, preparation, and storage of food that will actually be used.

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Learn about what flows through your kitchen by measuring the amount, type, and reason for the generation of wasted food. Knowing how much and why wasted food is generated will help to create effective wasted food prevention strategies. It will also help to identify wasted food that is avoided and money saved. This analysis is called a waste audit.

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Everyone creates wasted food, but it is just as simple to not create it. Both businesses and individuals can learn to effectively prevent the flow of wasted food by taking simple steps such as making grocery lists, inventorying supplies, and buying less.

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The top levels of the hierarchy are the best ways to prevent and divert wasted food because they create the most benefits for the environment, society and the economy. Click on the links below to learn more about the tiers of the hierarchy.

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The Food Recovery Hierarchy prioritizes actions organizations can take to prevent and divert wasted food. Each tier of the Food Recovery Hierarchy focuses on different management strategies for your wasted food.

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The world faced an analogous situation in the 1970s with the energy crisis. In the face of record oil prices and growing demand, several industrialized nations essentially declared war on energy wastefulness, significantly improving their energy efficiency. A “war on waste” has yet to be waged when it comes to food. Given that food prices have hit historic highs and global demand continues to rise, now is the time to start slashing food waste and loss.

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On food waste reduction, we believe that education and publicity are very important. Over the past years, the Government has initiated and supported various programmes and educational campaigns to promote food waste reduction, source separation and recycling in different sectors and districts. Some of our recent actions include:

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Reducing food loss and waste is an important part of ending hunger. The earth cannot sustain the current practice of producing nearly twice as much food each year as necessary for consumption, then throwing half of it away. Whenever food is wasted, so are the land, seeds, agricultural inputs, water, energy, and labor resources that went into producing it.
Ending hunger requires more than increasing production and total food supply. It will require the improvement of local food systems, a full understanding of the local conditions and factors affecting the value chains for foods, and more attention to the barriers limiting investment in improved postharvest handling practices, technologies, and policy. Although many postharvest innovations have been identified and are being promoted across the globe, more local capacity building, research support, and knowledge dissemination are needed to reduce food losses and end hunger.

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The characteristics of food loss and waste vary greatly by region, type of crop or food product, and income. In middle- and high-income countries, most of the waste occurs at the distribution and consumption stages, with one-third of foods being discarded in the home and by the food service industry (see Figure 1). In comparison, food loss in low-income countries is concentrated during production and post harvest. For example, in developing countries, when calculated by weight, 44 percent of fruits and vegetables, 20 percent of roots and tuber crops, and 19 percent of cereals, legumes, and pulses are lost before even reaching the consumption stage.

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1 Separate your food waste – put your food waste into a separate container to see how much you really waste







2 Record your waste – to remember the food you throw out, make a note of it.









3 Identify the reasons – If you know what and why you throw out, you can work towards stopping it.

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Befriend your freezer and visit it often. For example,

Freeze food such as bread, sliced fruit, or meat that you know you won’t be able to eat in time.
Cut your time in the kitchen by preparing and freezing meals ahead of time.
Prepare and cook perishable items, then freeze them for use throughout the month.
For example, bake and freeze chicken breasts or fry and freeze taco meat.

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Prepare perishable foods soon after shopping. It will be easier to whip up meals or snacks later in the week, saving time, effort, and money.

When you get home from the store, take the time to wash, dry, chop, dice, slice, and place your fresh food items in clear storage containers for snacks and easy cooking.

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Wait to wash berries until you want to eat them to prevent mold.
If you like to eat fruit at room temperature, but it should be stored in the refrigerator for maximum freshness, take what you’ll eat for the day out of the refrigerator in the morning.

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By simply making a list with weekly meals in mind, you can save money and time and eat healthier food. If you buy no more than what you expect to use, you will be more likely to keep it fresh and use it all.

Keep a running list of meals and their ingredients that your household already enjoys. That way, you can easily choose, shop for and prepare meals.

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Make your shopping list based on how many meals you’ll eat at home. Will you eat out this week? How often?
Plan your meals for the week before you go shopping and buy only the things needed for those meals.

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Include quantities on your shopping list noting how many meals you’ll make with each item to avoid overbuying. For example: salad greens - enough for two lunches.
Look in your refrigerator and cupboards first to avoid buying food you already have, make a list each week of what needs to be used up and plan upcoming meals around it.

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Buy only what you need and will use. Buying in bulk only saves money if you are able to use the food before it spoils.
It is easy to overbuy or forget about fresh fruits and vegetables. Store fruits and vegetables for maximum freshness; they’ll taste better and last longer, helping you to eat more of them.

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Buy only what you need and will use. Buying in bulk only saves money if you are able to use the food before it spoils.
It is easy to overbuy or forget about fresh fruits and vegetables. Store fruits and vegetables for maximum freshness; they’ll taste better and last longer, helping you to eat more of them.

