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RISE Products

We turn organic by-products into healthy and sustainable food ingredients; one industry at a time, creating value for all stakeholders.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
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OPENIDEO Collaborations!

1. We have exciting news! A fellow OpenIDEATOR, Aitan Mizrahi, has generously agreed to help us with some funds to test our new and improved dehydration process. Over the last two months, we've been collaborating to design an ultra efficient process to convert any food waste into a dry and useable form. After creating an optimized process, we are currently ready to go into testing it, thanks to Aitan and Paul Discoe. All our findings and data will be shared with them as we test some of our assumptions over the next few months. Collaborative prototyping, yay!

2. Another OpenIDEATOR, Jen, really helped us out when she put us in touch with a food management expert at a private company in New York. Not only was he very helpful in giving us advice, he also put in touch with people who are currently researching and funding solutions to dry food. Moreover, he invited us to visit his facility to learn more about food preservation techniques, and to talk more about how we can collaborate in the future. Thanks Jen!

3. Finally, we put representatives of Toast Ale, a shortlisted idea, in touch with one of our partner brewers at Strongrope brewery. This is to help them launch their first brew in America, and we're looking forward to tasting it soon. Hopefully, their collaboration will prove fruitful and  maybe we can work together on a joint idea? Who knows what can happen when OpenIDEATORs' worlds collide!

Please take our brief survey once you've read our idea.

We have a problem!

Problem

What can we do?

We want to feed you!

We're a group of people who incentivize companies to recycle by providing tangible, market-driven economic benefits. Traditionally, waste from industrial processes has gone to landfills, incinerators, or treatment plants, and often has a negative impact on the environment and companies' bottom lines. Annually, US industries spend more than $55 billion in waste disposal costs. Currently, many businesses are trying to find ways to reduce their environmental footprint and create value from their industrial byproducts. Industrial symbiosis can solve both of these issues. In an industrial symbiosis system, waste from one industrial process serves as the raw materials for another, helping to preserve the environment and lower manufacturing costs at the same time.

Target Market: 

Solution

We are initially targeting the beer industry and food industry in NYC. The main byproduct of the brewing process is called brewers’ spent grain, which is currently disposed at the landfill or in limited cases used as livestock feed. There are more than 40 breweries in NYC, and each of them spends from $1,200 to $4,000 per month in disposal cost. However, there are interesting solutions to the spent grain issue, given that many industries could benefit from its use (such as the food, construction, animal feeding and cosmetics industries). We are particularly focusing our efforts in the food industry  (pasta makers, and baked goods), and pet food industry.

Our process:

Approach

Currently, we are developing new applications for the by-product by creating and testing experimental proof of concept products. We work with breweries to collect the spent grain as soon as it goes through the first stage of the brewing process. We then dehydrate it and mill it into fine flour. This flour is then used to create different recipes, which we then test with a target market through an independent distributor. In order to discover the most efficient and effective use of the ingredient, we are working with chefs, bakers and food engineers. Simultaneously, we are developing a more efficient method to process the spent grain into a usable substance, such as extracting protein to use as a food additive.

Partners:

Partners

We are currently working with Six Points and Green Point Breweries, food incubators, bakeries, farmers, and chefs around the New York City area. We are also learning from food waste experts and industrial engineers to help us create a sustainable logistical network.

Impact Model:

Impact Model

Our overarching goal is to become the go-to marketplace for many industries selling and buying various materials. We are currently developing a machine-learning algorithm based on the industries and by-products we identified in our research stage. We are also exploring opportunities to provide coordination, logistics, and transportation of materials between buyers and sellers, and experimenting with food industries to find new applications for organic by-products. Within the waste market, there are a number of organizations attempting to accomplish the same mission as RISE, albeit through non-scalable or more manual methods.

Our final form

How does it work?

In order to better explain the process, we've created three different personas and their user journeys. Thank you OpenIDEO for your awesome toolkit, it made our workshop so much easier! We decided to focus on these three particular personas since they represent the primary types of partners we will be working with. Please check them out, we'll be prototyping parts of them during our next workshop this Thursday, October 6th. There's more info about the event in the comments section.

                                                                The Brewer

Persona 1
Steps 1 & 2
Steps 3 & 4
Steps 5 & 6

In order to prototype this part of our idea, we held a workshop at NYU today. We went over the entire idea and then broke it down into the various personas and use journeys. We then decided to tackle one user at a time. We first came up with the most important questions for each step, and they're presented below.

Awareness - How can we convince brewers to adopt our process?Education - What's the best way to teach them the new process?Notification - How might we best design an app integrate our process into the brewers' practice?Pickup - What is the most efficient way to store and transport the spent grain?Feedback - What kind of data should we present to the bakers, and how?Engagement - How might we make it easier for other people to get on board?

After a short discussion, we voted on the most important question and number 4 - regarding pickup won. We decided that an efficient way to store and transport the spent grain is vital to avoid spoilage and ensure that the grain remains fit for human consumption. 

Questions                                   

                                                            The Middleman

Persona 2
Steps 1 & 2
Steps 3 & 4
Steps 5 & 6

We then carried out the same steps for the middleman and decided on the following questions for each step:

Awareness - How can we identify the partners who most fit with our vision?Education - How can we efficiently share the process with them?Notification - How can we alert them in time to help them prepare their facilities for processing?Delivery - How can we make delivery seamless and easy?Processing - How can we keep track of quality data across the steps?Shipping - How can we make shipment and payment easy for our partners?

We then voted on question 2 regarding education being the most important. Not only is it important to decide on the content of the messaging, we also have to design the format.

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                                                                The Baker

Persona 3
Steps 1 & 2
Steps 3 & 4
Steps 5 & 6

Finally we performed the same process for the last user - the Baker. The questions were as follows:

Awareness - How can we help bakers discover new ingredients?

Education - What information will be most engaging and useful to bakers?

Experimenting - How can ensure that experiments are well-planned and successful?

Purchasing -How might we make ordering easy and seamless?

Feedback - How might we have an on-going relationship with bakers through data sharing?

Engagement - How might we make it easier for other users to get on board?

Out of these, we voted on the first question being the most important since we had to discover the ways in which bakers learn about new ingredients and integrate them into their recipes.