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The new methodology of field case studies goes deeper in the complex subject matter of FL, finds the symptoms, causes and reasons for the causes of FL, discloses interactions along the food supply chains, and above all assesses the feasibility of solutions against the background reality of social structures, cultural habits, the climate and environment, the contribution to nutrition and food security.

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The project supported the development of a new methodology to assess the extent, causes, impact of food losses and solutions. In the past 40 years the classical approach to reduce postharvest losses was based on statistical surveys and rural appraisals, followed by technology interventions and economic analysis. This appeared not to be sufficiently successful.

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If the resulting bio-waste is not thrown away into landfills but is rather reused and recycled, green house gases like methane which is more harmful than CO2, can be debarred from deteriorating the environment. Also waste reduction would imply using less of fuels for refrigeration, transportation purposes thus preserving the environment. In the process of reducing waste, the society awakens about the sensitive and unrealized issue of food wastage and contributes thus making a positive move towards Food Security .

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India’s wealthy surge with rapid economic growth, many families are staging extravagant displays of food at their children’s weddings to show off their newfound affluence.
The prodigious waste that follows has horrified many in a nation where food prices are skyrocketing and tens of millions of young children are malnourished.
one-fifth of the food served at weddings and social gatherings is discarded, ”It’s a criminal waste,” The tons of food wasted at social gatherings across the country each day contrasts sharply with the food shortages, often bordering on chronic starvation, faced by millions of poor Indians..

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The most significant factor – one that policymakers have long ignored – is that a high proportion of the food that India produces never reaches consumers. Sharad Pawar, a former agriculture minister, has noted that food worth $8.3 billion, or nearly 40% of the total value of annual production, is wasted.

This does not capture the full picture: for example, meat accounts for about 4% of food wastage but 20% of the costs, while 70% of fruit and vegetable output is wasted, accounting for 40% of the total cost. India may be the world’s largest milk producer and grow the second largest quantity of fruits and vegetables (after China), but it is also the world’s biggest waster of food. As a result, fruit and vegetable prices are twice what they would be otherwise, and milk costs 50% more than it should.

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It is not only perishable food that is squandered. An estimated 21 million tons of wheat – equivalent to Australia’s entire annual crop – rots or is eaten by insects, owing to inadequate storage and poor management at the government-run Food Corporation of India (FCI). Food-price inflation since 2008-2009 has been consistently above 10%, (except for 2010-2011, when it was “only” 6.2%); the poor, whose grocery bills typically account for 31% of the household budget, have suffered the most.

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There are several reasons why so much perishable food is lost, including the absence of modern food distribution chains, too few cold-storage centers and refrigerated trucks, poor transportation facilities, erratic electricity supply, and the lack of incentives to invest in the sector. The Indian Institute of Management in Kolkata estimates that cold-storage facilities are available for only 10% of perishable food products, leaving around 370 million tons of perishable products at risk.

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It is estimated more than 230 cubic kilometers of fresh water, enough to provide drinking water to 10 crore people a year, goes into producing food items that are ultimately wasted. China is second with 140 cubic km and Pakistan third with 55 cubic km.

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When it comes to wasting food items, India is ahead of China, says a UN report on food waste and its impact on natural resources.

The grim news comes at a time when prices of most vegetables and fruits are high. The waste also takes a high toll on the country’s natural resources because many of these items, rice for example, consume large quantities of water.

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The World Economic Forum warns that food shortages represent one of the biggest risks to global stability over the next decade as countries are increasingly affected by climate change. Even though the world produces enough food to feed twice the world’s present population, food wastage is ironically behind the billions of people who are malnourished. It is time to recognise this colossal scale of waste and take appropriate action that not only benefits humanity but the environment as well.

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In addition to these efforts, the Government must make it mandatory for the food retailers across the country to adopt technology standards that allow incentives for the customer to purchase perishable products that are approaching their expiration dates. This will help reduce food wastage, maximises grocery retailer revenue, and effectively reduces the global carbon footprint.

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India should also take a cue from global practices that are both unorthodox and innovative in order to tackle food wastage problem. For instance, France has passed unanimous legislation requiring supermarkets to either give unsold food to charity or send it to farmers for use as feed and fertiliser.

Similarly, institutions in Canada are recovering unused and unspoiled food from retailers, manufacturers, restaurants and caterers and sending them to charities, in the process delivering ingredients for over 22,000 meals daily. These powerful initiatives have made a big difference in how these countries have approached a vexing issue.

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Besides this, nearly300 million barrels of oil used to produce food is also ultimately wasted. Taking all of it into consideration, the actual worth of money per year in India from food wastage is estimated at a whopping Rs58,000 crore.