Questions

Business Plan and Future

Business Plan
Future Projections

Platform Prototype

Interface to buy and sell organic byproducts
If you're a home baker and you'd like to help us with this, please take our survey.

UPDATE 1 Collaboration with an OpenIDEATOR - August 25th

We had a great meeting with a fellow OpenIDEATOR who we met when he commented on our idea! Aitan works at a Community Organization in Oakland CA where he is the resident researcher and developer. We both shared our backgrounds and current projects, and realized that we faced the same issue - it was difficult to cheaply and effectively dry spent grains and other wet organic matter.

Aitan

However, we had complementary resources. Since we're at an engineering school, we can work with students to develop a design for a drying solution. However, we lack the funds to build and test one. This is where Aitan could help us, since he has the ability to build a processor, but has no ready design. Thus, we decided to partner on this project and will work together over the next few months. We will be meeting with a few engineers soon and hopefully can simulate a mechanism in the next few months. So excited!

UPDATE 2 Started working with a baker - September 2nd

Chai Latte Cake

We met with a baker who was very interested in working with spent grain four. He had previously tried baking with wet spent grain but since he did not have much success, he abandoned the project. However, we learnt about him through a brewer and decided to pay him a visit. We had a great meeting where we shared some of our products and recipes with him.

Peter

I think we impressed him because he gave us a tour of his kitchen and then asked us to provide him with some flour. We made a pound of flour for him to test (making bread and cakes), and we're eagerly awaiting the results of his experiment. He also promised to put is in touch with some friends of his who are interested in testing new ingredients, so fingers crossed!

UPDATE 3 Partnering with breweries to design a RISE App - September 14th

We've been working with a small brewery in Brooklyn who we discovered through an online brewing community. Strong Rope Brewery creates handcrafted local and organic ales featuring seasonal offerings that will use the freshest vegetables, fruits, herbs, and spices showcasing the New York State farmers and maltsters they work with to create great tasting beer. Owner Jason Sahler studied sustainable design and development at New York University and is passionate about incorporating sustainable practices into all aspects of the brewery. This core feature of the brewery is its promotion of environmental sustainability by selling organic and local products, reducing waste in the production and retail of the brewery. Whenever possible Strong Rope Brewery purchases energy-efficient equipment, incorporates green construction, and implements operational practices, minimizing environmental impact, with the eventual goal of creating a LEED certified brewery. Strong Rope Brewery works with NYSERDA to improve energy efficiency to the manufacturing process of brewing and fermenting beer. 

Danielle

We met them at their brewery and introduced ourselves after a tour. They were very interested in working with us since they want to become a zero-waste facility. We then proceeded to work out a plan with them. We first analyzed their past brew logs to find patterns of how much they brew, how often they brew, and what kind of grains they use.

RISE app

We also created a very simple app for them to notify us of when they're about to brew so that we will know when to pick it up. They can also then update it to give us more details about the brew, such as the style, the ingredients, and a short description of the beer. This will allow us to keep track of their production and use that information to streamline our operations. They will start using this app from next month onwards.

We also wrote to the Kings County Brewery Collective, a trio of experienced brewers who have joined forces to bring their shared vision of quality, variety and community to craft beer drinkers throughout New York City and beyond. After several years of honing their brewing skills in tiny apartments, at the American Brewers Guild in Vermont, and professionally at breweries across the city, they all independently came to the same conclusion: to open a new brewery in NYC. Their 15 BBL production brewery + taproom is located in a 5,000 square foot warehouse in Bushwick. We're meeting with them next month to discuss how to collaborate, but they're already fascinated by our idea!

UPDATE 4 Community Kitchen - September 19th

Hana

As we've been thinking about how to manufacture our products in an efficient manner, we came across a few community kitchens in an around Brooklyn. We visited one, the Hana kitchen in Brooklyn, and met with Pedro the day manager. Pedro gave us a tour of the facility and demonstrated the various equipment that we could have access to. He also introduced us to a few manufacturers working in the space and pointed out potential opportunities to collaborate with them. We are currently exploring the possibility of renting the kitchen for $250 to have a test run before we purchase a membership. We believe that being a part of this kitchen is helpful to us not only because they would guide us through the legal and regulatory process, but also because we could become part of the community of food manufacturers who we could learn from and work with.

UPDATE 5 Presented RISE at the UN - September 24th

Some exciting personal news. A few months ago, I applied to the Falling Walls Lab, an interdisciplinary forum for aspiring scientists and professionals from around the world. It is part of the annual, internationally renowned, conference for breakthroughs in science and society, the Falling Walls Conference. With the slogan “Share Your Idea!” the Falling Walls Lab offers hundreds emerging talents, entrepreneurs and innovators a stage to pitch their research work, initiatives or business models to their peers and a distinguished jury from academia and business.

Me :-)

Out of more than 300 submissions, ten were selected to present their ideas at the Nations on the 30th of August. I was very pleased to learn that I had been selected to present the idea behind RISE to such a prestigious event. After receiving professional coaching, I made a 3 minute speech to an audience of 300 select guests invited from the field of science and technology. I received a tremendous amount of feedback on RISE, which we will incorporate into our idea going forward. We also made great connections with people from diverse fields, who were very interested in the concept of Industrial Symbiosis underlying our venture. I am meeting soon with some of our new contacts and hopefully some interesting collaborations could come out of it!

UPDATE 6 Pet food Conference in Kansas - October 3rd

Market

We visited Kansas State University to attend their annual Pet Food conference held on September 13-16. We learnt that the pet food market has been growing every year for the last 15 years.  This industry is not a luxury market anymore, but it is becoming a commodity market. The premium products are on the rise. Treats are the second largest segment, and customers are willing to spend 16% of their food expenditure on them.  Pet food Industry is always looking for novelty ingredients. Hence, using Spent Grains might be a significant opportunity for us to explore. People working on pet food are used to working with by-products. Maybe this is something we should look into because it might have lower entry barrier. 

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We learnt that only 50% of meat ends on our plates; the rest is used in pet food. Pet food brings higher margins to the meat market. The industry is always looking for innovative ingredients to try for their animal product. Per our conversations with the people in this industry, the spent grain could be useful for the pet treats. 16% of the US Petfood market spending is in treats. Here are the amounts of money that people spent on treats. The most common dog treats are in the $5-9 bracket, followed by the $10-19 bracket.

The Katz Lab

The last day we went to visit a lab from a professor (Benjamin Katz) that we met on the first day of the conference. This professor also deals with waste stream, and he showed us his lab to helped us figure out what is they best way we can dehydrate our material. The following pictures are of equipment set ups that he recommended us to use to increase the quality of organics byproducts. The next figure is a freeze dryer. This part is critical to maintaining the aromatics of the grains.

Dry Ice Freeze Dryer

Here is the dehydrator that connects to the freeze dryer. Also, when you put a freeze dryer adjustment, you can boost the capacity of the dehydrator.

Vacuum pump dehydrator

The following picture shows an electric pump that is used for their system. He recommends this type of pump for our system because it will be more inexpensive and effective for production. He also told us that many university labs are upgrading now, so maybe the Physics labs at NYU can give us one for free.

Electric pump to generate vacuum

We also talked about how to control the quality of the byproducts. He advised us to mix the different spent grains, and also look on mixing them with enzymes. Enzymes can help us get rid of the texture problem and homogenize the flavor. Also, he told us, that when we have different batches, to send it to him, and that he would help us with the quality control, and also to see if there are peptides that are affecting our material. He will charge us very little (~ $100) because we are a startup. 

Update 7 New Partnerships with Brewers - Oct 8th

Check out some pictures of our latest collaborator, 3s brewing, 15 barrel brewery in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

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Mash Tun
Seal
Yummy spent grain

Aerial view

Update 8 Prototyping workshop - October 9th

A few pictures from our prototyping workshop on Thursday. We've updated our idea to reflect some of the changes.

Testing the toughness of carbon fiber. Can it bear 200 lbs?
Sketching out a design for storage and transportation solutions
Pretend that's a shovel.
Bonus pic! Bertha with some of our samples of beer flour.

Please note, that the above flour is what we send to bakers and chefs for them to try out.

UPDATE 9 Working with machines - OCTOBER 11TH

We have some awesome news regarding the technical aspects of our idea! We're currently testing our drying process and we've been making some headway by using latent urban resources. Today, we were offered the use of equipment from a person we met at a waste recycling talk last week and then saw our OpenIDEO post! At the same time, an engineer from Florida contacted us with an offer to test our raw materials on his equipment! We've also been contacted by a couple of Ideators from developing countries who are interested in learning and testing our process. We're really touched by how people read our ideas and reach out to us with advice and help. Also, a few students from NYU have written to us to meet and learn more about RISE. We're only happy to have them on board! Being on OpenIDEO has helped us by allowing our idea to reach out to people around the world!

UPDATE 10 PRESENTED RISE AT Sustainatopia - OCTOBER 13TH

Today, I participated in a panel at a sustainability conference in Boston, where I was selected to talk about RISE. The panel was "Exploring Innovations within waste and recycling" at the annual SUSTAINATOPIA meeting. Founded in 2009, SUSTAINATOPIA is one of the leading events in the world for social, financial and environmental sustainability & impact. Attendees have participated from more than 60 countries. Consisting of both a mega-conference and a broad-ranging Festival, SUSTAINATOPIA brings together the global ecosystem of social, financial and environmental sustainability & impact like no other singular event. Over 1,500 expert speakers have participated during the last 5 years. I got some great feedback on RISE and made connections with some amazing people there.

Participating in the panel
Meeting sustainability expert Terry Mollner from Ben & Jerry

Update 11 Visit to the Vineyard - October 13th

Please check out some of our pictures from our visit to Rooftop Reds, the world’s first commercially viable urban rooftop vineyard in New York City. We met with Devin and Chris, the innovative winemakers from the finger lakes region. They are currently growing grapes on a rooftop at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and are expecting their first harvest in the fall of 2017. They expect to grow enough to make one barrel of wine. We think it's a great initiative, and we look forward to working with them to develop new applications for their byproducts.

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Please take our brief survey once you've read our idea.


Please check out the preliminary results from our survey below:

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What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

We are currently working on recipes for brownies, cakes, and bread using spent grain flour. We will work with a local cafe to sell these products locally to assess the demand and acceptance rate. We will then tweak our recipes based on the feedback. We will partner with the brewery to test paired products tailored to their beers and test how people react to simultaneously eating and drinking the same grain. We are also constantly trying to make our manufacturing and logistics more efficient.

What skills, input or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

We would like to work with members of this community to discover new and more efficient applications for spent grain. If someone in NYC wants to join us in our experiments, we can set aside some flour so that you can play around with it. Any avid bakers out there? How about food engineers? We also require some assistance in testing (free brownies!) and selling our prototypes. Your expertise will be useful to help us make our processing and transport more efficient. We would love any feedback!

Tell us about your work experience:

Our team comprises of seven NYU students and alumni. Our collective experience includes mechanical engineering, computer engineering, technology management, industrial engineering and design, data analysis, branding and marketing, software developing, and startup experience. We are also working in close relationship with chefs, brewers, bakers, and food engineers to understand and incorporate their learning into our products.

This idea emerged from

  • A group brainstorm
  • A student collaboration

How far along is your idea?

  • It was in the works before this challenge – it’s existed for 2-6 months

How would you describe this idea to your grandmother?

Remember you taught me that when you harvest bananas, you don't throw away the rest of the tree? You use the leaves as natural packaging, and you can eat the stem and flowers. We're trying to do the same for beer, wine, and coffee. We take the by products and turn them into something useful.

[Only for launched ideas] How does your idea differ from what you're already doing?

It's weird because we're bunch of NYU students and alumni who are researching and working on very different things. We come together to work on this because a) We really believe in the idea, and b) THIS is our social life. We hang out together, eat together and drink together and we work on RISE every day. So RISE is very different from what we normally do in our daily lives. We've really incorporated RISE into our personal lives as well. We've been eating spent grain for the last few months!

How is your idea unique to the space?

Our idea is unique because we want to recycle food. We turn by products into food. Currently, the only option is to throw it away, and at best, to compost it. However, the EPA has a food recovery hierarchy. Composting is nearly at the bottom. Feeding humans however, is a top priority, along with source reduction. Moreover, beer spent grain isn't even considered a food waste yet. REFED's ~54 M T of annual food waste doesn't take the 4.8 M T of spent grain into consideration. We'll fill that gap!