The Government has made many efforts to rein in food wastage but clearly, the depth of the problem is such that the impact of these efforts is hardly up to the mark. In order to make progress in reducing the burden of this problem, the Government needs to primarily contain the excessive wastage in transportation and improve storage facilities that are currently 50 per cent less than required. Besides this, the Government must also focus on food processing technologies that are both advanced and affordable so that food preservation practices can be encouraged thereby saving food from wastage.

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Apart from the wastage of the food produced, the resources lost in the form of inputs during food production are also considerable. For instance, 25 per cent of fresh water, used to produce food, is ultimately wasted, even as millions of people still don’t have access to drinking water. In addition, approximately 45 per cent of India’s land is degraded primarily due to deforestation, unsustainable agricultural practices, and excessive groundwater extraction to meet the food demand.

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A recent study conducted by Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata, revealed that only 10 per cent of foods get cold storage facility in India, this factor, accompanied by inappropriate supply chain management, has resulted in India becoming a significant contributor towards food wastage both at pre and post harvest waste in cereals, pulses, fruits and vegetables. India ranks 63 among 88 countries in Global Hunger Index with 20 crore Indians sleeping hungry on any given night, but in spite of this, nearly 21 million tonnes of wheat are wasted in India each year instead of reaching the needy.

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At the consumer level, we can reduce our contribution to food and energy waste by taking simple, basic steps at home, in the grocery store and at restaurants.


For starters, plan a food menu before each trip to the grocery store so it’s easier to keep track of when vegetables, fruits and other perishables need to be eaten throughout the week.

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Food waste has serious implications for society. Consumers unnecessarily spend a lot of time and money on food they don't eat. Rotting food also pumps heaps of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Plus the costs for collecting, transporting and land filling the excess food come from the taxpayers. The good news is that some simple lifestyle adjustments offer huge payoffs for your family, community and the planet.

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The problem of waste management runs across geographies and its gravest causal agent, i.e., urbanism, is a global phenomenon. However, its ramifications are relatively more pronounced in developing nations on account of improved standards of living and changing consumption patterns. The growing population and increasing consumer demand are leading to excessive consumption of available resources and generation of tremendous amount of different kind of wastes, which is emerging as a chronic problem in urban societies. Their efficient management is needed at the earliest to avoid numerous problems related to public and environmental health.

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The following countries are the countries that are affected the most by food deprivation: Africa, India, and Pakistan. Many of the people affected by food waste are little children; about 5 million children die of starvation per year. Tons of food is dumped to landfills each year when the food thrown away is edible. The people around the world who starve can be saved and can be fed. What needs to happen is that people need to send more food to these people. Ones who are affected the most are little children who only eat a meal once a day. If supermarkets along with other food industries gather up, together they could save many lives and also save money.

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The business case for reducing food loss and waste is
clear and will require strong leadership by the private
sector to achieve both innovation and diffusion at
scale. At the United Nations Climate Summit 2014
many of the largest global food companies made
a commitment to partner with farmers to reduce
emissions and build resilience to climate change.
Reducing food loss and waste must be part of
the strategy.

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ÔØØIf we reduce food loss and waste
to zero it would give us additional
food to feed 2 billion people We
already know a lot about how to cut
food losses. But we need to invest
more in a number of areas, especially
in infrastructure such as roads and
cold chains, but also improving market
information. We also need to close
the gap between the knowledge we
have and what farmers and other
actors in the food chain are actually
doing. When we do that, we see
good results.ÔØ×

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Private sector initiatives
The International Food Waste Coalition is a multistakeholder
initiative in the food-service industry
to tackle food waste in the value chain. Sodexo, a
member of the coalition, leads the Stop Wasting
Food Campaign among colleges and universities.

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 The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

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If you remember your last restaurant visit and compare that with overall statistics of food wastage in India alone, you would want to go back and lick your plate clean – and maybe even the utensils, the food was served in. But, the lack of awareness around the issue and interrelated issues, such as malnutrition, poverty and food shortage, is minimal and hence a small contributor to the larger picture of food waste and the aforesaid issues. But, food waste alone incurs huge monetary losses to industries and mankind, in general.
Food waste primarily revolves around any form of food, raw or cooked, used or unused – discarded or intended so.

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Even the utensils, the food was served in. But, the lack of awareness around the issue and interrelated issues, such as malnutrition, poverty and food shortage, is minimal and hence a small contributor to the larger picture of food waste and the aforesaid issues. But, food waste alone incurs huge monetary losses to industries and mankind, in general.
Food waste primarily revolves around any form of food, raw or cooked, used or unused – discarded or intended so.

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‘Food Wastes Recycling Law’ and even a ‘Law on promoting Green Purchase’, enabling industries and agriculturists to look towards effective uses of resources and also join the eco drive – which needs more initiatives like these. Various scientists and environmentalists believe, stringent laws, effective administration and self responsibility are the more vital points which can be looked at for grass root changes to come about, especially in country like India, where the maximum food waste comes from the agricultural waste sector.