Who needs to play a role in your idea in order to make it successful?

We need to build relationships with research labs in food science and biochemistry to help us create enzymatic protein extraction methods. We will work with private haulers and food handlers to safely collect, store and transport the grain. We are already working with coop kitchens and social food ventures to test samples of our flour to bake products, and OpenIDEATORS like Aitan Mizrahi, and receiving advice from the department of sanitation and health regarding regulations and safe processes.

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

1. BSG Recovery Rate = Volume of flour per batch/Volume of grain collected. It measures how effective/efficient our process is. 2. Number of breweries we're able to convert into 0 waste businesses. 3. Cost saving rate = Cost of recipe with BSG/Cost of traditional recipe. It calculates how much money we save bakeries. 4. Nutrition = Amount of people who we help reach atleast 50% of daily protein + fiber requirement 5. Environmental Impact = Amount of CO2 saved from a) Biodegradation b) Transport

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

How immediate? We have a meeting on October 22nd with a community kitchen that hires low income immigrant women and gives the hands-on training in baking and cooking. We want to work with them to introduce them to our raw materials, and teach them how to use it. If it works out well, we can start producing the raw materials and they can develop a marketable product that we're sure will be in high demand - not only because of its nutrition and health benefits, but also because it'll be tasty!

92 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Carolina Mndz
Team

This is extremely interesting. Before deciding to implement this idea int the beer industry, did you explore other industries? what are some factors that influence your decision on beer industry in NYC?
Good luck!

Photo of Jing Su (NYU)
Team

It is really interesting. Thank you for your sharing! This is a very ingenious solution! I like how you two collborated to make an even stronger solution to food waste.

Photo of jeo john
Team

Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your article and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your article . Any way I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I hope you post again soon.http://petrotek.ae/lubricants/1/industrial-lubricants

Photo of Karolina Skupień
Team

Congratulations to all contributors. Great fan of your idea! like the mind maps. It's great that you actually take it into action and make it happen! Looking forward to see the results of your work.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thank you :) We will keep you posted !!
Here is more info : http://www.foodandcity.org/2017finalists/

Photo of Neena Thomas
Team

Really impressed the main points specify in this post. Food waste recycling idea is best way we can reduce pollution. Food waste is large amount of waste around us and there are several new methods to recycling wastes. Share your ideas in top rated essay writing pages. http://essaywriting-servicereviews.com/

Photo of Amy Halloran
Team

I love this idea! I write about regional grain production and want to know more about this flour. Looking forward to hearing more.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Amy! Thanks for your comment! If you want to send me an email at bertha@risemarketplace.com

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Bertha Jimenez  Amazing live prototype last Wednesday at Greenpoint Brewery, Brooklyn, NY!
The food was delicious and it was great to see how you could use the flower. 
Check this write up on the idea and the prototype: http://engineering.nyu.edu/news/2016/12/07/rise-team-upcycles-food-waste-flour

Photo of Ozuluonye Shedrack
Team

Congratulating all team members and Openideo community members in advance. God job.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Update - October 24- Thank you OpenIDEO OpenIDEO ! Our idea has been seen in Europe! We will start a contract in November with an environmental company in Barcelona! We were also contacted from Amsterdam to share our sustainable practice about the brewery industry! 

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Update - October 17th. We met a Marta who is a Chef by trade and a social media junkie at heart. She's helping us develop a few recipes using beer spent grain, and we'll share the updates with you soon! So far, she's going to teach us to make ravioli, gnocchi, muffins, banana bread, cookies, quiche, and shortbread. 

Photo of Jessie Dong
Team

Great and piratical idea. Very professional analysis. Good to see that it is under prototyping process already.   

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thank you, Jessie, for your nice comment :) 

If you haven't done so, could you please fill our brief survey. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSee7fSzYTym1OvJB59mVcceINqvSldU1RjbPClHwuVH0gOGPQ/viewform?c=0&w=1 

Photo of Ozuluonye Shedrack
Team

" We have a meeting on October 22nd with a community kitchen that hires low income immigrant women and gives the hands-on training in baking and cooking. We want to work with them to introduce them to our raw materials, and teach them how to use it"
I consider the above a welcome idea as it boost the income of the (low income) immigrants and conversely would provide food in their tables. 

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Yeah, and also teach them about a free source of ingredients for their personal use.

Photo of mitch Lee
Team

Hi team,

Are there parallels food recycling initiatives in cities that could be used? I imagine they'd have a standardised process that would  provide a potential best practice process for the logistical part of this idea. 

Could someone in the group put this model into an business model canvas so that we can see how the business works within a frame? I'm just trying to understand the where the money in the business is? e.g., what is the disposal cost of the boutique brewery? And what is the value of the by-product to the brewer in its final form? Simply, does the brewery pay a cost to offload their by-product? Or does it rely on them giving it to you for free? Lastly, just to be clear, is this offering essentially a business that makes products from spent grain? 

Progress is looking great by the way!

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

Hi, Mitch. I think some of these were previously answered by Ashwin Gopi on 09:25, Aug 17, 2016. But yes, a business model canvas is always useful.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hey Mitch, though we don't explicitly have a business model canvas, our post addresses all the parts of it. The money comes from two streams. One, we offer microbreweries a cheaper disposal alternative. They currently spend up to $4000/month. We can cut costs and charge them half since we don't have to drive that far, and we don't have to pay disposal fees at the dump. The other stream is to sell the processed flour to bakers and food manufacturers for a profit. This is only an example of one industry; we will do the same for other sources of organic byproducts, such as coffee grounds, juice pulp, and wine pomace.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thanks Mitul Sarkar  ! We've update our idea a little more!

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

In situations where you have a large source of spent grain but are unhappy about any enzymes in it, would it make sense to denature the enzymes (rendering them biologically inactive) so that the spent grain can enter your processing stream? 
The updates about emerging collaborations are nice to read...I'm sure they will be favorably received by the jury.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Great question Mitul Sarkar ! The point about the enzymes is that if it is used by the brewery, it means that very little nutrients are available in the spent grain. The grains will be truly spent. Instead, if a microbrewery chooses to eschew enzymes, that means it'll free up a lot of nutrients to be extracted on our end. It's a question of efficiency, that's all. Rendering the grain biologically inactive is a step that we nonetheless perform.