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Which needs more initiatives like these. Various scientists and environmentalists believe, stringent laws, effective administration and self responsibility are the more vital points which can be looked at for grass root changes to come about, especially in country like India, where the maximum food waste comes from the agricultural waste sector.

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Micro-credit programs have been promoted in many countries, offering those in self-help groups, farmers associations, or marketing cooperatives a way to access cash to make investments in agriculture and post harvest improvements.
Market access has been a focus of several large international development projects funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Community Supported Agriculture and urban delivery vans are approaches to marketing that bring fresh foods closer to buyers in urban communities.
SAVE FOOD, a global initiative on food loss and waste reduction, is led by FAO and Messe
Düsseldorf, a leading trade fair organizer. Since 2011, it has worked with donors, development
agencies, financial institutions and the private sector (particularly the food packaging industry)
to develop and implement a program to reduce food loss and waste. The program rests on four
pillars: 1) awareness raising; 2) collaboration with like-minded initiatives; 3) policy, strategy,
and program development; and 4) support to food supply chain actors and organizations involved
in food loss and waste reduction.
A “food loss and waste protocol” would provide guidance
and requirements on what should be measured, how to
measure it, what unit(s) of measurement to use, what data
sources and quantification methods are appropriate, how
to ensure comparability among users and over time, and
how to report results, among other features. By conducting
periodic food- loss and waste audits conforming to the
protocol, countries and companies could quantify how
much and where food loss and waste are occurring within
their spheres of influence. Armed with this information,
countries and companies would be better able to identify
where opportunities for food loss and waste reduction
exist, who needs to be engaged to achieve those reductions,
what strategies may be appropriate, what targets to
set, and how much progress is being made over time.

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The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

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Proper segregation of the market waste. The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

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There is a need to harmonize,
across commodities and different
stages of the supply chain, the
measurement frameworks for food
loss and waste, to allow for structural,
reliable and comparable data…within
countries but also at global level, to
facilitate exchanges of information and
experiences. The use of standardized
criteria is key to measuring food loss
and waste and to assess where
to take action to reduce food loss
and waste. These criteria must be
scientifically supported and validated
by stakeholders in order to reconcile
the different situations regionally
and over time…transparency can
be encouraged by policy and be
organized in collaboration with
statistical offices (to harmonize the
reporting of data), the private sector
(along food chains, traders, etc.),
organizations (to be able to collect
detailed information about specific
commodities and supply chains) and
academics (to guarantee independent
and transparent processes).
Companies and private sector
organizations need to be involved in
this process.

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Food waste occurs during distribution and consumption and is generated during the processing,
handling, storage, sale, preparation, and serving of foods, according to the Food Waste
Reduction Alliance. Some of the most common causes of food waste around the world include:

* Unrealistic quality standards
* Mismatch of food preparation volumes to immediate demand

* Lack of access to adequate cooling and cold storage

* Poor quality packaging

* Delays in marketing/consumption of perishables

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You are correct Dr. Kar, I have also admitted about your idea and it will be elaborated as Plan out your meal and make your shopping list to determine what you actually need for the week. About 20% of what we buy in urban India ends up being thrown away. You could in the week after cut down on the surplus and soon in two or three weeks you will have a precise list of your family’s weekly consumption. You have no idea how amazed you will be at how much you buy and what you actually consume. Needless to say that the difference is but naturally wasted. 

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Yes Dr. Kar , It will be major problem about Lack of access to adequate cooling and cold storage for food wastage and Poor quality packaging .

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“Food loss and waste” refers to the edible parts of plants
and animals that are produced or harvested for human
consumption but that are not ultimately consumed by
people. In particular, “food loss” refers to food that spills,
spoils, incurs an abnormal reduction in quality such as
bruising or wilting, or otherwise gets lost before it reaches
the consumer. Food loss is the unintended result of an
agricultural process or technical limitation in storage,
infrastructure, packaging, or marketing. “Food waste”
refers to food that is of good quality and fit for human
consumption but that does not get consumed because it
is discarded—either before or after it spoils. Food waste
is the result of negligence or a conscious decision to throw
food away.

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Improved connectivity of
agricultural producers to each other
and to markets and consumers
can facilitate a reduction in food
loss by optimizing production and
distribution.

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One of the best and most effective tools for encouraging smallholder farmers to
reduce food waste is to teach them how to determine the costs and benefits of potentially useful
post harvest innovations. Further, sharing with farmers what post harvest technology is available
and is cost-effective allows them to better assess their individual situation and move beyond
believing that post harvest losses are out of their control.