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Welcome to the Refinement phase Bertha! We've added new Refinement questions to your original submission that we'd love for you to answer. Please check out the Refinement Phase Toolkit for instructions on how to answer the new questions and other recommendations we encourage all idea teams to consider in the upcoming weeks.

Refinement Phase Toolkit: http://ideo.pn/2du9sf7

Lastly, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 09/28" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Bertha, we updated the link to the Refinement Toolkit. Please use this new link instead: https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/bda1f109-0466-4f8e-9699-1359e406df56.pdf

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thanks, it was super useful! We used it on our workshops and have updated our post accordingly.

Photo of Dhananjay Abhang
Team

Hello Bertha, great model and very well done. However, i would like know about the drying technology being used. Because i think creating low cost technology to retain the nutrient values will be challenge. Also would like to explore how this can be implemented in emerging markets like India.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Dhananjay, there are many ways to dry the grain while preserving the nutrition, such as infrared and freeze drying. The largest challenge right now is to find a source of spent grain that has no additives or enzymes in them.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

In regards to your emerging markets point, it is something we are contemplating. Our team has people of different nationalities (including Ecuador, India,  & Turkey). We think our idea could be useful for different settings, We will probably start with our home countries :) 

Photo of Dhananjay Abhang
Team

Happy to know that you have people from India in your team. Come to India soon :)

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Great experience maps Bertha!

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thanks!! I learned from the best :)

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Please take our brief survey once you've read our idea: https://goo.gl/forms/ttYfIrHETXMRp5ZH3

Photo of Amber Matthews
Team

How healthy are the cakes you're making?

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Amber,
They are super healthy because the spent grain is just barley that has been boiled and crushed. The nutritional value of barley surpasses the value of traditional bread flour. The flour made up from spent grain has more fiber and protein, and fewer calories and cholesterol content.  To give you some numbers, the protein content of barley is 25% (even more than chicken).  So, eat goods made up of spent grain :)

Photo of Amber Matthews
Team

Where can I find some?

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

We are still pre-production, but lets keep in touch so you can be one of our first clients :)

Photo of Amber Matthews
Team

Wait, are you saying that I can just go to a brewery, pick up some grain, take it home, and bake with it? Are you saying that I went through four years of college without learning that there's free food out there?

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Yes, you can... And there are plenty of yummy recipes on the internet...  Personally, I love to bake cookies with the flour, and put some dulce de leche on them :)

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Dear Ideators,
We are organizing a workshop @Greenhouse NYU to help us refine our idea... Here is the link: 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/is-beer-food-tickets-28269608159 

Please register or share our workshop!

best,

Bertha

Photo of Julia Koskella
Team

Hi Bertha, loved reading your update about Strong Rope Brewer!  We've actually just started working in New York to bring Toast there... and our US team member would love an introduction, would that be possible at all? Her email is Devin@toastale.com. Their ethic with wanting to reduce waste seems like a great fit for us too! Thank you so much - Julia

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Julia,

Sure, I will connect her with strong rope... When is she coming to NY?  I know other breweries that work under the same reduce waste ethic...

best,
Bertha

Photo of julie
Team

Thank you so much! She is based in New York full-time so all intros appreciated :) Look forward to seeing how we can connect all these dots for more sustainable brewing! -J

Photo of Julia Koskella
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Thanks so much Bertha! (PS: Julie is my Toast team member co-leading this challenge with me from the UK - Julie and Julia, confusing!)

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Very interesting to read about the dire need in the industry RE: the drying of grain. 

I believe my company Cornucopia Group has managed to develop exactly what you need. 

https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/our-sustainable-dehydration-turns-post-harvest-food-waste-into-profits-for-producers-and-nutrition-for-people

We use an all natural GMO free protein coating to efficiently air-dry foods without using nearly as much energy as conventional means. I have not tested the drying of grains, but you've made me want to! 

We also have a mill that "teases" materials apart using resonant frequency and intense but tiny and rapid air pressure changes. The result when milling grains this was we discovered was that the endosperm and shell are not damaged. They are simply separated, and as a result the cells do not die, and the milled grain is not attacked by pests or bacteria. In a nutshell, the dinner bell never rings. Our mill can produce flour that lasts fresh to FDA standards on the shelf, even unsealed for over 15 years. We have some info available at cornucopiagroup.org as well. 

I think our missions are aligned, and it would be interesting to see where we might collaborate in the future.

Chad K.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Chad,

Great to hear about your company. I check your video, and it is really amazing what you are doing. I would sure like to try some of your coatings :) Where are you located? Maybe we can have a chat, and see how we can collaborate... Do you have an email I can write? 

thanks for reaching out!

best,
Bertha

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Hey Chad, we would absolutely love to test your PS coating on our raw materials. We've been exploring enzymatic processes and the use of antioxidants, but we're totally looking forward to go in your direction. How could we collaborate? Perhaps we should set up a google hangout.

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Hello Ashwin, feel free to email me at chad@cornucopiagroup.org

What raw material are you dealing with primarily? And wherea re you located? We are always interested to identify new sources of waste to convert into abundance!

Cheers,

Chad

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Very interested in collaborating. I saw your presentation at falling walls in NY. Great work, I certainly can imagine that we may be able to collaborate!

Cheers,

Chad
chad@cornucopiagroup.org

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Very interested in collaborating. I saw your presentation at falling walls in NY. Great work, I certainly can imagine that we may be able to collaborate!

Cheers,

Chad
chad@cornucopiagroup.org

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thanks, Chad! 

We are also super excited on working with you!
best,
b

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Congratulations on being one of the forty ideas in the refinement stage. I am excited to see how this idea develops.

Can I just double check something? The biggest barrier you have at the moment is dehydration. Is that correct?

I am wondering if it is worth having an infographic  that shows your current focus and 'vision'. I think it might add some clarity. 

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Kate,

Thank you very much for the congrats :) We are super excited about this!

Yes, dehydration is one of the biggest challenges. We are working on that now.
I think the infographic suggestion is a great one... Visuals are always useful for clarification, you are completely right :)  My team will work on one and put it on the update.
best,Bertha

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Bertha, here are two articles that might be interesting for your project:

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/22/kenyan-farmers-fight-food-loss-by-drying-selling-mangoes/

http://www.opb.org/news/article/3-ways-northwest-companies-are-turning-food-waste-/

Cheers,

al

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi AL,

Thanks for the articles and the feedback... Great read! Yeah, we have encountered a similar issue. Dehydration is a key step to making the organic by-product last longer. We are figuring out the best way to do it. We have to put back our engineers' hat :) Initially, with our platform, we didn't want to have any involvement with the manufacturing part. However, we can't oversee the intermediate step of dehydration, because it is super important. Also, we found during the conference we just attended that there is an extra step we need to consider: the kill step. The main problem with organics is the microorganism. So, it was recommended to cook any material for 15 mins at 90 C. It doesn't take that long, but it preserves ingredient longer.  

best,
b

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Dear Bertha Jimenez , great initiative, and super timely given that this week the United Nations is promoting the Global Goals (SDGs).  Can you please keep us in mind as and when you think about dehydration: ZacSnax makes dehydrated rescued fruit into healthy snacks for all kids to enjoy, and we are seeking to scale it more through crowdmapping and gamification via our idea Be an Urban and Suburban Food Donor and Rescuer... Pokemon Go style! 

We currently use domestic dehydrators, but one problem is the high energy usage (and so carbon footprint and cost). So any ideas of how best to address this issue would be greatly appreciated. Chad Knutsen and Aitan Mizrahi , does your technology help in this regard? 

Anne-Laure Fayard , I liked the article on the Kenyan mango farmers dehydrating with solar dryers. Must look into that, but fear that the humidity of our tropics may reduce its efficacy... 

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Brian Tang absolutely we can. Our technology uses much less energy than traditional dehydration methods such as dryers or freezers, and it does not degrade the nutrition at all. 100% of the nutritional value is preserved. 

We only use enough energy to operate a few large fans for airflow.

contact me any time at chaf@cornucopiagroup.org

i am actually in Moscow right now presenting at the Open Innovation Marketplace and the 33rd IASP conference. It's been amazing to see how much interest is coming in from all around the globe. I would certainly like to discuss how we might be able to collaborate.

Cheers,

Chad

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Brian,

Thanks for your comment! Great gamification application you have created! You are right on the spot; dehydration is a huge issue when you are dealing with organics material. We are working with Aitan Mizrahi   on a technology for optimizing dehydration. We are considering all the issues you are addressing ( energy efficiency, operation cost, etc., etc.) We just went to a conference in Kansas, and we received a lot of feedback on the dehydration part. Now we need to consider all the different aspects of our design.  If you want, we can keep in contact with our progress. Good luck with your idea!

best,
Bertha

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

Brian Tang @Bertha Jimenez @Chad Knutsen Regarding solar power in dehydration, one possibility might be to heat with solar while also passing solar-heated dry air through the system. I think that should reduce the worry about high humidity in tropical climates.
Here's a group that won at the Dell challenge with a Solar Conduction Dryer : http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/uscorp1/secure/2013-05-15-dell-social-innovation-challenge

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Thanks for your comments mate. The issue with using high temperatures to dehydrate foods is that you destroy much of the cellular structure, and lose up to 50% or more of your nutritional content. This also occurs when food is exposed to significant UV radiation (ie: the sun). Also, much traditional solar drying requires large swaths of land covered in tarps etc. to facilitate the drying.

These downfalls are addressed uniquely with our PS Coating method, as we do not require extremes of heat or cold (thus, we preserve 100% of the nutritional content), or lots of land. Also, we are capable of capturing 1800 lbs of raw food per day along with up to 400 gallons of potable water every day (from the food), in each of our economical easily duplicatable, and readily scaleable setups.

Cheers,

Chad

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Chad Knutsen Can we learn more about your dehydration process? I agree that high temperature can lose nutritional value. Would love to try some of your product! What is your email? 
best,
b

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Hello Bertha! My email is chad@cornucopiagroup.org. I would be happy to send you some dehydrated samples. 

Chad

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
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Hi Chad Knutsen 
Great! I will send an email to your inbox then.

thanks!
Bertha

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

Congratulations Bertha Jimenez  on your approach . Your submission is in my shortlist of the 5 most likely winners for this challenge :-)

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thank you Mitul Sarkar :) Hopefully, we would be in the top 5 :) What is your email? I would love to connect...

Photo of marco mihambo
Team

Hello! Bertha Jimenez! I hope you are doing fine! congratulation for your good and innovative ideas......may you please visit this https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/urban-mushroom-farms-network-for-turning-wastes-into-oyster-mushrooms and advise accordingly regarding all aspects for further improvement

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Hey everyone, please check out some pictures and videos from the Falling Walls Lab event! Bertha starts her presentation at the 25 minute mark.

https://vimeo.com/180931493

http://www.germaninnovation.org/shared/content/galleries/206/detail/GCRI-FWL-152-640x425.jpg

http://www.germaninnovation.org/shared/content/galleries/206/detail/GCRI-FWL-350-640x425.jpg

http://www.germaninnovation.org/shared/content/galleries/206/detail/GCRI-FWL-348-640x425.jpg

Photo of Leroy Mwasaru
Team

Hi Bertha,

This is a very ingenious solution! I like how you two collborated to make an even stronger solution to food waste. Let me know what you think of my contribution to the foo waste challenge here: https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/the-greenpact-impact

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

That's a really cool idea. There's a plant near where we live, that does something similar. Check it out! http://www.nyenvironmentreport.com/the-zero-waste-future-is-now-and-its-in-brooklyn/

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Hi Bertha,

Great to see RISE idea posted. It's funny to think that the first iteration of this idea was posted on NYU Global Idea Exchange using OpenIDEO platform! 

I particularly like the various prototypes you've been doing to refine your idea. It seems that you're getting really useful users' feedback. The simple fact that people are interested in participating to the prototypes is already a signal that there is an interest and potentially a need. 