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Food loss is mainly caused by the poor functioning of the
production and distribution of the supply chain and/or the
institutional and legal framework.
Food waste refers to the removal of food from the overall
supply that is fit for consumption, or which has been
spoiled or expired, mainly due to economic behavior,
poor stock management or neglect.

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Food loss and waste claims 20% of
freshwater consumption and uses
30% of the world’s agricultural land
area.

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“Food loss and waste” refers to the edible parts of plants
and animals that are produced or harvested for human
consumption but that are not ultimately consumed by
people. In particular, “food loss” refers to food that spills,
spoils, incurs an abnormal reduction in quality such as
bruising or wilting, or otherwise gets lost before it reaches
the consumer. Food loss is the unintended result of an
agricultural process or technical limitation in storage,
infrastructure, packaging, or marketing. “Food waste”
refers to food that is of good quality and fit for human
consumption but that does not get consumed because it
is discarded—either before or after it spoils. Food waste
is the result of negligence or a conscious decision to throw
food away.

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Single person households waste the most food on a per capita basis.
�� Contrary to accepted wisdom, older people waste as much avoidable food as younger people (1.2kg per
person per week); retired households appear to waste less but that is because they tend to be smaller.
�� Households that have never composted at home waste more food than households that either currently
compost or used to compost (3.3kg per week compared with 2.5 and 2.1kg per week respectively).

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If food loss and waste were a country,
it would rank as the third emitter
of CO2 in the world, even without
accounting for greenhouse gas
emissions from land use change.

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Food wastage is an issue that has a global scale. According to a report by the National Resources Defence Council (NRDC), 40 per cent of the food goes uneaten in the US, whereas in Asia, India and China cause a loss 1.3 billion tonnes of food wastage every year. In terms of overall food waste — agricultural produce, poultry and milk — India ranks seventh, with the Russian Federation at the top of the list.

India’s lower ranking is because most of the countries ranking above it utilise much of their land in raising poultry, while a major chunk of land in India is under agriculture and this explains the highest wastage of cereals, pulses, fruits and vegetables that occurs in India.

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We all waste food unnecessarily. On average, every one of us throws away 70kg of avoidable food a year –
that’s the weight of an average person.
�� And we don’t realise how much we throw away. Even householders who are adamant that their household
wastes no food at all are throwing away 88kg of avoidable food a year; that’s a typical 50l kitchen bin full.
�� Larger households waste more avoidable food than smaller households; certain types of households (e.g.
households with children) appear to waste more food but that is mainly because they contain more people.

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Success of this biogas plant depends a great deal on proper segregation of the market waste. The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

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Innovative approaches, technologies, and policies
Because the nature of the problems within food loss and waste are diverse and highly context specific,
solutions that are innovative, diverse, and cost-effective are needed. These solutions
may come from a variety of fields, including food science, engineering, and packaging sciences,
or they can be developed specifically for use in the post harvest sector. Wherever the solutions
come from, those most likely to succeed will be those that are cost-effective for smallholders and
small- to medium-scale enterprises. Solutions that are too complex to manage or too expensive
to maintain will have limited impact, as exemplified by the numerous well-intention but UN-utilized modern packinghouses, food processing, storage, and marketing facilities in the
developing world.
The majority of technologies and best practices for reducing food loss and waste throughout the
value chain fall into three categories: packaging, cold chain management, and promotion of 100
percent utilization of food.

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Food losses deprive the poor in the developing regions of the opportunity to access food and cause extensive depletion of resources such as land, water, and fossil fuels that are used in food production. Moreover, the food sector is estimated to contribute over 20 % of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

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Food loss and waste can occur at each stage of the food
value chain. Some examples of how they can
occur at each stage are:

1.During production or harvest in the form of grain left
behind by poor harvesting equipment, discarded fish,
and fruit not harvested or discarded because they fail to
meet quality standards or are uneconomical to harvest.

2.During handling and storage in the form of food
degraded by pests, fungus, and disease.

3.During processing and packaging in the form of spilled
milk, damaged fish, and fruit unsuitable for processing.
Processed foods may be lost or wasted because of poor
order forecasting and inefficient factory processes.

4.During distribution and marketing in the form of
edible food discarded because it is non-compliant with
aesthetic quality standards or is not sold before “best
before” and “use-by” dates.

5.During consumption in the form of food purchased by
consumers, restaurants, and caterers but not eaten.

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POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF REDUCING
LOSS AND WASTE

Big inefficiencies suggest big savings opportunities. But
how big is the potential? In 2012, the European Commission
set a target of reducing by 50 percent the rate
of food loss and waste in Europe by 2020. If this target
were extended globally to 2050, the analysis suggests that
achieving it would reduce the need to produce 1,314 trillion
kcal of food per year in 2050 relative to the business as-
usual scenario described in “The Great Balancing Act,”
the first installment of this World Resources Report working
paper series. In other words, cutting the global rate
of food loss and waste from 24 percent of calories down
to 12 percent would close roughly 22 percent of the 6,000
trillion kcal per year gap between food available today and
that needed in 2050. Thus the analysis suggests that
reducing food loss and waste could be one of the leading
global strategies or “menu items” for achieving a sustainable
food future.