You might want to make sure when you present the RISE idea to be clear about the distinction between the current focus and your overarching goal. As someone who had followed the idea, I understand. Yet, I'm wondering if someone who has never heard of the idea will understand. I'm not sure if it is best to start with the current focus and show the possible generalization, or start with the general idea and show the current focus as a pilot. 
Once again congrats and looking forward to reading / hearing about the next stages.
al

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi AL,

Thanks for your comment! You are right, without the NYU GIE/ OpenIDEO  platform, RISE probably wouldn't have existed. 

Glad you like the prototypes. In fact, part of the team is in Kansas now, and we have had a great experience in a pet food innovation workshop. Tomorrow we will be headed to a lab of one of the speakers, who will help us to standardize our product. The head of the Petfood center department at Kansas State U told us that once we have that step figured out, we should send the material to him. Then they will help us develop a product so that we can reach the market in a faster manner. 

Thanks for the feedback about the presentation of the idea. We will meet the next week with the whole group, and I will go over the really great feedback that we have been given in this the platform, including yours of course :) As you hinted, the overarching goal is to extract value from waste. At this moment, we can only do it one industry at a time. The brewery industry is just our starting point. We believe a similar approach could be used for other industries. 

best,
b

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Bertha, thanks for your response. I understand the need to focus for the pilot. It's an approach that makes perfect sense. My point is simply about storytelling when it comes to sharing your idea. 
Good luck!
al

Photo of mitch Lee
Team

Hey rise team, 

Firstly, congrats on being selected for the Falling Walls Lab Bertha! I'm sure good things will come your way with the commitment you're showing. I wish I actioned things as proficiently as you. 

Re proposal, what about marketing the product to the brewer? 
With the growing obscurity and ambiguity of names of craft beers in the U.S., surely there's an opportunity to match your offering with the brewer. I'm sure the novelty of having a brewery cake would get buy in. And given craft beer is increasingly becoming a bloated market, brewery's need to standout. You would just need to work out a way to make the offering distinct from one brewery to the next. For examples sake, you could add a wee dollop of the brewery's staple beer to the recipe. You guys could be the cake company of the craft industry. Moreover, parallelling hash cookies, what about beer cakes that people can get drunk on? I'd get amongst that haha.

Spiel over, 
M

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Mitch,

Thanks for the congrats :) It was a great experience for us, and we had excellent feedback. 

You made a nice point. We were thinking of giving the breweries a pairing of our goods for the beers. For example, if they make a porter beer, we can use the same grain to create brownies that pair with the same beer. Also, we are thinking of creating pet treats, so if they go with their dog, their pet can enjoy the same grain as you :) Our cakes don't have alcohol, though... But that is what the beers are for :p 

ttyl
b

Photo of Ozuluonye Shedrack
Team

Hi Bertha,
 Your idea sounds interesting, for the fact that you and your team plans to reduce food waste from factories bye products in the US were more companies are looking for how to reduce their waste or bye products. maybe a technology that will facilitate the collection from factories would help your team. hope you will have a bench mark for waste collection, and its should be known to the factories. if not they end up calling you when the waste have become less relevant to your refinement. conversely your team should research on targeted waste from different dishes and possible ways of converting them into   food or useful products with value to human.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Ozuluonye,

Thank you for your comment. You make excellent points.Yes, we are working on at algorithm to help us predict supply and demand. As you say, after a period the by-product does become wasteful. We are starting with BSG, but that is just a starting point (we need to focus at some point :). We are looking into wineries, and supermarkets waste to turn it into food (for human and pet). Next step is to explore different by-products for the construction industry, but for the moment our focus is the food industry. 

Photo of Ozuluonye Shedrack
Team

Hi, you are welcome. Let's make it happen like never before.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Sure!!! Let's join forces :)

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Our updates are up and we have more on the way :-)

Photo of Ozuluonye Shedrack
Team

Already seen your updates, will go through and during the refinement stages I will be able to add a wholistic approach to the idea. It's a great one dear.

Photo of mitch Lee
Team

Hi Bertha, 

Great idea, it's one of my favourites!

Sorry, I'm a tad slow so just to be clear, you are creating a market-led model for secondary offerings (by-products) in competition neutral market segments? In-line with this thinking, I assume the intent is to create new products from organic by-products? For example as asked in your skill help statement: "We would like to work with members of this community to discover new and more efficient applications for spent grain."

If both of these statements resonate your value, consider the following questions (if not, then I've miss fired and I'm sorry haha): Will the guarantee of supply of spent grain from the likes of organic breweries be sustainable? Especially given that organic beer breweries are in the craft beer segment and if memory serves me right, don't craft beer consumers tend to be fickle by nature? Moreover, the does the organic scope of your offering limit the ability to scale accordingly?

Secondly, the process of creating a new product from a raw by-product and then to successfully launch it into the market depends on a lot of things to go right. Moreover, what entity finances the costs for the likes of  warehousing the by-product, processing it, logistics, market research, product development and marketing? And how is equity divided between the stakeholders? 

Food for thought: if the link is to create new products for unrealised markets (or even stable markets), does the offering come in a packaged format? Because that gives you sustainability in terms of increasing the product's life cycle (non-perishable too) which increases the logistical range and the model's ability to scale.

Also, would there be value in understanding what "optimised" format food technologists need in order to see the potential of by-products? For example, could there be value in creating an online brochure marketplace (distinct from e-commerce) of by-products from primary producers that a food technologist can access and then find potential links by combing by-products (between one or more by-products)? Note, this is done in conjunction with market research - I would consider what markets would value the offering at the highest premium to ensure greatest profitability. 

Lastly, could you simplify your offering by focusing on one particular niche? For example, you focus purely on an online marketplace of by-products that acts as a brokering mechanism to ensuring additional supply to product producers who already use the input (e.g., spent grain)? 

I would start with market research at your local tip (nz slang for landfill) in your city and surrounding towns to understand the suppliers of surplus in your area.

Again, this is just an opinion.

I wish you all the best,
Mitch

Photo of Ashwin Gopi
Team

Hey Mitch, you've grasped the concept! You're right, we are aiming to be a marketplace for industrial by-products. However, as a first step, we are focussing on one industry, testing applications for the by-product and creating enough demand for it.

The supply of spent grain is definitely sustainable. Beer production and consumption has been on a steady rise over the last two decades. The head brewer from Sixpoint told me that it's because people drink to celebrate when they're happy and drink to drown their worries when they're sad. In Brooklyn alone, there was a production of 6000 Tons of spent grain in 2015.

As a clarification, when we talk about organic by-products, we are referring to any plant and animal based matter. We are not limiting ourselves to organic certified breweries, sorry for the confusion! We are currently working with craft breweries because they produce smaller (and more manageable) amounts of grain, but this process is easily scalable to larger breweries.

We are our own lab rats - we've been regularly eating spent grain products for the last few weeks to see the effects on our diets. Right now, we're working with a small grant we received from NYU for market research and building a digital presence. We have also pitched in some of our own money to support these experiments. Each member of our team also volunteers their spare time to this venture. We pick up the grain in large buckets and transport it by subway or a friend's car. We store it in our friends' and neighbors' houses when our freezers get full.

We have registered ourselves as an LLC and the equity is shared among the founders. When we stated that we create value for all stokeholders, we meant that we help our suppliers cut disposal costs by offering them free or subsidized pick ups, and our customers by providing them a low-cost and sustainable alternative ingredient.  Our goal is to generate revenue by selling these products and then the raw material. This revenue will sustain our operations such as storage, processing and logistics. The profit will help us expand our production from the kitchen to a small and dedicated facility. We are planning to work with on-demand logistics and volunteer bakeries and kitchens to keep our costs low and be socially responsible. We want to help create low-cost products that are easily available, cheaper and healthier than traditional packaged foods.

In terms of formats, the flour we create has a shelf life of 3-6 months if sealed in a pantry, or 6-12 months in a freezer, just like any other flour. This is because we completely dehydrate it, mill it thoroughly, and store it in air-tight containers. The shelf life of products that are made from it depends on the other ingredients and additives. Currently, the products we create have a low shelf life because they only have natural ingredients and no preservatives. This is why we are planning to sell it at a Cafe around the corner which also has a chilled counter.

One optimized format we are currently exploring is a dissolvable powder that can be mixed with water or milk, or act as a food additive. This can be created by extracting protein from  the spent grain using an isolation process. However, this is a more complex process and we require a lab setting and some expertise. This is why we are planning to work with food engineers on this aspect.

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for your comment. Great points you made! I think Ashwin had tackled most of your questions... Thanks, Ashwin :)  I only want to add something regarding the comment of the brokerage. We have been thinking about this idea for a while. We thought about the brokerage model because it seems simpler and easier to scale. We tested it. We found out that most of the buyers were risk adverse.  It was very hard to make them try new things. So, even if we tell them all the benefits of the beer spent grain, they won't used because they are not sure about this new material. That is why we added this extra step in which we created proof of concepts products, and we show that it is possible to use the materials. We need to create a demand before we create a marketplace. That is what we are doing, by understanding the value and testing it in the market. 

Photo of mitch Lee
Team

It sounds like it is all go, I'm chuffed for you guys.

Might be a silly question, but is there a way to marry up the nutritional information of spent grain with products in the market that have the same input? Obviously inputs vary dependent on the level of extraction from by-product processing.

Have you thought about combining spent grain with another by-product to give you more scope?  For example, I'm aware of grape seed extracts being turned into premium natural health products (google Tuatara Natural Health), and I'm pretty sure there was one other by-product in the end product too. Another example that comes to mind is of a seafood company that sold their fish tails (by-product) to a pet food brand who made the fish tails into a premium pet food. Also worth knowing, was the seafood company didn't know the potential of their by-product, and neither did the pet food company. It was an intermediary who connected the dots in order for the value to be recognised. 

Also, I would check out case studies from http://danishfoodcluster.dk/, they have stories that resonate with yours. It will also provide you with some idea of businesses that would add value to your entity.

Lastly, regarding market research, you could do it lean by putting your by-product ingredient offering on every forum you can think of that may render some insightful feedback e.g., food tech blogs, food magazines, institutions etc and see whether any fresh thinking comes from that. That'll also let you know whether there's potential value in creating facilitation mechanisms for the likes of product development. And hey, blue sky thinking, it could turn into an incentivised competition platform - food techs competing to create the best utilisation of a by-product with a equity stake for the winner. 

Thanks again for sharing your story in more detail.

Best regards,
Mitch

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Thanks, Mitch.... I love your comments. We were thinking of looking into other by-products for nutritional value as well. We thought about the winery (pomace- skin n seeds of grape) for extraction of nutrients. I am sure there are much more, and the seed idea that you point out is great... If you have more of that resources, please let us know. I will check out the link you sent us. Also, I adore your competition idea... Maybe it could be done for RISE 2.0 :) That will be a great wait for make people think about a new usage for things that were discarded initially (and also a great resource for us :) I always think that great ideas always come through collaboration :) Thanks for your input.

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Our updates are up and we have more on the way :-)

Photo of Aitan Mizrahi
Team

Hello RISE,

We here at Upcylery in West Oakland are involved in developing a similar process which we are calling Scraps to Feed (see our submission from the research phase, challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/research/scraps-to-feed). We would love to speak with you about your operation and hear about your successes and challenges. At the moment one of our challenges is the drying/dehydrating of the wet byproduct. We too are collecting materials from breweries, distilleries, and a tofu manufacturer.  Our focus is to craft a high-quality, shelf-stable livestock feed primarily for fish and chickens. We would be happy to share with you what we've come up with in the last few months of working on this project. Please let me know how would be best to connect.

With industrial symbiosis,
Aitan Mizrahi

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Hey Aitan, we checked out your FB page. What you're doing is awesome! We want to do something similar. We should have an online meeting ASAP. Let me know what your availability is. You can write to me at ag3167@nyu.edu

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Our updates are up and we have more on the way :-)

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congrats on this being today's Featured Contribution!

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Thanks, this very exciting! We have some great updates: we've made some new connections with bakers and breweries, and we have found a few outlets to showcase our products. We're also creating an app, so keep your eyes open!

Photo of Bertha Jimenez
Team

Wow! Thanks so much :) Yes, we have incredible updates coming up soon :) Also, we are going to pet food workshop to continue our learning of how to make amazing pet foods with great by-products :)

Photo of Ashwin Goutham
Team

Our updates are up and we have more on the way :-)