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Food loss and waste have many negative economic and
environmental impacts. Economically, they represent a
wasted investment that can reduce farmers’ incomes and
increase consumers’ expenses. Environmentally, food loss
and waste inflict a host of impacts, including unnecessary
greenhouse gas emissions and inefficiently used water and
land, which in turn can lead to diminished natural ecosystems
and the services they provide.
“Food loss and waste” refers to the edible parts of plants
and animals that are produced or harvested for human
consumption but that are not ultimately consumed by
people. In particular, “food loss” refers to food that spills,
spoils, incurs an abnormal reduction in quality such as
bruising or wilting, or otherwise gets lost before it reaches
the consumer. Food loss is the unintended result of an
agricultural process or technical limitation in storage,
infrastructure, packaging, or marketing. “Food waste”
refers to food that is of good quality and fit for human
consumption but that does not get consumed because it
is discarded—either before or after it spoils. Food waste
is the result of negligence or a conscious decision to throw
food away.

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Another important aspect in smoother running of a biogas plant based on solid waste is how effectively one can avoid the choking of the plant. This choking may occur due to thick biomass that may be inaccessible to the microorganisms to digest it. The logical solution to such a problem is to convert the solid waste into slurry that would be far more accessible for the microbial action. A high power mixer to convert the solid waste into slurry can achieve this purpose. These two modifications certainly improve design of the traditional biogas plant.

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In the community market If the vegetable are not suitable for sales or not suitable for human consumption it will sent to the bio – gas plant and the residual was generated manure . The generated manure is high quality . By recycling ,we ensures that the bio – waste does not go to landfill sites thus preventing environmental damage and improving agricultural output by improving soil . It is ensured that the pre – consumer waste are fully recycled

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Why do we waste food?

The main reasons for throwing away food that could have been eaten if it had been managed better are:
* Left on the plate after a meal
* Passed its date
* Looked, smelt or tasted bad
* Went mouldy And left over from cooking
Reasons are different for different types of food. For example:

i) Bread:
out of date 29%, looked bad 21%, went mouldy 20%;

ii) Breakfast cereals:
73% left over after a meal;

iii) Eggs:
out of date 56%, left over 25%;

iv) Fresh fruit:
mouldy 37%, looked bad 25%;

v) Salads:
out of date 48%;

vi) Fresh meat and fish:
out of date 35%, left over 26%;
vii) Milk:
smelt or tasted bad 38%, out of date 37%;

viii) Rice:
left on plate 48%, left in saucepan 44%; and

ix) Condiments:
out of date 34%, left over after cooking 26%, left on plate 20%.

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For reduction of wastage of the following parameters we are making awareness with the Nutritionist following tips are given to change the food habit
1. To enjoy your favourite red meat recipes and cut down on the saturated fat content, you could go for extra-lean varieties or use less red meat and bulk up your recipes with low fat vegetable sources of protein such as lentils or beans. You could also try your usual beef mince recipes with vegetarian or turkey mince for a change!
2. Roast meat on a metal rack above a roasting tin, so fat can run off.

3. Try using tinned salmon, mackerel or sardines in a salad or on toast to contribute to your oily fish intake.
4. Remember that shellfish are low in fat and a source of selenium, zinc and copper! You could try a prawn curry, crab salad, or mussels with spicy tomato pasta.
5. Why not try using eggs as your protein source. They are really versatile and can be used to make a delicious omelette or frittata with lots of added vegetables. Mushrooms, tomatoes, onions, sweetcorn and peppers will all work well!
6. Look at labels on meat-based dishes to check fat, saturated fat and salt levels. 

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Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Dear Mr. Arora,
Thanks for your valuable points. Myself also adding some issues regarding this issues as follows :
Health Organization defines three facets of food security: food availability, food
access, and food use. India faces a threefold challenge to achieve food security; to
match the rapidly changing demand for food from a larger and more affluent
population to its supply; do so in ways that are environmentally and socially
sustainable; and ensure that the poorest people are no longer hungry. This challenge
requires changes in the way food is produced, stored, processed, distributed, and
accessed. Increase in production will have an important part to play, but they will be
considered as never before by the finite resources provided by Earth’s land, oceans and
atmosphere. Prevention of postharvest loss is increasingly cited as a means to
effectively contribute to available food supplies.

Spam
Photo of Debashis Arora

India remains an important global agricultural player; despite the fact that
agriculture’s share in the country’s economy is declining. It has the world’s largest
area under cultivation for wheat, rice, and cotton, and is the world’s largest producer of
milk, pulses, and spices (World Bank 2012). While India has seen impressive
economic growth in recent years, the country still struggles with widespread poverty
and hunger. India is home to 25 percent of the world’s hungry population. An
estimated 43 per cent of children under the age of five years are malnourished (WFP
2012).
Food security refers to the availability of food and one's access to it.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

• Plan out your meal and make your shopping list to determine what you actually need for the week. About 20% of what we buy in urban India ends up being thrown away. You could in the week after cut down on the surplus and soon in two or three weeks you will have a precise list of your family’s weekly consumption. You have no idea how amazed you will be at how much you buy and what you actually consume. Needless to say that the difference is but naturally wasted.

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Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

This study is concerned with the relation between food wastage reduction and the improvement of food security. By food security we mean that all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. This food security has a global and long term element to it (9 billion people to feed in 2050) and can be targeted at national, local and even individual level.

Spam
Photo of Prabir Banerjee

In recent years, food waste and food loss (together called food wastage in this study) have become high on the agenda of policy makers, researchers, business and civil society organisations. Many of those actors claim a positive relation between the reduction of food wastage and eliminating hunger and malnutrition.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Thanks Ms. Gosmani , for your valuable suggestion . It's estimated that, on average, 30 to 50 percent of the world's food is never
consumed. Food losses arising at the retail, food services (pre- consumer) and postconsumer
stages of the food chain have grown dramatically in recent years, for a
variety of reasons. Different strategies are required to tackle the two types of waste.
Food loss and waste also amount to a major squandering of resources, including water,
land, energy, labour and capital and needlessly produce greenhouse gas emissions,
contributing to global warming and climate change.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Food security refers to the availability of food and one's access to it. The World
Health Organization defines three facets of food security: food availability, food
access, and food use. India faces a threefold challenge to achieve food security; to
match the rapidly changing demand for food from a larger and more affluent
population to its supply; do so in ways that are environmentally and socially
sustainable; and ensure that the poorest people are no longer hungry. This challenge
requires changes in the way food is produced, stored, processed, distributed, and
accessed.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Thank you Mr.  Arora,

Your good suggestion are  always helps us . Food waste impacts our environment in several ways. It is evident that what we buy in the supermarket and what we make in our kitchen daily does have an effect on the atmosphere we are exposed to.

Spam
Photo of Pabitra Banerjee

Food security we mean that all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. This food security has a global and long term element to it (9 billion people to feed in 2050) and can be targeted at national, local and even individual level.
In recent years, food waste and food loss (together called food wastage in this study) have become high on the agenda of policy makers, researchers, business and civil society organisations. Many of those actors claim a positive relation between the reduction of food wastage and eliminating hunger and malnutrition.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Thank you Mr. Banerjee, for your kind conversation .  Actually Food Waste is a global issue . Lack of awareness about the subject bring the maximum wastage . The reuse and reduction of consumption pattern are the path finder of our research program .

Spam
Photo of Pabitra Banerjee

There are lot of hungry people in every city . About 15% of the population is food insecure. We need to required  mapped around  slums and the locations in every city where the excess food collected from different locations are donated. There is a startling imbalance, particularly due to large waste from corporate and group institutions. We may working in the city continuously to map hunger zones near these surplus food generators so that these food insecure locations can be made hunger free. 

Then I congratulate your research about community market food waste to divert it in bio gas and manure and also for awareness program for the buyers . 

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Food security refers to the availability of food and one's access to it. The World
Health Organization defines three facets of food security: food availability, food
access, and food use. India faces a threefold challenge to achieve food security; to
match the rapidly changing demand for food from a larger and more affluent
population to its supply; do so in ways that are environmentally and socially
sustainable; and ensure that the poorest people are no longer hungry. This challenge
requires changes in the way food is produced, stored, processed, distributed, and
accessed. Increase in production will have an important part to play, but they will be
considered as never before by the finite resources provided by Earth’s land, oceans and
atmosphere. Prevention of postharvest loss is increasingly cited as a means to
effectively contribute to available food supplies.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Food security refers to the availability of food and one's access to it. The World
Health Organization defines three facets of food security: food availability, food
access, and food use. India faces a threefold challenge to achieve food security; to
match the rapidly changing demand for food from a larger and more affluent
population to its supply; do so in ways that are environmentally and socially
sustainable; and ensure that the poorest people are no longer hungry. This challenge
requires changes in the way food is produced, stored, processed, distributed, and
accessed. Increase in production will have an important part to play, but they will be
considered as never before by the finite resources provided by Earth’s land, oceans and
atmosphere. Prevention of postharvest loss is increasingly cited as a means to
effectively contribute to available food supplies.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

As the gas is generated in the main tank, the dome is slowly lifted up. It reaches a maximum height of 8 feet holding 35 m3 of gas. This gas is a mixture of methane (70-75%), carbondioxide (10-15%) and water vapours (5-10%). It is taken through GI pipeline to the lamp posts. Drains for condensed water vapour are provided on line. This gas burns with a blue flame and can be used for cooking as well.
The gas generated in this plant is used for gas lights fitted around the plant. The potential use of this gas would be for a canteen. The manure generated is high quality and can be used in fields.
Success of this biogas plant depends a great deal on proper segregation of the kitchen waste. The materials that can pose problems to the efficient running of plant are coconut shells and coir, egg shells, onion peels, bones and plastic pieces. Steel utensils like dishes, spoons etc. are likely to appear in the waste bags from canteens. While bones, shells and utensils can spoil the mixer physically, onion peels, coir and plastic can have detrimental effects on microbial consortium in the predigester and main digestion tanks which could be disastrous for the plant.

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Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Another important aspect in smoother running of a biogas plant based on solid waste is how effectively one can avoid the choking of the plant. This choking may occur due to thick biomass that may be inaccessible to the microorganisms to digest it. The logical solution to such a problem is to convert the solid waste into slurry that would be far more accessible for the microbial action. A high power mixer to convert the solid waste into slurry can achieve this purpose. These two modifications certainly improve design of the traditional biogas plant.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

Another important aspect in smoother running of a biogas plant based on solid waste is how effectively one can avoid the choking of the plant. This choking may occur due to thick biomass that may be inaccessible to the microorganisms to digest it. The logical solution to such a problem is to convert the solid waste into slurry that would be far more accessible for the microbial action. A high power mixer to convert the solid waste into slurry can achieve this purpose. These two modifications certainly improve design of the traditional biogas plant.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

In recent years, food waste and food loss have risen up high on the agenda of policy makers, researchers, business and civil society organizations, internationally and in particular in Europe and in the Netherlands. Many of these actors see a linkage between food waste or food loss on the one hand, and food security on the other. For example, when launching the Zero Hunger Challenge in Rio in June 2012, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called for zero food loss and waste as part of the challenge of eliminating hunger. In October 2012, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva said achieving zero hunger would require, among other measures, moving to eliminate food loss and waste.
Such statements fit in with the increasing attention to world global food security. At the same time they remain rather implicit about the relationship between food waste/loss and food security. Using an example: if a school child in the Netherlands throws away the contents of his or her lunch box, this action does not directly result in another school child in South Sudan becoming more hungry. The link that does exist is often not made explicit.
In this study we investigate to what extent reducing food waste and food loss is an effective action to improve food security. To do so, we aim to generate a better understanding of the present state of knowledge, and perspectives of several stakeholders on the relationship between reducing food wastage and food security.
In the first part of this report, we give an overview of major international, European and Dutch actors active in the field of loss and/or waste. These actors are grouped according to their activities and associated motives to take action, particularly with respect to the effect on food security they hope to achieve.

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Why is food wastage a problem?
25% of fresh water used to produce food is ultimately wasted, even as millions of people still don’t have access to drinking water. When calculate the figures in cubic kilometers, this is a bit more than an average river.
Even though the world produces enough food to feed twice the world’s present population, food wastage is ironically behind the billions of people who are malnourished. The number of hungry people in India has increased by 65 million more than the population of France. According to a survey by Bhook (an organization working towards reducing hunger) in 2013, 20 crore Indians sleep hungry on any given night. About 7 million children died in 2012 because of hunger/malnutrition.
Acres of land are deforested to grow food. Approximately 45% of India’s land is degraded primarily due to deforestation, unsustainable agricultural practices, and excessive groundwater extraction to meet the food demand.
300 million barrels of oil are used to produce food that is ultimately wasted.
This study is concerned with the relation between food wastage reduction and the improvement of food security. By food security we mean that all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. This food security has a global and long term element to it (9 billion people to feed in 2050) and can be targeted at national, local and even individual level.
In recent years, food waste and food loss (together called food wastage in this study) have become high on the agenda of policy makers, researchers, business and civil society organisations. Many of those actors claim a positive relation between the reduction of food wastage and eliminating hunger and malnutrition.

Spam
Photo of Dr. Sukumar Kar

INDIANS waste as much food as the whole of United Kingdom consumes – a statistic that may not so much indicative of our love of surfeit, as it is of our population. Still, food wastage is an alarming issue in India. Our street and garbage bins, landfills have sufficient proof to prove it.
Weddings, canteens, hotels, social and family functions, households spew out so much food. According to the United Nations Development Programme, up to 40% of the food produced in India is wasted. About 21 million tonnes of wheat are wasted in India and 50% of all food across the world meets the same fate and never reaches the needy. In fact, according to the agriculture ministry, Rs. 50,000 crore worth of food produced is wasted every year in the country.